History Main / HollywoodCuisine

11th Apr '17 2:16:57 AM KomasanS
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* Thailand: Thai food had experienced an explosion in popularity during the 1990's, increasing their presence in the media and at the grocery store. By far the most famous and most-depicted dish is Pad Thai, but no one seems to really know what goes in one, so it's most often depicted as this dish with noodles, chopped vegetables, and thinly sliced bits of meat with some thick dark brown sauce over it[[note]]That being said, there really IS tremendous variation in Pad Thai, the only standards being noodles and certain ingredients in the sauce[[/note]]. Thai iced tea is the runner-up, which is even more clueless in its depiction; sometimes, it's accurately shown as an opaque, deep orange-colored drink sometimes with the top part being white, and sometimes, it looks exactly the same as American iced tea. Also, everything has peanuts in it, regardless of how little sense it makes, and oftentimes bell peppers (which is not a normal part of authentic Thai cuisine).

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* Thailand: Thai: Thai food had experienced an explosion in popularity during the 1990's, increasing their presence in the media and at the grocery store. By far the most famous and most-depicted dish is Pad Thai, but no one seems to really know what goes in one, so it's most often depicted as this dish with noodles, chopped vegetables, and thinly sliced bits of meat with some thick dark brown sauce over it[[note]]That being said, there really IS tremendous variation in Pad Thai, the only standards being noodles and certain ingredients in the sauce[[/note]]. Thai iced tea is the runner-up, which is even more clueless in its depiction; sometimes, it's accurately shown as an opaque, deep orange-colored drink sometimes with the top part being white, and sometimes, it looks exactly the same as American iced tea. Also, everything has peanuts in it, regardless of how little sense it makes, and oftentimes bell peppers (which is not a normal part of authentic Thai cuisine).
8th Apr '17 1:42:16 PM nombretomado
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** ''RegularOrdinarySwedishMealTime'' have made a few traditional Swedish dishes, including the aforementioned meatballs, smörgåstårta, and pyttipanna. Potatoes as a side dish appear frequently. Oh yeah, and mayonnaise. [[CatchPhrase It's good for you]].

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** ''RegularOrdinarySwedishMealTime'' ''WebVideo/RegularOrdinarySwedishMealTime'' have made a few traditional Swedish dishes, including the aforementioned meatballs, smörgåstårta, and pyttipanna. Potatoes as a side dish appear frequently. Oh yeah, and mayonnaise. [[CatchPhrase It's good for you]].
11th Mar '17 3:24:25 PM karstovich2
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** Cheeses: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, gorgonzola, and ricotta are probably the most famous varieties and are very likely to be mentioned. Provolone, Grana Padano, and pecorino romano are the next-most likely (the first because it is reasonably widespread outside Italy, the second and third because they are very common cheeses inside Italy that see a substantial export market as people who don't want shell out for the full PDO Parmigiano Reggiano but have enough taste to avoid buying generic "parmesan" will buy these as a substitute). Asiago has also become a fairly common mention since about 2000. Other cheeses like toma piemontese, tomino, scamorza, and the non-romano forms of pecorino are likely to be mentioned only where serious food knowledge is implicated--except when you mention casu marzu, which you talk about only for the shock value (it's a pecorino sardo that has been infested with maggots; eating it with the maggots still present is considered especially manly in its native Sardinia).

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** Cheeses: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, gorgonzola, and ricotta are probably the most famous varieties and are very likely to be mentioned. Provolone, Grana Padano, and pecorino romano are the next-most likely (the first because it is reasonably widespread outside Italy, the second and third because they are very common cheeses inside Italy that see a substantial export market as people who don't want shell out for the full PDO Parmigiano Reggiano but have enough taste to avoid buying generic "parmesan" will buy these as a substitute). Asiago has also become a fairly common mention since about 2000.2000, when non-Italian foodies realized the stuff was almost like cheddar that somehow tasted of Parmigiano or Grana Padano. Other cheeses like toma piemontese, tomino, scamorza, and the non-romano forms of pecorino are likely to be mentioned only where serious food knowledge is implicated--except when you mention casu marzu, which you talk about only for the shock value (it's a pecorino sardo that has been infested with maggots; eating it with the maggots still present is considered especially manly in its native Sardinia).
30th Oct '16 2:21:03 PM IzzyMaleficent
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** Welsh: Lamb, and of course Welsh rarebit (more authentically Welsh rabbit, [[TakeThat which is a joke]] and makes more sense), a thick sauce of cheese, beer and mustard, spread on toast and browned under the grill. Cheese in general (especially Caerphilly, the only Welsh cheese most can name)--the English have been joking about the Welsh fondness for cheese since at least the 16th century. Lesser known are "laver" (a type of seaweed, often used to make "laver bread"--which is kind of [[NonindicativeName nonindicative]], as it consists of laver boiled and minced till it turns to jelly, rolled in oatmeal, and then fried) and cawl (a type of meat and vegetable stew, also used as the modern Welsh word for "soup").

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** Welsh: Lamb, leeks, and of course Welsh rarebit (more authentically Welsh rabbit, [[TakeThat which is a joke]] and makes more sense), a thick sauce of cheese, beer and mustard, spread on toast and browned under the grill. Cheese in general (especially Caerphilly, the only Welsh cheese most can name)--the English have been joking about the Welsh fondness for cheese since at least the 16th century. Lesser known are "laver" (a type of seaweed, often used to make "laver bread"--which is kind of [[NonindicativeName nonindicative]], as it consists of laver boiled and minced till it turns to jelly, rolled in oatmeal, and then fried) and cawl (a type of meat and vegetable stew, also used as the modern Welsh word for "soup").
24th Oct '16 8:18:16 PM karstovich2
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** On the Internet Russians are often portrayed as mayonnaise fiends. To an extent, [[TruthInTelevision many of them are]]: Russia leads the mayonnaise consumption in Europe, and many Russians use mayo with ''everything'', just like the Yanks do with ketchup (which they also like). Some even use it instead of sour cream and/or bechamel[[note]]Helped by the fact that the modern processed mayo ''is'' more of a bechamel than the mayonnaise, with its starch and gum thickeners[[/note]], and if a recipe calls for the oil and egg yolk, they ''will'' try to replace them with mayo to simplify cooking. [[CordonBleughChef Sometimes it even works]]. The aforementioned faux-French casserole is a prime example of that. To be fair, in Russia itself the mayonnaise-lovers, while certainly existing, are often made fun of and looked down on by others, so much so that there are even several online communities where ridiculous mayonnaise-featuring recipes are collected and, again, made fun of.

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** On the Internet Russians are often portrayed as mayonnaise fiends. To an extent, [[TruthInTelevision many of them are]]: Russia leads the mayonnaise consumption in Europe, and many Russians use mayo with ''everything'', just like the Yanks do with ketchup (which they also like). Some even use it instead of sour cream and/or bechamel[[note]]Helped by the fact that the modern processed mayo ''is'' more of a bechamel than the mayonnaise, with its starch and gum thickeners[[/note]], and if a recipe calls for the oil and egg yolk, they ''will'' try to replace them with mayo to simplify cooking. [[CordonBleughChef Sometimes it even works]]. The aforementioned faux-French casserole is a prime example of that.that (the original, which was invented by a French chef in the employ of the Russian ambassador to France, calls for slices of braised veal to be layered with béchamel, topped with cheese, and then baked; "French Meat" uses cheaper cuts and typically substitutes mayo for the béchamel). To be fair, in Russia itself the mayonnaise-lovers, while certainly existing, are often made fun of and looked down on by others, so much so that there are even several online communities where ridiculous mayonnaise-featuring recipes are collected and, again, made fun of.
10th Oct '16 12:11:40 PM Megistos86
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* Spanish: Is [[{{Spexico}} the same as Mexican]]. If cursory research has been done, ''paella'', ''chorizo'' or ''gazpacho'' might be mentioned. For some reason ''tapas'' are thought of as classy food for the intellectual hipster as opposed to the bar food that they actually are.

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* Spanish: Is If you are american, is [[{{Spexico}} the same as Mexican]].Mexican]], while in reality there are very broad differences that distinguish the two. If cursory research has been done, ''paella'', ''chorizo'' or ''gazpacho'' might be mentioned. For some reason ''tapas'' are thought of as classy food for the intellectual hipster as opposed to the bar food that they actually are.
1st Oct '16 10:20:29 AM karstovich2
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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo, a cheaper version of [[htpp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal_Orloff Veal Orloff]]) and the Olivier salad.

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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo, a cheaper version of [[htpp://en.[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal_Orloff Veal Orloff]]) and the Olivier salad.
1st Oct '16 10:19:32 AM karstovich2
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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo) and the Olivier salad.

to:

*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo) mayo, a cheaper version of [[htpp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veal_Orloff Veal Orloff]]) and the Olivier salad.
1st Oct '16 10:07:32 AM karstovich2
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*** Israeli: [[BerserkButton Do not discuss Israeli cuisine anywhere in the Middle East that isn't Israel]]. They will characterize Israeli cuisine the same way Mark Twain once characterized a manuscript: "[[ObservationOnOriginality both original and good]], but what's originally Israeli is terrible, and what's good is ''stolen''! From ''us''!" For their part, Israelis would accept that a lot of their cuisine is ''borrowed'', but would refute the claim that all of it was borrowed from the Middle East--some of it was borrowed from Central and Eastern Europe. In all seriousness, however, Israel does have quite a few good culinary innovations, and although not all of them are all that great (even an Israeli will give a foreigner a pass for not liking mud coffee[[note]]The so-called "bots", also known as "Polish coffee" in Europe most Ashkenasi Jews repatriated from Poland, y'know, where the coffee is brewed directly in the cup and is never poured off the dregs.[[/note]]), some are quite worthwhile (e.g. ''ptitim''--so-called "Israeli couscous"--and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_mixed_grill Meurav Yerushalmi]]). Furthermore, it is true that "Israeli cuisine" in (e.g.) America means "Middle Eastern, but prepared by Jews". Israelis are also known to take masochistic pride in excessively vinegary and salty foods; that's one way to be sure it's Kosher. Eating it is as solemn a rite as confessional. On the other hand, the Israeli version of "Hollywood Israeli" cuisine is weirdly self-deprecating -- the only things they really point to as being uniquely Israeli are turkey schnitzel, chickpea falafel[[note]]:No fava beans as it might be made elsewhere in the area -- some European Jews are violently allergic to favas.[[/note]], and a particular style of chopped salad that was created by the early kibbutzniks (which is in fact a common pan-European vegetable salad, just chopped to the point of turning into a homogenous mass). Also, harissa (from North Africa) and s'khug (from Yemen), truly terrifying hot sauces rivaled only by southeast Asian sambal and some of the more masochistic products of the US and various Caribbean islands.

to:

*** Israeli: [[BerserkButton Do not discuss Israeli cuisine anywhere in the Middle East that isn't Israel]]. They will characterize Israeli cuisine the same way Mark Twain once characterized a manuscript: "[[ObservationOnOriginality both original and good]], but what's originally Israeli is terrible, and what's good is ''stolen''! From ''us''!" For their part, Israelis would accept that a lot of their cuisine is ''borrowed'', but would refute the claim that all of it was borrowed from the Middle East--some of it was borrowed from Central and Eastern Europe. In all seriousness, however, Israel does have quite a few good culinary innovations, and although not all of them are all that great (even an Israeli will give a foreigner a pass for not liking mud coffee[[note]]The so-called "bots", also known as "Polish coffee" in Europe most Ashkenasi Jews repatriated from Poland, y'know, where the coffee is brewed directly in the cup and is never poured off the dregs.[[/note]]), some are quite worthwhile (e.g. ''ptitim''--so-called "Israeli couscous"--and [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jerusalem_mixed_grill Meurav Yerushalmi]]). Furthermore, it is true that "Israeli cuisine" in (e.g.) America means "Middle Eastern, but prepared by Jews". Israelis are also known to take masochistic pride in excessively vinegary and salty foods; that's one way to be sure it's Kosher. Eating it is as solemn a rite as confessional. On the other hand, the Israeli version of "Hollywood Israeli" cuisine is weirdly self-deprecating -- the only things they really point to as being uniquely Israeli are turkey schnitzel, chickpea falafel[[note]]:No fava beans as it might be made elsewhere in the area -- some European Jews are violently allergic to favas.[[/note]], and a particular style of chopped salad that was created by the early kibbutzniks (which is in fact a common pan-European pan-European/Mediterranean vegetable salad, salad featuring tomato, cucumber, and red onion with a lemon juice-olive oil dressing, just chopped to the point of turning into a homogenous mass). Also, harissa (from North Africa) and s'khug (from Yemen), truly terrifying hot sauces rivaled only by southeast Asian sambal and some of the more masochistic products of the US and various Caribbean islands.
1st Oct '16 10:00:15 AM karstovich2
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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are there truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli''). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.

to:

*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are there truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli'').''zeytinyağli'', which means "with olive oil"). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.
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