History Main / HollywoodCuisine

30th Oct '16 2:21:03 PM IzzyMaleficent
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** Welsh: Lamb, and of course Welsh rarebit (more authentically Welsh rabbit, [[TakeThat which is a joke]] and makes more sense), a thick sauce of cheese, beer and mustard, spread on toast and browned under the grill. Cheese in general (especially Caerphilly, the only Welsh cheese most can name)--the English have been joking about the Welsh fondness for cheese since at least the 16th century. Lesser known are "laver" (a type of seaweed, often used to make "laver bread"--which is kind of [[NonindicativeName nonindicative]], as it consists of laver boiled and minced till it turns to jelly, rolled in oatmeal, and then fried) and cawl (a type of meat and vegetable stew, also used as the modern Welsh word for "soup").

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** Welsh: Lamb, leeks, and of course Welsh rarebit (more authentically Welsh rabbit, [[TakeThat which is a joke]] and makes more sense), a thick sauce of cheese, beer and mustard, spread on toast and browned under the grill. Cheese in general (especially Caerphilly, the only Welsh cheese most can name)--the English have been joking about the Welsh fondness for cheese since at least the 16th century. Lesser known are "laver" (a type of seaweed, often used to make "laver bread"--which is kind of [[NonindicativeName nonindicative]], as it consists of laver boiled and minced till it turns to jelly, rolled in oatmeal, and then fried) and cawl (a type of meat and vegetable stew, also used as the modern Welsh word for "soup").
24th Oct '16 8:18:16 PM karstovich2
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** On the Internet Russians are often portrayed as mayonnaise fiends. To an extent, [[TruthInTelevision many of them are]]: Russia leads the mayonnaise consumption in Europe, and many Russians use mayo with ''everything'', just like the Yanks do with ketchup (which they also like). Some even use it instead of sour cream and/or bechamel[[note]]Helped by the fact that the modern processed mayo ''is'' more of a bechamel than the mayonnaise, with its starch and gum thickeners[[/note]], and if a recipe calls for the oil and egg yolk, they ''will'' try to replace them with mayo to simplify cooking. [[CordonBleughChef Sometimes it even works]]. The aforementioned faux-French casserole is a prime example of that. To be fair, in Russia itself the mayonnaise-lovers, while certainly existing, are often made fun of and looked down on by others, so much so that there are even several online communities where ridiculous mayonnaise-featuring recipes are collected and, again, made fun of.

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** On the Internet Russians are often portrayed as mayonnaise fiends. To an extent, [[TruthInTelevision many of them are]]: Russia leads the mayonnaise consumption in Europe, and many Russians use mayo with ''everything'', just like the Yanks do with ketchup (which they also like). Some even use it instead of sour cream and/or bechamel[[note]]Helped by the fact that the modern processed mayo ''is'' more of a bechamel than the mayonnaise, with its starch and gum thickeners[[/note]], and if a recipe calls for the oil and egg yolk, they ''will'' try to replace them with mayo to simplify cooking. [[CordonBleughChef Sometimes it even works]]. The aforementioned faux-French casserole is a prime example of that.that (the original, which was invented by a French chef in the employ of the Russian ambassador to France, calls for slices of braised veal to be layered with béchamel, topped with cheese, and then baked; "French Meat" uses cheaper cuts and typically substitutes mayo for the béchamel). To be fair, in Russia itself the mayonnaise-lovers, while certainly existing, are often made fun of and looked down on by others, so much so that there are even several online communities where ridiculous mayonnaise-featuring recipes are collected and, again, made fun of.
10th Oct '16 12:11:40 PM Megistos86
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* Spanish: Is [[{{Spexico}} the same as Mexican]]. If cursory research has been done, ''paella'', ''chorizo'' or ''gazpacho'' might be mentioned. For some reason ''tapas'' are thought of as classy food for the intellectual hipster as opposed to the bar food that they actually are.

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* Spanish: Is If you are american, is [[{{Spexico}} the same as Mexican]].Mexican]], while in reality there are very broad differences that distinguish the two. If cursory research has been done, ''paella'', ''chorizo'' or ''gazpacho'' might be mentioned. For some reason ''tapas'' are thought of as classy food for the intellectual hipster as opposed to the bar food that they actually are.
1st Oct '16 10:20:29 AM karstovich2
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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo, a cheaper version of [[htpp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal_Orloff Veal Orloff]]) and the Olivier salad.

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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo, a cheaper version of [[htpp://en.[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal_Orloff Veal Orloff]]) and the Olivier salad.
1st Oct '16 10:19:32 AM karstovich2
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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo) and the Olivier salad.

to:

*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo) mayo, a cheaper version of [[htpp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal_Orloff Veal Orloff]]) and the Olivier salad.
1st Oct '16 10:07:32 AM karstovich2
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*** Israeli: [[BerserkButton Do not discuss Israeli cuisine anywhere in the Middle East that isn't Israel]]. They will characterize Israeli cuisine the same way Mark Twain once characterized a manuscript: "[[ObservationOnOriginality both original and good]], but what's originally Israeli is terrible, and what's good is ''stolen''! From ''us''!" For their part, Israelis would accept that a lot of their cuisine is ''borrowed'', but would refute the claim that all of it was borrowed from the Middle East--some of it was borrowed from Central and Eastern Europe. In all seriousness, however, Israel does have quite a few good culinary innovations, and although not all of them are all that great (even an Israeli will give a foreigner a pass for not liking mud coffee[[note]]The so-called "bots", also known as "Polish coffee" in Europe most Ashkenasi Jews repatriated from Poland, y'know, where the coffee is brewed directly in the cup and is never poured off the dregs.[[/note]]), some are quite worthwhile (e.g. ''ptitim''--so-called "Israeli couscous"--and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_mixed_grill Meurav Yerushalmi]]). Furthermore, it is true that "Israeli cuisine" in (e.g.) America means "Middle Eastern, but prepared by Jews". Israelis are also known to take masochistic pride in excessively vinegary and salty foods; that's one way to be sure it's Kosher. Eating it is as solemn a rite as confessional. On the other hand, the Israeli version of "Hollywood Israeli" cuisine is weirdly self-deprecating -- the only things they really point to as being uniquely Israeli are turkey schnitzel, chickpea falafel[[note]]:No fava beans as it might be made elsewhere in the area -- some European Jews are violently allergic to favas.[[/note]], and a particular style of chopped salad that was created by the early kibbutzniks (which is in fact a common pan-European vegetable salad, just chopped to the point of turning into a homogenous mass). Also, harissa (from North Africa) and s'khug (from Yemen), truly terrifying hot sauces rivaled only by southeast Asian sambal and some of the more masochistic products of the US and various Caribbean islands.

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*** Israeli: [[BerserkButton Do not discuss Israeli cuisine anywhere in the Middle East that isn't Israel]]. They will characterize Israeli cuisine the same way Mark Twain once characterized a manuscript: "[[ObservationOnOriginality both original and good]], but what's originally Israeli is terrible, and what's good is ''stolen''! From ''us''!" For their part, Israelis would accept that a lot of their cuisine is ''borrowed'', but would refute the claim that all of it was borrowed from the Middle East--some of it was borrowed from Central and Eastern Europe. In all seriousness, however, Israel does have quite a few good culinary innovations, and although not all of them are all that great (even an Israeli will give a foreigner a pass for not liking mud coffee[[note]]The so-called "bots", also known as "Polish coffee" in Europe most Ashkenasi Jews repatriated from Poland, y'know, where the coffee is brewed directly in the cup and is never poured off the dregs.[[/note]]), some are quite worthwhile (e.g. ''ptitim''--so-called "Israeli couscous"--and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_mixed_grill Meurav Yerushalmi]]). Furthermore, it is true that "Israeli cuisine" in (e.g.) America means "Middle Eastern, but prepared by Jews". Israelis are also known to take masochistic pride in excessively vinegary and salty foods; that's one way to be sure it's Kosher. Eating it is as solemn a rite as confessional. On the other hand, the Israeli version of "Hollywood Israeli" cuisine is weirdly self-deprecating -- the only things they really point to as being uniquely Israeli are turkey schnitzel, chickpea falafel[[note]]:No fava beans as it might be made elsewhere in the area -- some European Jews are violently allergic to favas.[[/note]], and a particular style of chopped salad that was created by the early kibbutzniks (which is in fact a common pan-European pan-European/Mediterranean vegetable salad, salad featuring tomato, cucumber, and red onion with a lemon juice-olive oil dressing, just chopped to the point of turning into a homogenous mass). Also, harissa (from North Africa) and s'khug (from Yemen), truly terrifying hot sauces rivaled only by southeast Asian sambal and some of the more masochistic products of the US and various Caribbean islands.
1st Oct '16 10:00:15 AM karstovich2
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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are there truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli''). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.

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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are there truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli'').''zeytinyağli'', which means "with olive oil"). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.
22nd Sep '16 7:44:21 PM karstovich2
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** What poutine is to Quebec, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab#Canada the donair]]--a variant of Greek gyros or Turkish döner kebap, featuring a sweet-tart sauce based on sweetened condensed milk and vinegar with garlic--is to Atlantic Canada, especially Halifax. It has a following in some other parts of Canada, particularly Alberta (whose oil fields are a magnet for Atlantic Canadians, and especially Newfoundlanders): it got to the point where the Albertan government had to issue regulations on proper donair preparation after an outbreak of ''E. coli'' in 2008 related to bad donair.

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** What poutine is to Quebec, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doner_kebab#Canada the donair]]--a variant of Greek gyros or Turkish döner kebap, featuring which instead of the yogurt-based sauces used elsewhere features a sweet-tart sauce based on sweetened condensed milk and vinegar with garlic--is to Atlantic Canada, especially Halifax. It has a following in some other parts of Canada, particularly Alberta (whose oil fields are a magnet for Atlantic Canadians, and especially Newfoundlanders): it got to the point where the Albertan government had to issue regulations on proper donair preparation after an outbreak of ''E. coli'' in 2008 related to bad donair.
16th Sep '16 8:51:21 PM karstovich2
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** Within China, dishes from Sichuan are stereotyped as being spicy enough to set things on fire yet leaving a pleasant tingly sensation on the lips, while the stuff from Hunan is considered the super-spicy, oily, garlicky peasant food that everyone ''has'' to like because Chairman Mao said so. The Beijing food is so boring as to not have any special dish (except the much mocked Peking duck), the Northerners as the ones who seems to subsist entirely on beef and noodles, while the Southerners are the ones who would eat anything not nailed down. With respect to this last: the oft-quoted joke about the Chinese eating "everything with four legs that is not a table, everything that swims that is not a submarine, and everything that flies and is not an airplane" is actually an adaptation of a joke Northern Chinese told about Southerners and particularly Cantonese (i.e. people from Guangdong Province); in a [[http://foreignpolicy.com/2014/03/04/a-map-of-china-by-stereotype/ map compiling searches Chinese people make about China's provinces]], the most common search for Guangdong was "eats monkeys". And those from Inner Mongolia are the ones who seems to be overly fond of their sheep, and let us not speak about those from Tibet and their yaks...

to:

** Within China, dishes from Sichuan are stereotyped as being spicy enough to set things on fire yet leaving a pleasant tingly sensation on the lips, while the stuff from Hunan is considered the super-spicy, oily, smoky, garlicky peasant food that everyone ''has'' to like because Chairman Mao said so.so. Meanwhile, Guizhou's spicy-vinegary cooking is so hot as to send Sichuanese and Hunanese diners running in terror (though it does go well with [[GargleBlaster the region's strong spirits]]). The Beijing food is so boring as to not have any special dish (except the much mocked Peking duck), the Northerners as the ones who seems to subsist entirely on beef and noodles, while the Southerners are the ones who would eat anything not nailed down. With respect to this last: the oft-quoted joke about the Chinese eating "everything with four legs that is not a table, everything that swims that is not a submarine, and everything that flies and is not an airplane" is actually an adaptation of a joke Northern Chinese told about Southerners and particularly Cantonese (i.e. people from Guangdong Province); in a [[http://foreignpolicy.com/2014/03/04/a-map-of-china-by-stereotype/ map compiling searches Chinese people make about China's provinces]], the most common search for Guangdong was "eats monkeys". And those from Inner Mongolia are the ones who seems to be overly fond of their sheep, and let us not speak about those from Tibet and their yaks...
16th Sep '16 8:29:09 PM karstovich2
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Added DiffLines:

** Although Canadians do eat Canadian bacon, (1) most bacon in Canada is streaky bacon like in the US and (2) they don't call it "Canadian bacon", but rather simply "back bacon." The association of back bacon with Canada may come from a real affinity in Southern Ontario, and particularly the UsefulNotes/{{Toronto}} area, for peameal bacon, a particular kind of back bacon (historically rolled in ground dried peas and today generally rolled in cornmeal) originally developed in 19th-century Toronto.
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