History Main / HouseRules

23rd Oct '16 7:16:11 AM Morgenthaler
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* There are certain card games that are entirely based on house rules. For example, one game called ''{{Mao}}'' has only one real rule at the start; it's exactly like Uno with regular playing cards (no draw cards or wildcards), and the winner of a hand can make up a rule each turn so long as it doesn't favor anybody in particular. It generally starts with at least one or two extra rules so that you can trip people up. An even more crazy version of this was a game where you could make a rule any time you played an 8 card, and the rule could do anything besides make you win instantly without playing a card.

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* There are certain card games that are entirely based on house rules. For example, one game called ''{{Mao}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Mao}}'' has only one real rule at the start; it's exactly like Uno with regular playing cards (no draw cards or wildcards), and the winner of a hand can make up a rule each turn so long as it doesn't favor anybody in particular. It generally starts with at least one or two extra rules so that you can trip people up. An even more crazy version of this was a game where you could make a rule any time you played an 8 card, and the rule could do anything besides make you win instantly without playing a card.
16th Oct '16 4:44:48 AM Morgenthaler
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* HouseRules for most ''HeroSystem'' campaigns were more about the flavor of the setting than modifying the actual game, though there were always additions to the already long list of Advantages and Disadvantages.

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* HouseRules for most ''HeroSystem'' ''TabletopGame/HeroSystem'' campaigns were more about the flavor of the setting than modifying the actual game, though there were always additions to the already long list of Advantages and Disadvantages.
6th Aug '16 3:24:48 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Certain multiplayer features of ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' get this treatment. The [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Living Dead]] gametype started out as a juggernaut variant in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''. [[AscendedMeme Bungie officially made it a gametype in Halo 3. ]] In fact, the Forge mode for ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' is designed so that players can [[InvokedTrope invoke this trope]].
** This was also the beginning of Griffball, as well as numerous other games in the Action Sack playlist.

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* Certain multiplayer features of ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' get this treatment. In fact, Forge mode, originally introduced in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'', is designed so that players can [[InvokedTrope invoke this trope]].
**
The [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Living Dead]] Dead]]/Infection gametype started out as a juggernaut variant in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 2}}''. Creator/{{Bungie}} [[AscendedMeme Bungie officially made it a gametype gametype]] in Halo 3. ]] In fact, ''Halo 3'', and Creator/ThreeFourThreeIndustries even made unique skins for the Forge mode for zombies in ''VideoGame/{{Halo 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/HaloReach'' is designed so that players can [[InvokedTrope invoke this trope]].
4}}''[='s=] version of this, Flood.
** This was also the beginning of Griffball, Grifball (basically rugby with swords and hammers), as well as numerous other games in the Action Sack playlist.
7th Jul '16 5:02:42 AM Morgenthaler
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* ICE's ''{{Rolemaster}}'' system is designed to be very flexible and encourages the use of house rules.
* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'' is ''built'' on this trope. In a game where it's very easy (and surprisingly affordable) to get infinite attacks in a round, the core rule book spends a great deal of time letting the GM know that they have every right to disallow certain 'legal' actions. It's also not uncommon for certain rules to be ignored if they'll slow down the game.

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* ICE's ''{{Rolemaster}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{Rolemaster}}'' system is designed to be very flexible and encourages the use of house rules.
* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'' ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'' is ''built'' on this trope. In a game where it's very easy (and surprisingly affordable) to get infinite attacks in a round, the core rule book spends a great deal of time letting the GM know that they have every right to disallow certain 'legal' actions. It's also not uncommon for certain rules to be ignored if they'll slow down the game.



* ''SpiritOfTheCentury'' despite being the first FATE game to hit the market had a notoriously bad stress system that was almost universally house ruled over. There are still a great many variations out there.

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* ''SpiritOfTheCentury'' ''TabletopGame/SpiritOfTheCentury'' despite being the first FATE game to hit the market had a notoriously bad stress system that was almost universally house ruled over. There are still a great many variations out there.
3rd Jun '16 6:48:51 AM skarl
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Added DiffLines:

* When playing Jungle Speed, engaging in a tug-of-war over the totem is, according to the rules, a foul, and should result in the player who starts it collecting all the cards on the table. Many older players disregard this rule, and in fact encourage fighting over the totem.
26th Mar '16 9:40:52 AM nombretomado
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* {{Cricket}} has many house rules when played casually. These have hundreds of variants and different names, depending on where you live. A small sample of the more common:

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* {{Cricket}} UsefulNotes/{{Cricket}} has many house rules when played casually. These have hundreds of variants and different names, depending on where you live. A small sample of the more common:
30th Jan '16 10:58:27 AM Morgenthaler
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* In ''{{Chrononauts}}'', a purely-for-flavor house rule is that whenever you change a linchpin, you have to explain how you're changing it. If someone changes it back, they need to explain how they changed what you did. This can lead to some very amusing chains of events.

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* In ''{{Chrononauts}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{Chrononauts}}'', a purely-for-flavor house rule is that whenever you change a linchpin, you have to explain how you're changing it. If someone changes it back, they need to explain how they changed what you did. This can lead to some very amusing chains of events.
17th Jan '16 4:40:56 PM nombretomado
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* The Ur-Quan Masters (StarControl II) has a few for online games, mostly because the game itself doesn't enforce any standards:

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* The Ur-Quan Masters (StarControl II) (''VideoGame/StarControlII'') has a few for online games, mostly because the game itself doesn't enforce any standards:
15th Jan '16 6:10:23 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Main/{{Rifts}}'', in particular, is often modified. It's intentionally created with no balance to speak of, and each power, spell, and piece of technology is written without considering how it interacts with the rest of the system. Most of the rules were initially created for other Palladium games that focused on human (or human-ish) characters: Ninjas & Superspies, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Robotech, etc. Since Rifts has everything from super-powered humans to giant mecha to demons to gods in it, there aren't any guidelines for, say, when your martial arts stop being effective. (6-foot human throwing a 7-foot insect with Judo? Not mentioned, but probably okay. 6-foot human throwing a 25-foot demon? Still not mentioned.) For bonus points, the rules are (intentionally?) just slightly vague. For extra special bonus points, the entire Palladium game system (of which Rifts is a member) is supposedly cross-compatible, but each particular game uses slightly different rules. Main/HouseRules to the rescue!

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* ''Main/{{Rifts}}'', ''TabletopGame/{{Rifts}}'', in particular, is often modified. It's intentionally created with no balance to speak of, and each power, spell, and piece of technology is written without considering how it interacts with the rest of the system. Most of the rules were initially created for other Palladium games that focused on human (or human-ish) characters: Ninjas & Superspies, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Robotech, etc. Since Rifts has everything from super-powered humans to giant mecha to demons to gods in it, there aren't any guidelines for, say, when your martial arts stop being effective. (6-foot human throwing a 7-foot insect with Judo? Not mentioned, but probably okay. 6-foot human throwing a 25-foot demon? Still not mentioned.) For bonus points, the rules are (intentionally?) just slightly vague. For extra special bonus points, the entire Palladium game system (of which Rifts is a member) is supposedly cross-compatible, but each particular game uses slightly different rules. Main/HouseRules to the rescue!



* ''{{GURPS}}'' suggests various possible house rules in the sourcebooks. Apparently the most popular house (that isn't suggested) is to separate the extremely broad IQ stat from also raising Perception and Will.

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* ''{{GURPS}}'' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' suggests various possible house rules in the sourcebooks. Apparently the most popular house (that isn't suggested) is to separate the extremely broad IQ stat from also raising Perception and Will.



* ''TheFantasyTrip'' specifies that characters die when they reach 0 hit points, no exceptions. Most players find this a bit harsh, especially since player characters start with an average of 10 hp and rarely get much above 16, and healing is pretty severely limited. So most campaigns either have an "official house rule" allowing characters to survive having their hit points reduced to 0 or below, or the GM does a lot of fudging.

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* ''TheFantasyTrip'' ''TabletopGame/TheFantasyTrip'' specifies that characters die when they reach 0 hit points, no exceptions. Most players find this a bit harsh, especially since player characters start with an average of 10 hp and rarely get much above 16, and healing is pretty severely limited. So most campaigns either have an "official house rule" allowing characters to survive having their hit points reduced to 0 or below, or the GM does a lot of fudging.
28th Oct '15 4:57:55 PM MarkLungo
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* [[http://plusev.keenspot.com/d/20070928.html Here]] in ''PlusEV''. Be careful to play against Konsta with his own deck.
* ''OzyAndMillie'' has [[http://ozyandmillie.org/1999/01/25/ozy-and-millie-153/ House Rules]] [[http://ozyandmillie.org/1999/01/26/ozy-and-millie-154/ Parcheesi]], which appears to have more in common with {{Calvinball}} than any board game. We never hear anything about the rules or gameplay, seeing only snapshots and aftermath.

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* [[http://plusev.keenspot.com/d/20070928.html Here]] in ''PlusEV''.''Webcomic/PlusEV''. Be careful to play against Konsta with his own deck.
* ''OzyAndMillie'' ''Webcomic/OzyAndMillie'' has [[http://ozyandmillie.org/1999/01/25/ozy-and-millie-153/ House Rules]] [[http://ozyandmillie.org/1999/01/26/ozy-and-millie-154/ Parcheesi]], which appears to have more in common with {{Calvinball}} than any board game. We never hear anything about the rules or gameplay, seeing only snapshots and aftermath.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HouseRules