History Main / HollywoodEncryption

30th Jul '16 11:52:28 AM nombretomado
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* In ''Literature/DigitalFortress'' the NSA has a computer which is powerful enough to brute force (i.e. keep trying different passkeys until it gets the right answer) encryption. The plot is based around a new encryption algorithm which is resistant to brute force methods. This is a clear case of [[PasswordSlotMachine research failure]], since a brute force search for a solution would try every possible key until the right one was found.

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* In ''Literature/DigitalFortress'' by Dan Brown, the NSA has a computer which is powerful enough to brute force (i.e. keep trying different passkeys until it gets the right answer) encryption. The plot is based around a new encryption algorithm which is resistant to brute force methods. This is a clear case of [[PasswordSlotMachine research failure]], since a brute force search for a solution would try every possible key until the right one was found.



* In Desmond Bagley's ''The Tightrope Men'', the hero is captured and being questioned by enemy agents, who want to know about the high-tech whatsit he's believed to be working on. However, he's only impersonating the scientist they think he is, and he didn't get a proper briefing, so he's at a loss. Then, abruptly, he comes out with a spray of technobabble about a computer which can brute-force encryption like the one in the DanBrown example above. This scares the life out of him, because he doesn't even understand what he's saying, but it ''does'' make sense to people who know computers, so he wonders where the hell this sudden burst of information ''came from''. Incidentally, the scientist he's posing as was ''actually'' looking into a possible design for an X-ray laser, nothing to do with computers at all.

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* In Desmond Bagley's ''The Tightrope Men'', the hero is captured and being questioned by enemy agents, who want to know about the high-tech whatsit he's believed to be working on. However, he's only impersonating the scientist they think he is, and he didn't get a proper briefing, so he's at a loss. Then, abruptly, he comes out with a spray of technobabble about a computer which can brute-force encryption like the one in the DanBrown Creator/DanBrown example above. This scares the life out of him, because he doesn't even understand what he's saying, but it ''does'' make sense to people who know computers, so he wonders where the hell this sudden burst of information ''came from''. Incidentally, the scientist he's posing as was ''actually'' looking into a possible design for an X-ray laser, nothing to do with computers at all.
23rd Jul '16 2:16:10 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* Averted on ''Film/{{Blackhat}}'': The good guys manage to intercept an electronic message sent by the bad guys, but Hathaway (the PlayfulHacker BoxedCrook hero) points out once one of the agents asks him to decrypt the message that the message utilizes a 512-bit [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Privacy_Guard GPG]] code-theoretically, he ''would'' be able to crack it given enough time, but the "enough time" he's talking about is of a few ''months'' and they have ''at least'' hours remaining before the bad guys strike. They nearly give up on the lead as a result.



[[AC:{{Film}}]]
* Averted on ''Film/{{Blackhat}}'': The good guys manage to intercept an electronic message sent by the bad guys, but Hathaway (the PlayfulHacker BoxedCrook hero) points out once one of the agents asks him to decrypt the message that the message utilizes a 512-bit [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Privacy_Guard GPG]] code-theoretically, he ''would'' be able to crack it given enough time, but the "enough time" he's talking about is of a few ''months'' and they have ''at least'' hours remaining before the bad guys strike. They nearly give up on the lead as a result.

4th Jun '16 5:43:08 PM Pinokio
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* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple dozens of computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, or setting up something like a botnet or server cluster, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.

to:

* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple dozens of computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, or setting up something like a botnet or server cluster, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual encryption key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.
12th May '16 8:54:15 AM AceOfScarabs
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\n* Averted realistically in ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork''. [=MegaMan.EXE=] cannot crack open the heavily-encrypted Purple Mystery Data item containers he can find while traveling the Internet with his own abilities, and has to resort to purpose-built Unlocker sub-programs to unpack them. He also cannot spoof security certificates to enter heavy-security zones and has to retrieve passwords, ID data, and security certificates to get past these barriers.

26th Mar '16 4:37:55 PM SovereignGFC
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Added DiffLines:

* Justified in ''FanFic/HeroesOfTheDeskRepercussions'' since the tech doing the cracking is hundreds of years more advanced (2500s versus 2015) and specifically issued to people whose job it is to break into places (Ghosts like [[SuperSoldier Nova Terra]]).
18th Mar '16 1:57:27 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''TheSarahConnorChronicles'': Of course John can break the encryption of Sarkissian's hdd.

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* ''TheSarahConnorChronicles'': ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'': Of course John can break the encryption of Sarkissian's hdd.
3rd Mar '16 5:26:49 PM Pinokio
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* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple dozens of computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.

to:

* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple dozens of computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, or setting up something like a botnet or server cluster, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.
3rd Mar '16 5:24:00 PM Pinokio
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* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.

to:

* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple dozens of computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.
3rd Mar '16 5:15:24 PM Pinokio
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to:

* ''Film/{{Swordfish}}'': Stanley is shown a "Restricted Access Only" password screen. The screen conveniently says that it is using DES (Data Encryption Standard) 128-bit encryption. Then Gabriel says it is actually 512-bit encryption, and asks Stanley to use a worm, that acts as multiple worms, to find "digital footprints" throughout an encrypted network. Stanley is told to do this in sixty seconds, and already wastes the first fourteen seconds. In terms of cracking, 128-bit and 512-bit encryption bring to mind multiple computers simultaneously attempting to brute force a password over a period of days or months. Over the next minute, Stanley does not appear to be manually entering passwords, or automating the process of entering passwords by running a program, which would take too long to accomplish in under a minute. It is likely Stanley is not actually cracking, but is actually hacking, and HollywoodHacking is pretty close to magic, which in this case, means Stanley is doing whatever it is that will bring about the result that will happen to be successful. This could be as simple as opening and running the program, and letting it do what it does, while navigating the interface of the operating system. On screen, this appears as some jumbled C code, hopefully written beforehand, which may take a couple seconds to compile, if needed, and though it appears incorrect, it makes perfect sense to the program meant to interpret the code. The incomprehensible geometric interface is doing what it's supposed to, the impossible IP addresses work just fine because they refer to super duper secret computers that use those addresses, and the PERL script is also doing whatever it's supposed to do. Because, this is more about file transfer than it is about hacking. You see, a Vernam cipher, or One-Time Pad, is not going to be cracked. It will require the actual key. Now, both the computer and the network are encrypted. So, before this fancy worm gets on the network and searches for the key, unsecured, on someone's computer, let's say it already knows the key, and Stanley already knows the password and isn't telling anyone, because this movie is full of double-crossing and by the end you don't have information about what the hell's going on, giving Stanley all the time he needs to enter the correct password.
30th Jan '16 1:06:54 AM marcoasalazarm
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* Averted on ''Film/{{Blackhat}}'': The good guys manage to intercept an electronic message sent by the bad guys, but Hathaway (the PlayfulHacker BoxedCrook hero) points out once one of the agents asks him to decrypt the message that the message utilizes a 512-bit [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Privacy_Guard GPG]] code-theoretically, he ''would'' be able to crack it in time, but it would take him at least a few ''months'' and they have ''at least'' hours remaining before the bad guys strike. They nearly give up on the lead as a result.


to:

* Averted on ''Film/{{Blackhat}}'': The good guys manage to intercept an electronic message sent by the bad guys, but Hathaway (the PlayfulHacker BoxedCrook hero) points out once one of the agents asks him to decrypt the message that the message utilizes a 512-bit [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GNU_Privacy_Guard GPG]] code-theoretically, he ''would'' be able to crack it in given enough time, but it would take him at least the "enough time" he's talking about is of a few ''months'' and they have ''at least'' hours remaining before the bad guys strike. They nearly give up on the lead as a result.

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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HollywoodEncryption