History Main / HonestRollsCharacter

7th Apr '16 2:36:36 PM StFan
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* Used for nostalgia in the [[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]]'s [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0536.html Gary Gygax tribute strip]]. Roy and [[spoiler: his archon]] break out an old copy of the 1st Edition rulebooks for the occasion, which use the "3d6, in order" rule.

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* Used for nostalgia in ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'', with the [[Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick Order of the Stick]]'s [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0536.html Gary Gygax tribute strip]]. Roy and [[spoiler: his archon]] break out an old copy of the 1st 1[-[[superscript:st]]-] Edition rulebooks for the occasion, which use the "3d6, in order" rule.
2nd Feb '16 12:51:39 PM Koveras
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* ''TabletopGame/LaceAndSteel'' requires that you roll for all attributes in a specific order, although you do have some influence with the favoring/slighting LuckManipulationMechanic. In particular, you have to be very lucky to [[SuperpowerLottery roll high enough on your Magical aptitude stat AND draw a major arcana Significator]] to even play a magic-using character.
19th Sep '15 7:34:44 PM lluewhyn
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**The Dragonlance 1st Edition characters were this too. Since 3d6 rolled honestly would result in stats averaging 10.5 for a total around 63, all of the characters in the Dragons of Despair module (and main Dragonlance heroes) have stats totalling 75-90! It's also funny how their in-game stats differ from their portrayal in the novels.
***Raistlin is described as being incredibly unhealthy and (in the first books) very unlikeable, yet has a Constitution and Charisma of 10 each. Ironically, he also has a 17 Intelligence, which at the time was not high enough to cast 9th level spells and yet he was the most powerful wizard in history.
***Caramon is described as being fairly slow-witted and nonperceptive. He has a Wisdom of 10 (average) and an Intelligence of 12! Somewhat justified in that the Legends books show him to be a fairly intelligent general and good grasp of character once he steps out from his brother's shadow and realizes he can think for himself.
***Flint Fireforge, the wizened dwarf warrior, has an Intelligence of 7! Although he's described as more wise than smart, a 7 puts him at about Forrest Gump levels.
***Despite all of this, the actual module Dragons of Despair is ridiculously hard at points. One nearly impossible fight is with the Dragon Khisanth, who will kill any characters who fail their saves vs. Dragon breath. He also hovers above the party out of melee range and uses magical Darkness to keep the PCs from using ranged attacks back at him. I guess that's why the book shows the party being horribly outclassed, the Ranger dying, the dragon mysteriously leaving instead of finishing them off, and the Ranger being brought back to life through literal divine intervention. GM realized the encounter was a wee bit too powerful for even these "munchkin" characters. The term munchkin is used loosely, because even though the characters have high stats, 1st Edition was rougher still with requiring extremely high (15 or 16) values in stats before you saw any noticeable bonus. A character with straight 14s would require incredible luck, and yet gain very little above a character with straight 10s.
2nd Jun '15 9:45:38 AM ProfessorDetective
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* [[AvertedTrope Averted]] very hypocritically in many of the actual D&D NPC books, especially for 2nd Edition. For example, pick up the ForgottenRealms NPC guide: notice that it's very common for characters to have multiple 16s-18s in their starting scores. As the icing on the cake, this is after they spend several paragraphs in the Player's Handbook going on and on about the opportunities for roleplaying that a pathetically poor stat provides. Moral of the story: {{Mary Sue}}s are for game designers, not for players.\\
//
Third Edition is better about this. While some NPC characters might be as above, monsters are almost universally given strictly average stats (10s and 11s) before their racial bonuses are applied. The DMG also explicitly encourages the rerolling of characters whose stats are too below average, and makes the default rule "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" rather than 3d6, so above average results will be more common (and the default is that instead of rolling for each stat in order, you roll six times and ''then'' distribute the results to the stats -- this means that while you are still susceptible to getting results above or below average, you can at least make certain that the character's stats roughly fit the role you had in mind). It also lists several alternatives, such as using a "point buy" system or fixed stat array, changing these methods from HouseRules to officially sanctioned options. Fourth Edition actually makes point-buy the default, though the Player's Handbook mentions rolling as an alternative (if one slightly slanted to produce worse stats than one could buy, on average).

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* [[AvertedTrope Averted]] very hypocritically in many of the actual D&D NPC books, especially for 2nd Edition. For example, pick up the ForgottenRealms NPC guide: notice that it's very common for characters to have multiple 16s-18s in their starting scores. As the icing on the cake, this is after they spend several paragraphs in the Player's Handbook going on and on about the opportunities for roleplaying that a pathetically poor stat provides. Moral of the story: {{Mary Sue}}s are for game designers, not for players.\\
//
Third
players.
**Third
Edition is better about this. While some NPC characters might be as above, monsters are almost universally given strictly average stats (10s and 11s) before their racial bonuses are applied. The DMG also explicitly encourages the rerolling of characters whose stats are too below average, and makes the default rule "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" rather than 3d6, so above average results will be more common (and the default is that instead of rolling for each stat in order, you roll six times and ''then'' distribute the results to the stats -- this means that while you are still susceptible to getting results above or below average, you can at least make certain that the character's stats roughly fit the role you had in mind). It also lists several alternatives, such as using a "point buy" system or fixed stat array, changing these methods from HouseRules to officially sanctioned options. Fourth Edition actually makes point-buy the default, though the Player's Handbook mentions rolling as an alternative (if one slightly slanted to produce worse stats than one could buy, on average).
22nd Apr '15 11:32:19 PM BrainOnStandby
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** Also, at least in the Enhanced Edition, the game cheats in your favor so that the sum of your rolled stats is never lower than 75 points. Most rolls end up somewhere in the high 70s or low 80s, with mid to high 80s being rather common, while results in the low to mid 90s require some patience.

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** Also, at least in the Enhanced Edition, the game cheats in your favor so that the sum of your rolled stats is never lower than 75 points. Most rolls end up somewhere in the high 70s or low 80s, with mid to high 80s being rather common, while results in the low to mid 90s require some patience. And to make matter evens easier, the game displays the sum of your stats after each roll.
22nd Apr '15 11:30:04 PM BrainOnStandby
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** Also, at least in the Enhanced Edition, the game cheats in your favor so that the sum of your rolled stats is never lower than 75 points. Most rolls end up somewhere in the high 70s or low 80s, with mid to high 80s being rather common, while results in the low to mid 90s require some patience.
9th Apr '15 9:39:24 PM sablesword
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* First Edition AD&D actually averts this. "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest, rearrange as desired" is Method I of the four recommended methods for determining character attributes. "Honest rolls" is ''not'' a recommended method.
15th Jan '15 3:06:54 AM Medinoc
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* ''TabletopGame/{{FATAL}}'' rules include "the dice don't lie" and require honest rolls for your character for almost every trait except gender, including race, background, ''hair thickness'', and [[MemeticMutation anal circumference]]. It also heavily normalises the rolls, making anything significantly different from average nigh-impossible to get. And on the other hand, it is theoretically possible, if [[OneInAMillionChance very improbable]], to get physically impossible parameters. [[AlienGeometries Such as the aforementioned circumference being negative.]]

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* ''TabletopGame/{{FATAL}}'' rules include "the dice don't lie" and require honest rolls for your character for almost every trait except gender, including gender: This includes race, background, ''hair thickness'', hair thickness, ''alignment'', and [[MemeticMutation anal circumference]]. It also heavily normalises the rolls, making anything significantly different from average nigh-impossible to get. And on the other hand, it is theoretically possible, if [[OneInAMillionChance very improbable]], to get physically impossible parameters. [[AlienGeometries Such as the aforementioned circumference being negative.]]
10th Oct '14 2:19:04 AM Totema
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** Third Edition is better about this. While some NPC characters might be as above, monsters are almost universally given strictly average stats (10s and 11s) before their racial bonuses are applied. The DMG also explicitly encourages the rerolling of characters whose stats are too below average, and makes the default rule "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" rather than 3d6, so above average results will be more common (and the default is that instead of rolling for each stat in order, you roll six times and ''then'' distribute the results to the stats -- this means that while you are still susceptible to getting results above or below average, you can at least make certain that the character's stats roughly fit the role you had in mind). It also lists several alternatives, such as using a "point buy" system or fixed stat array, changing these methods from HouseRules to officially sanctioned options. Fourth Edition actually makes point-buy the default, though the Player's Handbook mentions rolling as an alternative (if one slightly slanted to produce worse stats than one could buy, on average).

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** //
Third Edition is better about this. While some NPC characters might be as above, monsters are almost universally given strictly average stats (10s and 11s) before their racial bonuses are applied. The DMG also explicitly encourages the rerolling of characters whose stats are too below average, and makes the default rule "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" rather than 3d6, so above average results will be more common (and the default is that instead of rolling for each stat in order, you roll six times and ''then'' distribute the results to the stats -- this means that while you are still susceptible to getting results above or below average, you can at least make certain that the character's stats roughly fit the role you had in mind). It also lists several alternatives, such as using a "point buy" system or fixed stat array, changing these methods from HouseRules to officially sanctioned options. Fourth Edition actually makes point-buy the default, though the Player's Handbook mentions rolling as an alternative (if one slightly slanted to produce worse stats than one could buy, on average).
10th Oct '14 2:18:44 AM Totema
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\\
Third Edition is better about this. While some NPC characters might be as above, monsters are almost universally given strictly average stats (10s and 11s) before their racial bonuses are applied. The DMG also explicitly encourages the rerolling of characters whose stats are too below average, and makes the default rule "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" rather than 3d6, so above average results will be more common (and the default is that instead of rolling for each stat in order, you roll six times and ''then'' distribute the results to the stats -- this means that while you are still susceptible to getting results above or below average, you can at least make certain that the character's stats roughly fit the role you had in mind). It also lists several alternatives, such as using a "point buy" system or fixed stat array, changing these methods from HouseRules to officially sanctioned options. Fourth Edition actually makes point-buy the default, though the Player's Handbook mentions rolling as an alternative (if one slightly slanted to produce worse stats than one could buy, on average).
* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' also adopted the "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" as its standard character creation rule, but there are a couple of other options available, including the tournament standard of points buy.

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\\
Third
**Third Edition is better about this. While some NPC characters might be as above, monsters are almost universally given strictly average stats (10s and 11s) before their racial bonuses are applied. The DMG also explicitly encourages the rerolling of characters whose stats are too below average, and makes the default rule "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" rather than 3d6, so above average results will be more common (and the default is that instead of rolling for each stat in order, you roll six times and ''then'' distribute the results to the stats -- this means that while you are still susceptible to getting results above or below average, you can at least make certain that the character's stats roughly fit the role you had in mind). It also lists several alternatives, such as using a "point buy" system or fixed stat array, changing these methods from HouseRules to officially sanctioned options. Fourth Edition actually makes point-buy the default, though the Player's Handbook mentions rolling as an alternative (if one slightly slanted to produce worse stats than one could buy, on average).
* ''TabletopGame/{{Pathfinder}}'' also adopted the "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" as its standard character creation rule, but there are a couple of other options available, including the tournament standard of points buy. Fifth Edition returns to "Roll 4d6 and drop the lowest" as the standard method, but also endorses a specific point buy systems, including a premade stat array.
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