History Main / HotPursuit

21st May '16 5:30:57 PM nighttrainfm
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* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.

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* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', ''Discworld/TheFifthElephant'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
9th Mar '16 5:37:05 PM R1ck
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Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should the critically-panned Creator/ReeseWitherspoon and Creator/SofiaVergara film of the same name, nor "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]]", which is something else entirely.

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Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with LemmingCops and are poor drivers who crash very easily. Sometimes the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of police might use more advanced tactics like spike strips and roadblocks, but these rarely are successful in fiction, either against the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should heroes or the critically-panned Creator/ReeseWitherspoon and Creator/SofiaVergara film of the same name, nor "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]]", which is something else entirely.
villains.
8th Dec '15 10:01:16 PM Seanette
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[[folder:Literature]]
* P.F. Chisholm's "Robert Carey" series of historical novels are set in the late 1500's, on what was then the disputed border between the kingdoms of England and Scotland. The titular Sir Robert Carey (commander of the English border guards), in ''A Surfeit of Guns'', is patrolling the border one night near Carlisle and intercepts a fugitive crossing from the Scottish side. A short time after, his patrol halts a Scottish incursion of armed men, who turn out to be on the King of Scotland's lawful business, allowing them by ancient right to cross into England in hot pursuit of one escaping from justice. Recognising they have the right, Carey releases the fugitive to them, despite his pleas for mercy. [[note]]His interest is aroused by the fugitive's account of ''why'' he is being chased, and he then investigates unofficially[[/note]]
* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
[[/folder]]


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[[folder:Literature]]
* P.F. Chisholm's "Robert Carey" series of historical novels are set in the late 1500's, on what was then the disputed border between the kingdoms of England and Scotland. The titular Sir Robert Carey (commander of the English border guards), in ''A Surfeit of Guns'', is patrolling the border one night near Carlisle and intercepts a fugitive crossing from the Scottish side. A short time after, his patrol halts a Scottish incursion of armed men, who turn out to be on the King of Scotland's lawful business, allowing them by ancient right to cross into England in hot pursuit of one escaping from justice. Recognising they have the right, Carey releases the fugitive to them, despite his pleas for mercy. [[note]]His interest is aroused by the fugitive's account of ''why'' he is being chased, and he then investigates unofficially[[/note]]
* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
[[/folder]]
8th Jun '15 7:47:16 AM AgProv
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Literature]]
* P.F. Chisholm's "Robert Carey" series of historical novels are set in the late 1500's, on what was then the disputed border between the kingdoms of England and Scotland. The titular Sir Robert Carey (commander of the English border guards), in ''A Surfeit of Guns'', is patrolling the border one night near Carlisle and intercepts a fugitive crossing from the Scottish side. A short time after, his patrol halts a Scottish incursion of armed men, who turn out to be on the King of Scotland's lawful business, allowing them by ancient right to cross into England in hot pursuit of one escaping from justice. Recognising they have the right, Carey releases the fugitive to them, despite his pleas for mercy. [[note]]His interest is aroused by the fugitive's account of ''why'' he is being chased, and he then investigates unofficially[[/note]]
* In Creator/TerryPratchett's ''{{Discworld}}'' novels, policeman Sam Vimes exploits this age-old right of "hot trod" twice. In ''Discworld/{{Thud}}'', he technically leads a pursuit across national borders in hot trod against the mad werewolf Wolfgang von Überwald - the local police recognise he has the right and stands back. And in ''Discworld/{{Snuff}}'', he claims the same right to investigate crime in the disputed Shires region; technically speaking, the Watch even pursue the criminals into Quirm and faraway Howondaland to make arrests.
[[/folder]]
9th May '15 6:46:30 PM RisefromYourGrave
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Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]], which is something else entirely.

to:

Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom the critically-panned Creator/ReeseWitherspoon and Creator/SofiaVergara film of the same name, nor "[[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]], fursuit]]", which is something else entirely.
17th Apr '15 10:39:28 AM DragonQuestZ
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->''"[[LampshadeHanging All this for a loaf of bread?]]"''

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->''"[[LampshadeHanging All ->''"All this for a loaf of bread?]]"''bread?"''
16th Mar '15 10:55:53 PM nombretomado
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Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should [[FurryFandom hot fursuit]], which is something else entirely.

to:

Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should [[FurryFandom [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom hot fursuit]], which is something else entirely.
6th Mar '15 11:59:15 PM Green_lantern40
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* ''Pinball/HighSpeed'' has the police give chase to the player for running a red light... at 146 mph.

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* ''Pinball/HighSpeed'' has the police car 504 give chase to the player for running a red light... light. Interesting to note the game was based on a RealLife incident involving its designer, Creator/SteveRitchie, when he was pulled over for driving through California's Interstate 5 at 146 mph.
2nd Jan '15 8:28:43 PM RisefromYourGrave
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Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the NeedForSpeed games of the same name. Or [[FurryFandom hot fursuit]], which is something else entirely.

to:

Police officers will engage in high speed pursuits involving dozens of patrol cars for the flimsiest of reasons. No TV police force has a "Do not pursue" policy for minor crimes. Officers involved in the chase are usually LemmingCops. Not to be confused with the NeedForSpeed ''VideoGame/NeedForSpeed'' games of the same name. Or name, despite being examples of this trope. Neither should [[FurryFandom hot fursuit]], which is something else entirely.
15th Dec '14 4:45:35 PM randomsurfer
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* Parodied in the extreme in ''TheBluesBrothers'' and ''{{Film/Taxi}} 2''. In the latter, insults about sexual tastes directed to some cops cause Paris' entire police force to chase down the main characters throughout the city (with predictably destructive results). In the former, running a red light is the catalyst for the titular Brothers to be chased down by every law enforcement agency in Illinois, up to and including the National Guard. They're also chased by [[ThoseWackyNazis Illinois Nazis]] and a renegade country band, but for different reasons.
** As in the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' example below, running a red light causes the cop who pulls the Blues Brothers over to notice that they have a ''massive'' record of major and minor traffic violation, in addition to "Joliet Jake" spending three years in prison for knocking over a liquor store. The really serious high speed pursuit comes after their initial attempt to escape from the police gets out of hand and they cause serious property damage. It's still an example of a case where the cops would be smarter to apply a "do not pursue" policy, but the initial red light is only the start of their problems.
*** Quite the opposite of "do not pursue", at one point early in the chase a police dispatcher calmly radios to all concerned that "the use of unnecessary violence in the apprehension of the Blues Brothers has been approved."

to:

* Parodied in the extreme in ''TheBluesBrothers'' and ''{{Film/Taxi}} 2''. In the latter, insults about sexual tastes directed to some cops cause Paris' entire police force to chase down the main characters throughout the city (with predictably destructive results). In the former, running ''TheBluesBrothers'':
** Running
a red light is the catalyst for the titular Brothers to be chased down by every law enforcement agency in Illinois, up to and including the National Guard. They're also chased by [[ThoseWackyNazis Illinois Nazis]] and a renegade country band, but for different reasons.
** As in the ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAuto'' example below, running a red light causes the cop who pulls the Blues Brothers over to notice that they have a ''massive'' record of major and minor traffic violation, in addition to "Joliet Jake" spending three years in prison for knocking over a liquor store. The really serious high speed pursuit comes after their initial attempt to escape from the police gets out of hand and they cause serious property damage. It's still an example of a case where the cops would be smarter to apply a "do not pursue" policy, but the initial red light is only the start of their problems.
*** Quite the opposite of "do not pursue", at one point early in the climactic chase a police dispatcher calmly radios to all concerned that "the use of unnecessary violence in the apprehension of the Blues Brothers has been approved.""
* Parodied again in ''{{Film/Taxi}} 2''. Insults about sexual tastes directed to some cops cause Paris' entire police force to chase down the main characters throughout the city (with predictably destructive results).



* ''Film/TheChase'' is basically made of one long HotPursuit with half a dozen police cruisers always keeping the same distance to the getaway car.

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* ''Film/TheChase'' is basically made of one long HotPursuit Hot Pursuit with half a dozen police cruisers always keeping the same distance to the getaway car.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HotPursuit