History Main / HotPursuit

21st Jun '17 10:47:31 AM CosmicFerret
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Roscoe P. Coletrain from ''TheDukesOfHazzard'' would gleefully shout over his CB that he was in "Hot Puuuur-Suit!" of the Duke boys, frequently followed by him driving [[LemmingCops off a cliff]] or into a lake when he couldn't match the Duke's driving ability.

to:

* Roscoe P. Coletrain from ''TheDukesOfHazzard'' ''Series/TheDukesOfHazzard'' would gleefully shout over his CB that he was in "Hot Puuuur-Suit!" of the Duke boys, frequently followed by him driving [[LemmingCops off a cliff]] or into a lake when he couldn't match the Duke's driving ability.
12th Feb '17 7:46:07 AM Yalsaris63
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Video game example: In the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' series, the police will chase you after a simple fender bender. If the chase goes on long enough (and enough officers [[LemmingCops get killed trying to chase you]]), SWAT teams, helicopters, soldiers and eventually tanks will be called in to take you down. Though to be fair, after the player has killed multiple police officers and racked up thousands of dollars in property damage, they have some valid reasons to call in the tanks and jets.

to:

* Video game example: In both the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' and ''VideoGame/SaintsRow'' series, the police will chase you after a simple fender bender. If the chase goes on long enough (and enough officers [[LemmingCops get killed trying to chase you]]), SWAT teams, helicopters, soldiers and eventually tanks will be called in to take you down. Though to be fair, after the player has killed multiple police officers and racked up thousands of dollars in property damage, they have some valid reasons to call in the tanks and jets.
13th Aug '16 5:34:41 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.

to:

* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. twice.
**
In ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in back.
** In
''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
30th Jul '16 4:50:05 PM krimzonflygon2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


----

to:

--------

''[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F16OciDmQ7g Well hey, hey, Mister Policeman! Bet I can drive faster'n you can!]]''
27th Jul '16 7:02:54 PM JudasZala
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The "Police Pursuit" mode in Creator/SternPinball's ''[[Pinball/MustangStern Mustang]]''

to:

* The "Police Pursuit" mode in Creator/SternPinball's ''[[Pinball/MustangStern Mustang]]''Mustang]]''.
* This is what Couch Multiball is in ''Pinball/TheSimpsonsPinballParty'', when the entire Springfield Police force chasing the Simpson Family for hoarding pinballs.
7th Jun '16 12:15:18 AM lavendermintrose
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In episode 8 of ''Anime/{{K}}'', the supernatural police force Scepter 4 deploys all of its helicopters to apprehend the Silver King from his airship. Doumyouji, a member of the top squad, remarks that it seems like a lot. It's [[JustifiedTrope justified]], though - the Silver King is the most powerful of the seven Kings in that system, and he's been acting [[OutOfCharacterAlert peculiar recently]]... since the night of the incident they're investigating, actually.



*** Shouted out in TheAnimatedSeries when a thief is being pursued by both the guards and Aladdin himself. The scene is an almost shot-for-shot remake of the one from the move (before the singing), only the thief in question is nowhere near as good as Aladdin is, and stole a huge diamond ("All this for a diamond?").

to:

*** Shouted out in TheAnimatedSeries when a thief is being pursued by both the guards and Aladdin himself. The scene is an almost shot-for-shot remake of the one from the move movie (before the singing), only the thief in question is nowhere near as good as Aladdin is, and stole a huge diamond ("All this for a diamond?").
21st May '16 5:30:57 PM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.

to:

* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
9th Mar '16 5:37:05 PM R1ck
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should the critically-panned Creator/ReeseWitherspoon and Creator/SofiaVergara film of the same name, nor "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]]", which is something else entirely.

to:

Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with LemmingCops and are poor drivers who crash very easily. Sometimes the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of police might use more advanced tactics like spike strips and roadblocks, but these rarely are successful in fiction, either against the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should heroes or the critically-panned Creator/ReeseWitherspoon and Creator/SofiaVergara film of the same name, nor "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]]", which is something else entirely.
villains.
8th Dec '15 10:01:16 PM Seanette
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder:Literature]]
* P.F. Chisholm's "Robert Carey" series of historical novels are set in the late 1500's, on what was then the disputed border between the kingdoms of England and Scotland. The titular Sir Robert Carey (commander of the English border guards), in ''A Surfeit of Guns'', is patrolling the border one night near Carlisle and intercepts a fugitive crossing from the Scottish side. A short time after, his patrol halts a Scottish incursion of armed men, who turn out to be on the King of Scotland's lawful business, allowing them by ancient right to cross into England in hot pursuit of one escaping from justice. Recognising they have the right, Carey releases the fugitive to them, despite his pleas for mercy. [[note]]His interest is aroused by the fugitive's account of ''why'' he is being chased, and he then investigates unofficially[[/note]]
* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Literature]]
* P.F. Chisholm's "Robert Carey" series of historical novels are set in the late 1500's, on what was then the disputed border between the kingdoms of England and Scotland. The titular Sir Robert Carey (commander of the English border guards), in ''A Surfeit of Guns'', is patrolling the border one night near Carlisle and intercepts a fugitive crossing from the Scottish side. A short time after, his patrol halts a Scottish incursion of armed men, who turn out to be on the King of Scotland's lawful business, allowing them by ancient right to cross into England in hot pursuit of one escaping from justice. Recognising they have the right, Carey releases the fugitive to them, despite his pleas for mercy. [[note]]His interest is aroused by the fugitive's account of ''why'' he is being chased, and he then investigates unofficially[[/note]]
* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
[[/folder]]
8th Jun '15 7:47:16 AM AgProv
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Literature]]
* P.F. Chisholm's "Robert Carey" series of historical novels are set in the late 1500's, on what was then the disputed border between the kingdoms of England and Scotland. The titular Sir Robert Carey (commander of the English border guards), in ''A Surfeit of Guns'', is patrolling the border one night near Carlisle and intercepts a fugitive crossing from the Scottish side. A short time after, his patrol halts a Scottish incursion of armed men, who turn out to be on the King of Scotland's lawful business, allowing them by ancient right to cross into England in hot pursuit of one escaping from justice. Recognising they have the right, Carey releases the fugitive to them, despite his pleas for mercy. [[note]]His interest is aroused by the fugitive's account of ''why'' he is being chased, and he then investigates unofficially[[/note]]
* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
[[/folder]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 35. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HotPursuit