History Main / HollywoodCuisine

6th Oct '17 3:23:22 PM SuperTulle
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*** Norway: Bland.

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*** Norway: Bland. Fish everywhere.
5th Oct '17 4:11:16 PM NNinja
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** People from certain parts of the American Midwest--especially around Detroit--may also know paczki (basically, jelly doughnuts).

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** People from certain parts of the American Midwest--especially around Detroit--may also know paczki pączki[[labelnote:pronouciation]]poh-tch-kee[[/labelnote]] (basically, jelly doughnuts).
13th Sep '17 12:01:10 PM crazysamaritan
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** A more general one for all British countries (plus Ireland) is "Breakfast": the greasy kind with bacon, eggs, potatoes, sausages, and tomatoes all [[BaconAddiction cooked in bacon fat]], plus baked beans and local bread (possibly toasted in bacon fat) and a slice of fried black pudding (probably [[RunningGag cooked in bacon fat]]). Each region has its own variation (for instance, the Welsh include cockles and laver bread--both of which are rather likely to be [[OverlyLongGag fried in bacon fat]]--while the Scots occasionally use haggis for the sausage, and in both Northern Ireland and the Republic the bread is usually soda bread), but to quote Creator/WSomersetMaugham:

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** A more general one for all British countries (plus Ireland) is "Breakfast": the greasy kind with bacon, eggs, potatoes, sausages, and tomatoes all [[BaconAddiction cooked in bacon fat]], fat, plus baked beans and local bread (possibly toasted in bacon fat) and a slice of fried black pudding (probably [[RunningGag cooked in bacon fat]]). Each region has its own variation (for instance, the Welsh include cockles and laver bread--both of which are rather likely to be [[OverlyLongGag fried in bacon fat]]--while the Scots occasionally use haggis for the sausage, and in both Northern Ireland and the Republic the bread is usually soda bread), but to quote Creator/WSomersetMaugham:
20th Aug '17 5:06:14 PM karstovich2
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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are three truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli'', which means "with olive oil"). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.

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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are three truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish it. If meatless, these vegetable will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called (called ''zeytinyağli'', which means "with olive oil").oil"); the most famous is probably the eggplant dish ''Imam bayilidi'' ("the Imam fainted", supposedly because it was invented by a woman whose husband, an imam, fainted when he found out how much olive oil went into the dish). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.
31st Jul '17 9:00:34 PM karstovich2
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** Although Canadians do eat Canadian bacon, (1) most bacon in Canada is streaky bacon like in the US and (2) they don't call it "Canadian bacon", but rather simply "back bacon." The association of back bacon with Canada may come from a real affinity in Southern Ontario, and particularly the UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} area, for peameal bacon, a particular kind of back bacon (historically rolled in ground dried peas and today generally rolled in cornmeal) originally developed in 19th-century Toronto. Although it is not the usual, day-to-day sort of bacon for Torontonians, there is a definite pride in peameal bacon in Hogtown: any self-respecting breakfast place has a dish featuring the stuff, and sandwiches featuring thin slices of crispy-on-the-outside, just-warmed-through peameal bacon are the signature of the city's famous St. Lawrence Market.

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** Although Canadians do eat Canadian bacon, (1) most bacon in Canada is streaky bacon like in the US and (2) they don't call it "Canadian bacon", but rather simply "back bacon." The association of back bacon with Canada may come from a real affinity in Southern Ontario, and particularly the UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} area, for peameal bacon, a particular kind of back bacon (historically rolled in ground dried peas and today generally rolled in cornmeal) originally developed in 19th-century Toronto. Although it is not the usual, day-to-day sort of bacon for Torontonians, there is a definite pride in peameal bacon in Hogtown: any self-respecting breakfast place has a dish featuring the stuff, and sandwiches featuring thin slices of crispy-on-the-outside, just-warmed-through just-warmed-through-on-the-inside peameal bacon are the signature of the city's famous St. Lawrence Market.
31st Jul '17 8:59:49 PM karstovich2
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** Although Canadians do eat Canadian bacon, (1) most bacon in Canada is streaky bacon like in the US and (2) they don't call it "Canadian bacon", but rather simply "back bacon." The association of back bacon with Canada may come from a real affinity in Southern Ontario, and particularly the UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} area, for peameal bacon, a particular kind of back bacon (historically rolled in ground dried peas and today generally rolled in cornmeal) originally developed in 19th-century Toronto.

to:

** Although Canadians do eat Canadian bacon, (1) most bacon in Canada is streaky bacon like in the US and (2) they don't call it "Canadian bacon", but rather simply "back bacon." The association of back bacon with Canada may come from a real affinity in Southern Ontario, and particularly the UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} area, for peameal bacon, a particular kind of back bacon (historically rolled in ground dried peas and today generally rolled in cornmeal) originally developed in 19th-century Toronto. Although it is not the usual, day-to-day sort of bacon for Torontonians, there is a definite pride in peameal bacon in Hogtown: any self-respecting breakfast place has a dish featuring the stuff, and sandwiches featuring thin slices of crispy-on-the-outside, just-warmed-through peameal bacon are the signature of the city's famous St. Lawrence Market.
31st Jul '17 8:41:36 PM karstovich2
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*** Memphis and Carolinas: Southern style BBQ

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*** Memphis and Carolinas: Southern style BBQSouthern-style barbecue. Within these, there's a difference between Memphis (where the focus is on ribs) and the Carolinas (which love ribs, but love shoulders and whole pigs even more), and within the Carolinas there's a difference between eastern North Carolina, western North Carolina, and South Carolina over what part of pig, if any, should be favored, and what the sauce should contain (with tomato being the major point of contention).
31st Jul '17 8:35:19 PM karstovich2
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Added DiffLines:

** Since the 1990s, South African cookery has gotten a reputation for spiciness through its plethora of sauces based on peri-peri (African birdseye chilli). While these are popular in SA, they are actually [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff imports from neighbouring Mozambique]], which is also responsible for one of the most popular things to put the hot sauce on (flame-grilled spicy-marinated chicken).
31st Jul '17 8:15:30 PM karstovich2
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*** One of the better-known African rice dishes is Jollof rice. This West African specialty is a kind of pilaf, and is characterized by being red (as it always includes tomatoes or tomato paste and red palm oil) and usually being spicy. Vegetables and/or meat may be added. Though the dish most likely has its most ancient roots in the Senegal/Gambia region, it is the subject of particular national pride (and arguments) in Nigeria and Ghana.

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*** One of the better-known African rice dishes is Jollof rice. This West African specialty is a kind of pilaf, and is characterized by being red (as it always includes tomatoes or tomato paste and red palm oil) and usually being spicy. Vegetables and/or meat may be added. Though the dish most likely has its most ancient roots in the Senegal/Gambia region, it is the subject of particular national pride (and arguments) in Nigeria and Ghana.Ghana; if a writer wants to give some West African characters a chance to do some SeinfeldianConversation or a CavemenVsAstronautsDebate, Jollof rice is a pretty good subject.
31st Jul '17 8:12:12 PM karstovich2
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*** West Africa is also noted for its use of groundnut (i.e. peanut)[[note]]Before the Columbian Exchange, West Africa was home to the Bambara groundnut, a close cousin of the peanut that has similar uses. However, when the New World peanut arrived in West Africa, it quickly became dominant, as it grows more easily and has higher yields than the Bambara groundnut. The old groundnut still exists, but its cultivation is much reduced.[[/note]] either alone or with meat.
** North Africa gets a slightly better press. They had the Muslim Middle East and then the French influence. Couscous, roasted vegetables, lamb... delicious, spicy curries... that yummy tea with mint in it.

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*** West Africa is also noted for its use of groundnut (i.e. peanut)[[note]]Before the Columbian Exchange, West Africa was home to the Bambara groundnut, a close cousin of the peanut that has similar uses. However, when the New World peanut arrived in West Africa, it quickly became dominant, as it grows more easily and has higher yields than the Bambara groundnut. The old groundnut still exists, but its cultivation is much reduced.[[/note]] either alone ground up into a savory sauce and eaten over fufu or rice with vegetables or meat.
** Rice is also common across Africa. This should come as no surprise, as one of the ancestor species of modern rice is from Africa.
*** One of the better-known African rice dishes is Jollof rice. This West African specialty is a kind of pilaf, and is characterized by being red (as it always includes tomatoes or tomato paste and red palm oil) and usually being spicy. Vegetables and/or meat may be added. Though the dish most likely has its most ancient roots in the Senegal/Gambia region, it is the subject of particular national pride (and arguments) in Nigeria and Ghana.
** North Africa gets a slightly better good press. They had the Muslim Middle East and then the French influence. Couscous, roasted vegetables, lamb... delicious, spicy curries... that yummy tea with mint in it.
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