History Main / HollywoodDarkness

16th May '18 1:27:20 PM Twiddler
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** ''Manga/TheVanishingOfNagatoYukiChan'' AlternateUniverse spin-off manga's take on that moment shows Haruhi could see perfectly fine [[spoiler:and recognizes Kyon right away even after several years]], but doesn't let on about it. Haruhi and Yuki also have a similar first meeting where the darkness, Yuki's nearsightedness (she went out without her glasses), and a lack of an impression made on Haruhi really did make it hard for each to identify the other later.

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** ''Manga/TheVanishingOfNagatoYukiChan'' ''Manga/TheDisappearanceOfNagatoYukiChan'' AlternateUniverse spin-off manga's take on that moment shows Haruhi could see perfectly fine [[spoiler:and recognizes Kyon right away even after several years]], but doesn't let on about it. Haruhi and Yuki also have a similar first meeting where the darkness, Yuki's nearsightedness (she went out without her glasses), and a lack of an impression made on Haruhi really did make it hard for each to identify the other later.
4th May '18 2:22:39 PM Pseudoname
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* In ''Tabletopgame/{{Pathfinder}}'' just about every race has darkvision or the ability to see twice as far with a light source as humans can. For those without either, one can always buy/make some darkvision magic item or use a spell to get the bonus temporarily. The end result is that pitch darkness is as bothersome as a shadow in midday by around fifth level.
29th Apr '18 10:41:42 PM JoeMerl
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* In ''Film/{{Casper}},'' when Carrigan and Dibs first enter the manor at night, the audience can see the room fine, but Carrigan snaps for Dibs to use his lighter. This adds virtually no illumination to the vast room, but it's suddenly treated as if they can see everything fine.
27th Apr '18 4:36:54 AM Spindriver
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* The play ''Black Comedy'' by Peter Shaffer is constructed around an electrical blackout in an apartment. The first few minutes of the play are done with no lights but the characters act as if the apartment were fully illuminated; then the blackout occurs ó and the lights go up full while the actors pretend they can't see. Whenever someone lights a match or turns on a torch, the stage lights are dimmed slightly. At the very end of the play, the lights are fixed by a maintenance guy who turns them "on," at which point the closing blackout occurs. Typically, this is explained in the playbill or program, or in a curtain speech, so that the audience understands what's going on ó although itís easy enough to pick up on the idea anyway.

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* The play ''Black Comedy'' by Peter Shaffer Creator/PeterShaffer is constructed around an electrical blackout in an apartment. The first few minutes of the play are done with no lights but the characters act as if the apartment were fully illuminated; then the blackout occurs ó and the lights go up full while the actors pretend they can't see. Whenever someone lights a match or turns on a torch, the stage lights are dimmed slightly. At the very end of the play, the lights are fixed by a maintenance guy who turns them "on," at which point the closing blackout occurs. Typically, this is explained in the playbill or program, or in a curtain speech, so that the audience understands what's going on ó although itís easy enough to pick up on the idea anyway.
27th Apr '18 4:33:12 AM Spindriver
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* A standard way to portray a night scene in theatre is to use a dark blue filter on the stage lights.
** This is lampshaded in ''Theatre/TheDrowsyChaperone'' when the Man in the Chair mentions that "[Janet] is bathed in the pale blue light of a sympathetic moon ... which is ridiculous, because it's the middle of the day".

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* A standard way to portray a night scene in theatre is to use a dark blue filter on the stage lights.
**
lights. This is lampshaded in ''Theatre/TheDrowsyChaperone'' when the Man in the Chair mentions that "[Janet] is bathed in the pale blue light of a sympathetic moon ... which is ridiculous, because it's the middle of the day".



* The play ''Black Comedy''by Peter Shaffer is constructed around an electrical blackout in an apartment. The first few minutes of the play are done with no lights but the characters act as if the apartment were fully illuminated; then the blackout occurs ó and the lights go up full while the actors pretend they can't see. At the very end of the play, the lights are fixed and the maintenance guy turns them "on," at which point the closing blackout occurs. Typically, this is explained in the playbill or program, or in a curtain speech, so that the audience understands what's going on ó although itís easy enough to pick up on the idea anyway.

to:

* The play ''Black Comedy''by Comedy'' by Peter Shaffer is constructed around an electrical blackout in an apartment. The first few minutes of the play are done with no lights but the characters act as if the apartment were fully illuminated; then the blackout occurs ó and the lights go up full while the actors pretend they can't see. Whenever someone lights a match or turns on a torch, the stage lights are dimmed slightly. At the very end of the play, the lights are fixed and the by a maintenance guy who turns them "on," at which point the closing blackout occurs. Typically, this is explained in the playbill or program, or in a curtain speech, so that the audience understands what's going on ó although itís easy enough to pick up on the idea anyway.
27th Apr '18 4:30:40 AM Spindriver
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** In ''Discworld/MovingPictures'' the nascent movie industry is struggling with night scenes: the camera imps can't see to paint at night. Victor comes up with the idea of explaining the situation away in the dialogue card: "How bright the moon is tonight, bwana." This later turns out to be one of the [[TheoryOfNarrativeCausality Laws of Holy Wood]]: It is always bright enough to see the darkness.
*** Later on they come even closer to this trope, when it's discovered that they can illuminate the scene with torches so that the imps can see but it's still recognisably night.

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** In ''Discworld/MovingPictures'' the nascent movie industry is struggling with night scenes: the camera imps can't see to paint at night. Victor comes up with the idea of explaining the situation away in the dialogue card: "How bright the moon is tonight, bwana." This later eventually turns out to be one of the [[TheoryOfNarrativeCausality Laws of Holy Wood]]: It is always bright enough to see the darkness.
***
darkness. Later on they come even closer to this the trope, when it's discovered that they can illuminate the scene with torches so that the imps can see but it's still recognisably night.



* The play ''Black Comedy'' concerns a blackout. The first few minutes of the play are done with no lights but the characters act as if the apartment were fully illuminated; then there's a blackout and the lights go up full while the actors pretend they can't see. The very end of the play the lights are fixed and someone turns them "on," at which point the closing blackout occurs. Typically, this is explained in the playbill or program, or in a curtain speech, so that the audience understands what's going on.

to:

* The play ''Black Comedy'' concerns a blackout. Comedy''by Peter Shaffer is constructed around an electrical blackout in an apartment. The first few minutes of the play are done with no lights but the characters act as if the apartment were fully illuminated; then there's a the blackout occurs ó and the lights go up full while the actors pretend they can't see. The At the very end of the play play, the lights are fixed and someone the maintenance guy turns them "on," at which point the closing blackout occurs. Typically, this is explained in the playbill or program, or in a curtain speech, so that the audience understands what's going on.on ó although itís easy enough to pick up on the idea anyway.
13th Apr '18 6:01:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* An ''WesternAnimation/ActionMan'' game for the Game Boy Color averted this for objectives involving a cave in the Jungle stage. If you don't have the flashlight to traverse the cave, the screen will gradually get darker as you try to head towards its entrance, eventually reaching near-pitch-black and preventing you from entering. The Mine stage similarly has no qualms about dumping you into complete darkness if you shoot out the lights, [[DevelopersForesight unless you bring the otherwise-unneeded flashlight with you]].

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* An ''WesternAnimation/ActionMan'' ''Franchise/ActionMan'' game for the Game Boy Color averted this for objectives involving a cave in the Jungle stage. If you don't have the flashlight to traverse the cave, the screen will gradually get darker as you try to head towards its entrance, eventually reaching near-pitch-black and preventing you from entering. The Mine stage similarly has no qualms about dumping you into complete darkness if you shoot out the lights, [[DevelopersForesight unless you bring the otherwise-unneeded flashlight with you]].
6th Apr '18 2:38:12 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Creator/{{Taito}}'s arcade flight simulator ''Midnight Landing'' is set at midnight, with only the city lights and runway lights visible. Justified, as the game was released in 1987 when 3D technology was very limited, so [[SerendipityWritesThePlot the developers chose to use lights in a late night setting to provide a sense of altitude without having to invest in expensive graphical hardware]]. However, since buildings aren't rendered, each stage looks as if you're landing on a bare runway in the middle of nowhere.

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* Creator/{{Taito}}'s arcade flight simulator ''Midnight Landing'' ''[[VideoGame/LandingSeries Midnight Landing]]'' is set at midnight, with only the city lights and runway lights visible. Justified, as the game was released in 1987 when 3D technology was very limited, so [[SerendipityWritesThePlot the developers chose to use lights in a late night setting to provide a sense of altitude without having to invest in expensive graphical hardware]]. However, since buildings aren't rendered, each stage looks as if you're landing on a bare runway in the middle of nowhere.
15th Mar '18 7:39:55 PM LucaEarlgrey
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* Creator/{{Taito}}'s arcade flight simulator ''Midnight Landing'' is set at midnight, with only the city lights and runway lights visible. Justified, as the game was released in 1987 when 3D technology was very limited, so the developers chose to use lights in a late night setting to provide a sense of altitude without having to invest in expensive graphical hardware. Since buildings aren't rendered, each stage looks as if you're landing on a bare runway in the middle of nowhere.

to:

* Creator/{{Taito}}'s arcade flight simulator ''Midnight Landing'' is set at midnight, with only the city lights and runway lights visible. Justified, as the game was released in 1987 when 3D technology was very limited, so [[SerendipityWritesThePlot the developers chose to use lights in a late night setting to provide a sense of altitude without having to invest in expensive graphical hardware. Since hardware]]. However, since buildings aren't rendered, each stage looks as if you're landing on a bare runway in the middle of nowhere.
12th Mar '18 5:45:10 PM nombretomado
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* Averted in ''TheWitcher'' where you need a special potion in order to see in dungeons and other underground spaces.

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* Averted in ''TheWitcher'' ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'' where you need a special potion in order to see in dungeons and other underground spaces.
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