History Main / HotBlade

19th Nov '17 8:39:19 PM BattleMaster
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* Thermal swords, which presumably were super-heated based on the name, were the favored melee weapons of the Dinobots in Marvel's run of ''Franchise/TheTransformers'' G1 comics incarnation.
2nd Nov '17 3:16:55 PM CumbersomeBull
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* In real life, this is AwesomeButImpractical. As any blacksmith or metalworker can attest, steel loses its hardness the closer it gets to its melting point. [[https://www.crucible.com/eselector/general/generalpart4.html Special metallurgy that can mitigate this has existed since the 1930s or so]] with "high speed steels" - which were developed in response to modern industrialized machinery (like drills, end mills, ect.) becoming more capable and having higher RPMs. So, instead of finding roundabout solutions to the problem of drill bits heating up and dulling because of it, high speed steels were developed which simply retain their regular hardness at high temperatures with addition of molybdenum, tungsten and cobalt. With some of these steel alloys, ''operating'' temperatures in excess of 500°C (almost a thousand degrees Fahrenheit) are possible. More if you're willing to sacrifice some hardness. To make things even better for potential application of this, high-speed steels are popular in high-end cutlery and knife making. Steels like CPM M4 are becoming extremely popular because of how "hard" the steel can be ran (usually well above 60 HRC, which is about where most steels start to top out at before becoming too brittle - some alloys can almost reach 70 HRC, which is nearly on par with the higher end of ZDP-189) and it's wear resistance. Steels like CPM M4 and CPM Rex T15, especially, on a properly forged knife would seem like space voodoo magic to someone unaware that such capabilities were possible. Heating one up, however dangerous and unwise that would be to use, is certainly possible. However, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjSheQ7LgJ4 As this experiment tells]], while a RealLife HotBlade may ''look'' impressive in some stunt, cutting power is not much increased, even with incandescent 1000°F knife.

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* In real life, this is AwesomeButImpractical. As any blacksmith or metalworker can attest, steel loses its hardness the closer it gets to its melting point.
**
[[https://www.crucible.com/eselector/general/generalpart4.html Special metallurgy that can mitigate this has existed since the 1930s or so]] with "high speed steels" - which were developed in response to modern industrialized machinery (like drills, end mills, ect.) becoming more capable and having higher RPMs. So, instead of finding roundabout solutions to the problem of drill bits heating up and dulling because of it, high speed steels were developed which simply retain their regular hardness at high temperatures with addition of molybdenum, tungsten and cobalt. With some of these steel alloys, ''operating'' temperatures in excess of 500°C (almost a thousand degrees Fahrenheit) are possible. More if you're willing to sacrifice some hardness. To make things even better for potential application of this, high-speed steels are popular in high-end cutlery and knife making. Steels like CPM M4 are becoming extremely popular because of how "hard" the steel can be ran (usually well above 60 HRC, which is about where most steels start to top out at before becoming too brittle - some alloys can almost reach 70 HRC, which is nearly on par with the higher end of ZDP-189) and it's wear resistance. Steels like CPM M4 and CPM Rex T15, especially, on a properly forged knife would seem like space voodoo magic to someone unaware that such capabilities were possible. Heating one up, however dangerous and unwise that would be to use, is certainly possible.
***
However, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjSheQ7LgJ4 As this experiment tells]], while a RealLife HotBlade may ''look'' impressive in some stunt, cutting power is not much increased, even with incandescent 1000°F knife.knife.
**** Good luck trying to push-cut through a 20oz plastic soda bottle (with the cap still on, no less) with an ordinary kitchen knife that isn't heated enough to weaken the plastic you're push-cutting into... Or without using hundreds of pounds of force behind the cutting edge (which, while the person in the video was pushing with enough effort to cause straining, if the same blade in question was NOT heated they would not be doing much or any cutting at all like what you see here). It's not so much increasing the cutting power as it is making what your cutting easier to cut into... because it's melting.
21st Sep '17 6:50:38 AM GenkiMan
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** There's also Shura from the same arc who uses a Heat Javelin, a JoustingLance with a Heat Dial inside it that lets him stab and burn things simultaneously.
5th Jul '17 9:15:53 AM ChaoticNovelist
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* Actually not a good idea in real life, even if it were feasible; as any blacksmith or metalworker can attest, steel loses its hardness the closer it gets to its melting point. It'd take some very special metallurgy for the material to both glow white-hot ''and'' still be viable as a hard cutting edge.
** [[https://www.crucible.com/eselector/general/generalpart4.html Such special metallurgy has existed since the 1930s or so]] with "high speed steels" - which were developed in response to modern industrialized machinery (like drills, end mills, ect.) becoming more capable and having higher RPMs. So, instead of finding roundabout solutions to the problem of drill bits heating up and dulling because of it, high speed steels were developed which simply retain their regular hardness at high temperatures with addition of molybdenum, tungsten and cobalt. With some of these steel alloys, ''operating'' temperatures in excess of 500°C (almost a thousand degrees Fahrenheit) are possible. More if you're willing to sacrifice some hardness. To make things even better for potential application of this, high-speed steels are popular in high-end cutlery and knife making. Steels like CPM M4 are becoming extremely popular because of how "hard" the steel can be ran (usually well above 60 HRC, which is about where most steels start to top out at before becoming too brittle - some alloys can almost reach 70 HRC, which is nearly on par with the higher end of ZDP-189) and it's wear resistance. Steels like CPM M4 and CPM Rex T15, especially, on a properly forged knife would seem like space voodoo magic to someone unaware that such capabilities were possible. Heating one up, however dangerous and unwise that would be to use, is certainly possible.
** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjSheQ7LgJ4 As this experiment tells]], while a RealLife HotBlade may ''look'' impressive in some stunt, cutting power is not much increased, even with incandescent 1000°F knife.
* There once was a practice called "Blood Tempering," in which a red-hot blade is inserted by stab-wound and/or anally into a slave or prisoner of war, as it would cool the sword at body-temperature. This supposedly made the blades much stronger, and always killed the stab victim in practice.
** Almost never used, actually. And because the human body has such a wide variety of liquids and materials, it invariably created a blade with a poor, uneven temper that shattered easily. The practice was almost never maintained for any length of time in any culture, despite a moderately common myth.

to:

* Actually not a good idea in In real life, even if it were feasible; as this is AwesomeButImpractical. As any blacksmith or metalworker can attest, steel loses its hardness the closer it gets to its melting point. It'd take some very special metallurgy for the material to both glow white-hot ''and'' still be viable as a hard cutting edge.
**
[[https://www.crucible.com/eselector/general/generalpart4.html Such special Special metallurgy that can mitigate this has existed since the 1930s or so]] with "high speed steels" - which were developed in response to modern industrialized machinery (like drills, end mills, ect.) becoming more capable and having higher RPMs. So, instead of finding roundabout solutions to the problem of drill bits heating up and dulling because of it, high speed steels were developed which simply retain their regular hardness at high temperatures with addition of molybdenum, tungsten and cobalt. With some of these steel alloys, ''operating'' temperatures in excess of 500°C (almost a thousand degrees Fahrenheit) are possible. More if you're willing to sacrifice some hardness. To make things even better for potential application of this, high-speed steels are popular in high-end cutlery and knife making. Steels like CPM M4 are becoming extremely popular because of how "hard" the steel can be ran (usually well above 60 HRC, which is about where most steels start to top out at before becoming too brittle - some alloys can almost reach 70 HRC, which is nearly on par with the higher end of ZDP-189) and it's wear resistance. Steels like CPM M4 and CPM Rex T15, especially, on a properly forged knife would seem like space voodoo magic to someone unaware that such capabilities were possible. Heating one up, however dangerous and unwise that would be to use, is certainly possible.
**
possible. However, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjSheQ7LgJ4 As this experiment tells]], while a RealLife HotBlade may ''look'' impressive in some stunt, cutting power is not much increased, even with incandescent 1000°F knife.
* There once was a practice called "Blood Tempering," in which a red-hot blade is inserted by stab-wound and/or anally into a slave or prisoner of war, as it would cool the sword at body-temperature. This supposedly made the blades much stronger, and always killed the stab victim in practice.
** Almost never used, actually. And
practice. "There was once" is the phrase because no one does it anymore and even in the past it was uncommon. This is because the human body has such a wide variety of liquids and materials, it invariably created a blade with a poor, uneven temper that shattered easily. The practice It was almost never rarely maintained for any length of time in any culture, despite a moderately common myth.
28th May '17 3:25:47 PM nombretomado
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* Many Warhammer swords (at least in the way they are visually depicted), both ''WarhammerFantasy'' (Archaon) and ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ('''THE GOD-EMPEROR OF MANKIND'''), even when some flames might flicker depending on the artist, verging into FlamingSword territory.

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* Many Warhammer swords (at least in the way they are visually depicted), both ''WarhammerFantasy'' ''TabletopGame/WarhammerFantasy'' (Archaon) and ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' ('''THE GOD-EMPEROR OF MANKIND'''), even when some flames might flicker depending on the artist, verging into FlamingSword territory.
14th Mar '17 5:45:40 PM kazokuhouou
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* In ''VideoGame/YandereSimulator'', Yandere-chan has the option to heat up a knife blade with blowtorches. As of right now the effect is more cosmetic than of practical use...unless you want to turn it into a FlamingSword instead.
25th Feb '17 2:09:36 PM tennyson
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* In ''{{Anime/Kuromukuro}}'', [[FishOutOfTemporalWater Kennosuke,]] a samurai from the SengokuJidai, has a laser-edged katana that he took from an [[AncientAliens ogre.]] Recreated (sans laser) by [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q598DP27tGA Man At Arms]].
20th Feb '17 4:57:04 AM AceOfScarabs
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* [[VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures Sparkster the Rocket Knight]] sheathes his sword ''in'' his jetpack, and several of his stronger attackers have his sword glowing with a blue, orange, or red flare indicating that he traps the heat in his sword. One of the powerups he can find in ''RKA 2'' upgrades him outright to a FlamingSword.

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* [[VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures Sparkster the Rocket Knight]] sheathes his sword ''in'' his jetpack, and several of his stronger attackers attacks have his sword glowing with a blue, orange, or red flare indicating that he traps the heat in his sword. One of the powerups he can find in ''RKA 2'' upgrades him outright to a FlamingSword.
18th Feb '17 11:59:30 PM AceOfScarabs
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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures Sparkster the Rocket Knight]] sheathes his sword ''in'' his jetpack, and several of his stronger attackers have his sword glowing with a blue, orange, or red flare indicating that he traps the heat in his sword. One of the powerups he can find in ''RKA 2'' upgrades him outright to a FlamingSword.

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* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures [[VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures Sparkster the Rocket Knight]] sheathes his sword ''in'' his jetpack, and several of his stronger attackers have his sword glowing with a blue, orange, or red flare indicating that he traps the heat in his sword. One of the powerups he can find in ''RKA 2'' upgrades him outright to a FlamingSword.
18th Feb '17 11:58:55 PM AceOfScarabs
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to:

* [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/VideoGame/RocketKnightAdventures Sparkster the Rocket Knight]] sheathes his sword ''in'' his jetpack, and several of his stronger attackers have his sword glowing with a blue, orange, or red flare indicating that he traps the heat in his sword. One of the powerups he can find in ''RKA 2'' upgrades him outright to a FlamingSword.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HotBlade