History Main / Humansacrifice

23rd May '17 8:02:11 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]] in UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain) called for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions, and there was no organized religious authority to make it a common policy among all Hindu sects. The Mughal emperors and several Hindu reformers opposed it, and UsefulNotes/TheRaj managed to put the kibosh on it for the most part (while citing and exaggerating it as propaganda to justify colonization).

to:

* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]] in UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain) called for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions, and since there was no organized religious authority to make it a common policy among all Hindu sects. The Mughal emperors and several Hindu reformers opposed it, and UsefulNotes/TheRaj managed to put the kibosh on it for the most part (while citing and exaggerating it as propaganda to justify colonization).
23rd May '17 8:01:07 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]] in UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions, and there was no organized religious authority to make it a common policy among all Hindu sects. The Mughal emperors and several Hindu reformers opposed it, and UsefulNotes/TheRaj managed to put the kibosh on it for the most part (while citing and exaggerating it as propaganda to justify colonization).

to:

* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]] in UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain) calls called for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions, and there was no organized religious authority to make it a common policy among all Hindu sects. The Mughal emperors and several Hindu reformers opposed it, and UsefulNotes/TheRaj managed to put the kibosh on it for the most part (while citing and exaggerating it as propaganda to justify colonization).
21st May '17 12:50:02 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* At the end of their service, priests of Kahek in the [[TheWanderersLibrary Haskhian Inscriptions]] sacrifice themselves to their god.

to:

* At the end of their service, priests of Kahek in the [[TheWanderersLibrary [[Wiki/TheWanderersLibrary Haskhian Inscriptions]] sacrifice themselves to their god.
16th May '17 10:15:32 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played surprisingly neutrally in ''[[{{Tsukihime}} Kagetsu Tohya]]'' with Nanako, the spirit inside the Seventh Scripture. Arihiko is initially horrified and angry to learn that she was sacrificed to be joined to a unicorn spirit (long story) and made into a holy relic. However, she replies that she was happy do it, volunteered for it, and was proud to have something useful she could do with her life. Still doesn't resent it. The mother who sold her into this service, though, eventually wasted away and died out of guilt, spending her time apologizing to nothing despite being pretty well off for after the transaction. Nanako, who watched all this happen, was more depressed about this than her actual sacrifice, and decided to disperse her consciousness afterwards... until she met Ciel, who she quite likes despite her constantly ''remodeling'' her.

to:

* Played surprisingly neutrally in ''[[{{Tsukihime}} ''[[VisualNovel/{{Tsukihime}} Kagetsu Tohya]]'' with Nanako, the spirit inside the Seventh Scripture. Arihiko is initially horrified and angry to learn that she was sacrificed to be joined to a unicorn spirit (long story) and made into a holy relic. However, she replies that she was happy do it, volunteered for it, and was proud to have something useful she could do with her life. Still doesn't resent it. The mother who sold her into this service, though, eventually wasted away and died out of guilt, spending her time apologizing to nothing despite being pretty well off for after the transaction. Nanako, who watched all this happen, was more depressed about this than her actual sacrifice, and decided to disperse her consciousness afterwards... until she met Ciel, who she quite likes despite her constantly ''remodeling'' her.
16th May '17 8:17:19 AM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]] in VictorianLondon) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it.
** Sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions and there was, mercifully, no Hindu organized temple to make this a common policy among all Hindu sects across the Subcontinent. The Mughal Emperors and several Hindu reformers before the English opposed it and ended up restricting it even more. It became part of Imperial propaganda to justify colonialism however (as did the Thuggee Cult whose rumal assassinations were supposedly a ritual assassination to Kali).

to:

* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]] in VictorianLondon) UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. \n** Sati Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions millions, and there was, mercifully, was no Hindu organized temple religious authority to make this it a common policy among all Hindu sects across the Subcontinent. sects. The Mughal Emperors emperors and several Hindu reformers before the English opposed it it, and ended up restricting UsefulNotes/TheRaj managed to put the kibosh on it even more. It became for the most part of Imperial (while citing and exaggerating it as propaganda to justify colonialism however (as did the Thuggee Cult whose rumal assassinations were supposedly a ritual assassination to Kali). colonization).
10th May '17 7:14:33 PM emperors
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Played with in ''Film/TheBeastmaster'': A child is being offered up as a sacrifice to the evil god Aar on top of a pyramid. The Beastmaster sends his falcon animal pal to grab the infant and fly it to safety. The BigBad evil priest watches it fly away, then turns to his minions: "See! Aar has spoken! He wants your children!"
** The second child got saved. The first one was not so lucky and got tossed into a fire pit.

to:

* Played with in ''Film/TheBeastmaster'': A child is being offered up as a sacrifice to the evil god Aar on top of a pyramid. He gets thrown in the fire. The second child is about to be sacrificed. The Beastmaster sends his falcon animal pal to grab the infant and fly it her to safety. The BigBad evil priest watches it fly away, then turns to his minions: "See! Aar has spoken! He wants your children!"
** The second child got saved. The first one was not so lucky and got tossed into a fire pit.
children!"
9th May '17 7:40:59 AM BeerBaron
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', in order to start a quest to get special armor from the daedric prince Boethiah, you have to sacrifice one of your followers.

to:

* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** The now-extinct [[OurElvesAreDifferent Ayleids (Wild Elves)]] of Cyrodiil enslaved the Nedes (ancestors to most of the modern races of Men) and inflicted vile tortures upon them.
In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', some cases, as mentioned in order the ''Adabal-a'', they sacrificed their slaves to start a appease their various deities.
** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', starting the [[OurGodsAreDifferent Daedric Prince]] Boethiah's
quest to get special armor from the daedric prince Boethiah, you have to sacrifice requires sacrificing one of your followers.followers. (The reward for completing the quest is one of the best legendary armor sets in the game.)
23rd Apr '17 11:11:43 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Many human cultures have practiced human sacrifice, but none on a scale to match the Aztecs, or more precisely, the Mexica. Their imperial expansionist wars allowed them to secure sacrificial victims, ''a lot'' of sacrificial victims, both to keep the cycle of life going in debt to the gods' own sacrifice to create the mortal world, as well as for political intimidation. Since a brave warrior was believed to be the sacrifice most pleasing to the gods, the Aztecs forced their rival neighbors of Tlaxcala to fight staged "flower wars" with them, the only purpose of which was for each side to take captives from the other, for sacrifice. This would prove to be their undoing, for when the Spaniards arrived, Tlaxcala and other states allied to them to bring down the empire.
** Which explains a great deal about {{Mayincatec}}.
*** It should be added that the "flower wars," as any scholar of pre-Columbian Mexican history will say, were conducted at a high level of protocol, at least by the standards of the civilization that practiced them. Far from being treated as slaves, the doomed captives were treated with enormous respect and were even the guests of honor at a lavish banquet to celebrate the coming sacrifice. For men who were going to get their hearts ripped out of their chests, it was about as pleasant a send-off as one could imagine.
** The Incas performed some human sacrifices too, though nowhere near the scale of the Aztecs. Mostly they were children.
* There is some indication the ancient Hebrews had once practiced human sacrifice (along with most Near Eastern cultures). First there is the famous Binding of Isaac, in which Abraham nearly sacrifices him at God's command, before he's replaced with a goat (possibly symbolic of giving it up). Jephthah later promises God whatever comes out to greet him when he returns home if he's victorious against the Ammonites. Unfortunately this turns out to be his own daughter. Some have interpreted this as due to a widespread disregard of the Jewish law at the time (which forbade human sacrifice) and God punishing his foolishness for making such an open-ended offer so that no one else would do this. Others claim that his daughter was not sacrificed at all, but merely confined or kept a perpetual virgin. The Bible mentions human sacrifice in many instances by other cultures also, and archaeology confirms the Biblical claims.
** Several idol-furnaces of Molech have been discovered, which were used for roasting babies alive. There's a reason why his name has been reused for demons in modern mythologies.
** There is also UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} of course, although that was a self-sacrifice.
** Carthage famously had human sacrifices, especially of young children. There appears to have been a complex set of rules governing the practice; it seems that in general, child sacrifice was only practiced in times of extreme crisis, and only by the agreement of all the leading families (Carthage was a republic ruled primarily by its rich/noble citizens), each of which would have to give up a child. Usually the child sacrificed is the firstborn, as there is a general Semetic idea that the first fruits--be it crops, grapes, cattle, or children--belonged to God, whether that means they should be merely ''dedicated'' to the deity or literally "returned to sender" as a burnt offering varies with time and place. During the Punic Wars, the Romans found this habit of the Carthaginians to be particularly disgusting (this may also have been the Romans projecting a bit -- they had recently abolished human sacrifices themselves, and this tradition did survive and evolved into the GladiatorGames).
*** Ironically, during the Second Punic War, with Hannibal's army at its doorstep, Romans themselves resorted to human sacrifice -- the last official human sacrifice in Roman history.

to:

* Many human cultures have practiced human sacrifice, but none on a scale to match the Aztecs, or more precisely, the Mexica. Their imperial expansionist wars allowed them to secure sacrificial victims, ''a lot'' of sacrificial victims, both to keep the cycle of life going in debt to the gods' own sacrifice to create the mortal world, as well as for political intimidation. Since a brave warrior was believed to be the sacrifice most pleasing to the gods, the Aztecs forced their rival neighbors of Tlaxcala to fight staged "flower wars" with them, the only purpose of which was for each side to take captives from the other, for sacrifice. This would prove to be their undoing, for when the Spaniards arrived, Tlaxcala and other states allied to them to bring down the empire.
**
empire. Which explains a great deal about {{Mayincatec}}.
*** ** It should be added that the "flower wars," as any scholar of pre-Columbian Mexican history will say, were conducted at a high level of protocol, at least by the standards of the civilization that practiced them. Far from being treated as slaves, the doomed captives were treated with enormous respect and were even the guests of honor at a lavish banquet to celebrate the coming sacrifice. For men who were going to get their hearts ripped out of their chests, it was about as pleasant a send-off as one could imagine.
**
imagine. The Incas performed some human sacrifices too, though nowhere near the scale of the Aztecs. Mostly they were children.
* There is some indication the ancient Hebrews had once practiced human sacrifice (along with most Near Eastern cultures). First there is the famous Binding of Isaac, in which Abraham nearly sacrifices him at God's command, before he's replaced with a goat (possibly symbolic of giving it up). Jephthah later promises God whatever comes out to greet him when he returns home if he's victorious against the Ammonites. Unfortunately this turns out to be his own daughter. Some have interpreted this as due to a widespread disregard of the Jewish law at the time (which forbade human sacrifice) and God punishing his foolishness for making such an open-ended offer so that no one else would do this. Others claim that his daughter was not sacrificed at all, but merely confined or kept a perpetual virgin. The Bible mentions human sacrifice in many instances by other cultures also, and archaeology confirms the Biblical claims.
**
claims. Several idol-furnaces of Molech have been discovered, which were used for roasting babies alive. There's a reason why his name has been reused for demons in modern mythologies.
** There is also UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} of course, although that was a self-sacrifice.
** Carthage famously had
* According to the Romans, Carthaginians performed human sacrifices, especially of young children. There appears to have been a complex set of rules governing the practice; it seems that in general, child sacrifice was only practiced in times of extreme crisis, and only by the agreement of all the leading families (Carthage was a republic ruled primarily by its rich/noble citizens), each of which would have to give up a child. Usually the child sacrificed is the firstborn, as there is a general Semetic idea that the first fruits--be it crops, grapes, cattle, or children--belonged to God, whether that means they should be merely ''dedicated'' to the deity or literally "returned to sender" as a burnt offering varies with time and place. During the Punic Wars, the Romans found this habit of the Carthaginians to be particularly disgusting (this may also have been disgusting
** Livy states in his histories that during the [[UsefulNotes/PunicWars Second War against Carthage]],
the Romans projecting after the Battle of Cannae fell into such a bit -- DespairEventHorizon that they sacrificed two Greeks and two Gauls in a stone chamber and buried them alive. Livy states that this was an exception and that it was not common in Rome, but some historians read that as naturally a SuspiciouslySpecificDenial, with some believing that the practice was once quite widespread indeed.
** Incidentally, the Romans were fond of doing such fun things as dumping deformed and sick-looking infants in garbage dumps while they were alive because
they had recently abolished human sacrifices themselves, a Spartan attitude to these things. Likewise, Vestal Virgins who were caught fooling around (and not being virgins) were also buried alive in stone chambers as punishment, and this tradition did survive some people see these ugly punishments as SerialNumbersFiledOff of earlier practices of child and evolved into virgin sacrifice. Likewise some argue that the GladiatorGames).
*** Ironically, during
early bloody phase of the Second Punic War, with Hannibal's army at its doorstep, Romans themselves resorted to human sacrifice -- GladiatorGames and the last official human sacrifice throwing of people to the lions in Roman history.the Collosseum is another evolution of that sacrificial rituals.



** {{Viking funeral}}s for chieftains also had a slave sacrifice as part of the ritual to send the chieftain's soul to Valhalla. Modern depictions, of course, leave out this little detail, focusing instead on the awesome image of a flaming ship being sent on its final voyage.

to:

** {{Viking funeral}}s for chieftains also had a slave sacrifice as part of the ritual to send the chieftain's soul to Valhalla. One chronicle describes that the Swedish Vikings would nominate a slave girl for the "honour" and she would have sex with a bunch of village elders and then be placed on the ship. Modern depictions, of course, leave out this little detail, focusing instead on the awesome image of a flaming ship being sent on its final voyage.



* Human sacrifice -- called ''muti'' -- is still practiced today among certain Nigerian peoples.
* The Etruscans, and later the Romans, practiced a form of human sacrifice until it was officially outlawed during the Republic era. That didn't prevent some people from occasionally doing it anyway. The practice did evolve into the famous GladiatorGames.



* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]]) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions. The practice eventually fell into permanent disfavor, with both Indian reformers and British officials condemning the practice starting in the mid-19th century. The British attitude was rather pithily summed up by Gen. Sir Charles Napier, Governor of Sindh 1843-47:
--> Be it so. This burning of widows is your custom; prepare the funeral pile. But my nation also has a custom. When men burn women alive we hang them, and confiscate all their property. My carpenters shall therefore erect gibbets on which to hang all concerned when the widow is consumed. Let us all act according to national customs.

to:

* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]]) suttee]] in VictorianLondon) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati
** Sati
was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions. millions and there was, mercifully, no Hindu organized temple to make this a common policy among all Hindu sects across the Subcontinent. The practice eventually fell into permanent disfavor, with both Indian Mughal Emperors and several Hindu reformers before the English opposed it and British officials condemning ended up restricting it even more. It became part of Imperial propaganda to justify colonialism however (as did the practice starting in the mid-19th century. The British attitude was rather pithily summed up by Gen. Sir Charles Napier, Governor of Sindh 1843-47:
--> Be it so. This burning of widows is your custom; prepare the funeral pile. But my nation also has
Thuggee Cult whose rumal assassinations were supposedly a custom. When men burn women alive we hang them, and confiscate all their property. My carpenters shall therefore erect gibbets on which ritual assassination to hang all concerned when the widow is consumed. Let us all act according to national customs.Kali).
13th Apr '17 11:34:51 AM DustSnitch
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** There is also {{Jesus}} of course, although that was a self-sacrifice.

to:

** There is also {{Jesus}} UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} of course, although that was a self-sacrifice.
11th Apr '17 8:36:16 PM Fireblood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* With the possible exception of the Ancient Semitic cultures. The Bible mentions human sacrifice in many instances, and archaeology has confirmed the Biblical claims.

to:

* With There is some indication the possible exception ancient Hebrews had once practiced human sacrifice (along with most Near Eastern cultures). First there is the famous Binding of Isaac, in which Abraham nearly sacrifices him at God's command, before he's replaced with a goat (possibly symbolic of giving it up). Jephthah later promises God whatever comes out to greet him when he returns home if he's victorious against the Ammonites. Unfortunately this turns out to be his own daughter. Some have interpreted this as due to a widespread disregard of the Ancient Semitic cultures. Jewish law at the time (which forbade human sacrifice) and God punishing his foolishness for making such an open-ended offer so that no one else would do this. Others claim that his daughter was not sacrificed at all, but merely confined or kept a perpetual virgin. The Bible mentions human sacrifice in many instances, instances by other cultures also, and archaeology has confirmed confirms the Biblical claims.



** There is also {{Jesus}} of course, although that was a self-sacrifice.



** {{Viking Funeral}}s for chieftains also had a slave sacrifice as part of the ritual to send the chieftain's soul to Valhalla. Modern depictions, of course, leave out this little detail, focusing instead on the awesome image of a flaming ship being sent on its final voyage.

to:

** {{Viking Funeral}}s funeral}}s for chieftains also had a slave sacrifice as part of the ritual to send the chieftain's soul to Valhalla. Modern depictions, of course, leave out this little detail, focusing instead on the awesome image of a flaming ship being sent on its final voyage.



* Human sacrifice -- called ''muti'' is still practiced today among certain Nigerian peoples.

to:

* Human sacrifice -- called ''muti'' -- is still practiced today among certain Nigerian peoples.



* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]]) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions. The practice eventually fell into permanent disfavour, with both Indian reformers and British officials condemning the practice starting in the mid-19th century. The British attitude was rather pithily summed up by Gen. Sir Charles Napier, Governor of Sindh 1843-47:

to:

* The obsolete UsefulNotes/{{Hindu|ism}} tradition of sati (or [[SpellMyNameWithAnS suttee]]) calls for a widow to [[SelfImmolation burn herself alive on her husband's funeral pyre]] and join him in death. Originally considered the noble and heartfelt act of a grieving widow, it became slightly less voluntary as it gained popularity, and women who hesitated or changed their minds were often..."encouraged" to go through with it. Thankfully, sati was mostly limited to certain upper-[[TypeCaste caste]] communities and didn't exceed several hundred victims per year out of a population of millions. The practice eventually fell into permanent disfavour, disfavor, with both Indian reformers and British officials condemning the practice starting in the mid-19th century. The British attitude was rather pithily summed up by Gen. Sir Charles Napier, Governor of Sindh 1843-47:



* The Celts commonly sacrificed humans for their gods, normally in pretty brutal ways. Normally, these victims would be captives from battle. However they would sometimes use it as a punishment, for instance if crops failed they would kill some of the fathers. In times of emergency they would place people in a wicker man and burn them alive (some historians dispute this, but there are Celtic legends of similar happenings occurring, such as victims being chained in their home, and then the Celts setting it on fire). As most of what we know about them was written by the Romans, these claims may have been exaggerated. However, archaeological evidence has proven it did happen. Victims were also buried in peat bogs, and at sites such as Stonehenge.

to:

* In ancient Egypt, the household of the Pharoah used to be sacrificed when he died and buried along with him, to serve in the next world. Japan also once had a similar tradition with its emperors, but it thankfully fell out of favor over time before at last being outlawed.
* The Celts commonly sacrificed humans for their gods, normally in pretty brutal ways. Normally, these victims would be captives from battle. However they would sometimes use it as a punishment, for instance if crops failed they would kill some of the fathers. In times of emergency they would place people in a wicker man and burn them alive (some historians dispute this, but there are Celtic legends of similar happenings occurring, such as victims being chained in their home, and then the Celts setting it on fire). As most of what we know about them was written by the Romans, these claims may have been exaggerated. However, archaeological evidence has proven it did happen.happen sometimes. Victims were also buried in peat bogs, and at sites such as Stonehenge.
This list shows the last 10 events of 485. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Humansacrifice