History Main / HollywoodCuisine

1st Aug '16 8:38:39 PM xenol
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*** Funnily enough, sushi rolls (or makizushi) doesn't have a widespread variety in Japan as it does in the United States. The seaweed is also usually the outer layer, not the rice.


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** Want to make it Japanese? Add teriyaki sauce to it!
25th Jul '16 2:30:23 PM ZombieAladdin
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* Thailand: Thai food had experienced an explosion in popularity during the 1990's, increasing their presence in the media and at the grocery store. By far the most famous and most-depicted dish is Pad Thai, but no one seems to really know what goes in one, so it's most often depicted as this dish with noodles, chopped vegetables, and thinly sliced bits of meat with some thick dark brown sauce over it[[note]]That being said, there really IS tremendous variation in Pad Thai, the only standards being noodles and certain ingredients in the sauce[[/note]]. Thai iced tea is the runner-up, which is even more clueless in its depiction; sometimes, it's accurately shown as an opaque, deep orange-colored drink sometimes with the top part being white, and sometimes, it looks exactly the same as American iced tea. Also, everything has peanuts in it, regardless of how little sense it makes, and oftentimes bell peppers (which is not a normal part of authentic Thai cuisine).
19th Jun '16 1:10:15 PM aurora369
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** Just like with Germans, everything is coarse, greasy and fattening ([[RussianGuySuffersMost when available]]).

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** Just like with Germans, everything is coarse, greasy and fattening ([[RussianGuySuffersMost when available]]).available]]), and has a lot of pungent vegetables such as garlic, horseradish and mustard ([[BlazingInfernoHellfireSauce the hottest mustard in Europe]]).
19th Jun '16 1:05:51 PM aurora369
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*** As a counterpoint, there are two dishes which are Russian in origin and have nothing to do with France, but are called French: "French Meat" (a meat casserole with mayo) and the Olivier salad.



** On the Internet Russians are often portrayed as mayonnaise fiends. To an extent, [[TruthInTelevision many of them are]]: Russia leads the mayonnaise consumption in Europe, and many Russians use mayo with ''everything'', just like the Yanks do with ketchup (which they also like). Some even use it instead of sour cream and/or bechamel[[note]]Helped by the fact that the modern processed mayo ''is'' more of a bechamel than the mayonnaise, with its starch and gum thickeners[[/note]], and if a recipe calls for the oil and egg yolk, they ''will'' try to replace them with mayo to simplify cooking. [[CordonBleughChef Sometimes it even works]]. To be fair, in Russia itself the mayonnaise-lovers, while certainly existing, are often made fun of and looked down on by others, so much so that there are even several online communities where ridiculous mayonnaise-featuring recipes are collected and, again, made fun of.

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** On the Internet Russians are often portrayed as mayonnaise fiends. To an extent, [[TruthInTelevision many of them are]]: Russia leads the mayonnaise consumption in Europe, and many Russians use mayo with ''everything'', just like the Yanks do with ketchup (which they also like). Some even use it instead of sour cream and/or bechamel[[note]]Helped by the fact that the modern processed mayo ''is'' more of a bechamel than the mayonnaise, with its starch and gum thickeners[[/note]], and if a recipe calls for the oil and egg yolk, they ''will'' try to replace them with mayo to simplify cooking. [[CordonBleughChef Sometimes it even works]]. The aforementioned faux-French casserole is a prime example of that. To be fair, in Russia itself the mayonnaise-lovers, while certainly existing, are often made fun of and looked down on by others, so much so that there are even several online communities where ridiculous mayonnaise-featuring recipes are collected and, again, made fun of.
15th Jun '16 7:39:55 PM karstovich2
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*** Specific to Montreal, smoked meat and bagels, which are different from the smoked meat and bagels of New York. Just as the New Yorker will argue with the Chicagoan as to whose pizza is better, he will argue with the Montrealer over bagels and smoked meat.

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*** ** Specific to Montreal, UsefulNotes/{{Montreal}}, smoked meat and bagels, which are different from the smoked meat pastrami[[note]]Which is prepared by a virtually identical process, but with different flavoring[[/note]] and bagels of New York. Just as the New Yorker will argue with the Chicagoan as to whose pizza is better, he will argue with the Montrealer over bagels and smoked meat.meat/pastrami.
9th Jun '16 10:36:45 AM Rubber_Lotus
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* German: [[GermanPeculiarities Beer]], sausages, [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment beer]], sauerkraut, [[RuleOfThree beer]], black bread, and [[RunningGag beer]]. Sauerkraut is actually more popular in Russia and Poland, but is strongly associated with Germany (to the point that "kraut" became an ethnic slur), where again it is mostly served only in parts of the south. Everything will be extremely heavy and fattening, and so will the people eating it. Sausages and black whole-grain bread--especially rye--are also stereotypical, with "sausage-eater" being a secondary slur for Germans;[[note]]In fact, Poles and Russians, who eat even more sauerkraut than the Germans, never used it in their victual mud-slinging, and prefer to call the Germand "sausage-eaters".[[/note]] Germans don't care, and [[UsefulNotes/GermanPeculiarities proudly inform you that Germany has over 1500 kinds of sausage and 300 kinds of bread, so you could have a different combination daily for ten years and not repeat once]]. Expect massive steins being served by buxom maidens in dirndls to men in lederhosen. Also [[OverlyLongGag beer]] and Schnapps. Pretzels (when those aren't associated with Pennsylvania...but then, Pennsylvania got them from the Germans, so it all comes together in the end). [[BrickJoke Beer]]!

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* German: [[GermanPeculiarities Beer]], sausages, [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment beer]], sauerkraut, [[RuleOfThree beer]], black bread, and [[RunningGag beer]]. Sauerkraut is actually more popular in Russia and Poland, but is strongly associated with Germany (to the point that "kraut" became an ethnic slur), where again it is mostly served only in parts of the south. Everything will be extremely heavy and fattening, and so will the people eating it. Sausages and black whole-grain bread--especially rye--are also stereotypical, with "sausage-eater" being a secondary slur for Germans;[[note]]In fact, Poles and Russians, who eat even more sauerkraut than the Germans, never used it in their victual mud-slinging, and prefer to call the Germand Germans "sausage-eaters".[[/note]] Germans don't care, and [[UsefulNotes/GermanPeculiarities proudly inform you that Germany has over 1500 kinds of sausage and 300 kinds of bread, so you could have a different combination daily for ten years and not repeat once]]. Expect massive steins being served by buxom maidens in dirndls to men in lederhosen. Also [[OverlyLongGag beer]] and Schnapps. Pretzels (when those aren't associated with Pennsylvania...but then, Pennsylvania got them from the Germans, so it all comes together in the end). [[BrickJoke Beer]]!
6th Jun '16 7:50:12 PM karstovich2
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* Belgium. Beer (often from a small brewery), "French" fries[[note]]originally "French-fried" potatoes, meaning "deep-fried"[[/note]] and chocolates. Waffles, which are common in Belgium and come in a bewildering array of styles and flavors.[[note]]However, what Americans and Canadians call "Belgian waffles" are an amalgamation of the Brussels and Liège styles common in Belgium.[[/note]] More knowledgeable folks will remember to dip the fries in a mayonnaise-based sauce and include a big bucket of mussels. These knowledgeable people will also know about Belgium's numerous other dishes (e.g. waterzooi, a kind of chicken or fish stew with cream and leeks, and carbonade flamande, a beef stew that's rather like a boeuf bourguignon but with beer instead of wine), and will have this general verdict on Belgian food: All the quality of French food without the pretense; all the homeyness of British and Dutch food without the blandness.

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* Belgium. Beer (often from a small brewery), "French" fries[[note]]originally "French-fried" potatoes, meaning "deep-fried"[[/note]] and chocolates. Waffles, which are common in Belgium and come in a bewildering array of styles and flavors.[[note]]However, what Americans and Canadians call "Belgian waffles" are an amalgamation of the Brussels and Liège styles common in Belgium.[[/note]] More knowledgeable folks will remember to dip the fries in a mayonnaise-based sauce and include a big bucket of mussels. These knowledgeable people will also know about Belgium's numerous other dishes (e.g. waterzooi, a kind of chicken or fish stew with cream and leeks, and carbonade flamande, a beef stew that's rather like a boeuf bourguignon but with beer instead of wine), and will have this general verdict on Belgian food: All the quality of (good regional) French food without the pretense; all the homeyness of British and Dutch food without the blandness.
6th Jun '16 7:42:13 PM karstovich2
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** [[OnlyInFlorida Florida]]: Oranges oranges oranges. Citrus. Gator tail, catfish, and who knows what else in the swampy backwoods. Northern and Central Florida is a mix between Big-Easy and Deep South, Southern Florida and Tampa Bay has more Latin and Caribbean Cuisine. Emphasis on seafood all around. Also Key Lime pie, and fruity mixed drinks like margaritas and daiquiris.

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** [[OnlyInFlorida Florida]]: Oranges oranges oranges. Citrus. Gator tail, catfish, and who knows what else in the swampy backwoods. Northern and Central Florida is a mix between Big-Easy and Deep South, Southern Florida and Tampa Bay has more Latin and Caribbean Cuisine.Cuisine--you can get a good Cuban sandwich both in Miami and in Tampa, but Heaven help you if you ask for salami on your Cuban in Miami (or don't want salami on your Cuban in Tampa). Emphasis on seafood all around. Also Key Lime pie, and fruity mixed drinks like margaritas and daiquiris.
6th Jun '16 7:38:22 PM karstovich2
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** General: Hamburgers, hot dogs, and fast food all around. Also turkey, through association with Thanksgiving.

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** General: Hamburgers, hot dogs, and fast food all around. Steaks--big steaks (extra-big in Texas), possibly with a side of steak fries (extra-thick French fries/what the British think of as "chips") or a baked potato. Also turkey, through association with Thanksgiving.
6th Jun '16 7:35:56 PM karstovich2
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** Cheeses: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, gorgonzola, and ricotta are probably the most famous varieties and are very likely to be mentioned. Provolone, Grana Padano, and pecorino romano are the next-most likely (the first because it is reasonably widespread outside Italy, the second and third because they are very common cheeses inside Italy that see a substantial export market as people who don't want shell out for the full PDO Parmigiano Reggiano but have enough taste to avoid buying generic "parmesan"). Asiago has also become a fairly common mention since about 2000. Other cheeses like toma piemontese, tomino, scamorza, and the non-romano forms of pecorino are likely to be mentioned only where serious food knowledge is implicated--except when you mention casu marzu, which you talk about only for the shock value (it's a pecorino sardo that has been infested with maggots; eating it with the maggots still present is considered especially manly in its native Sardinia).

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** Cheeses: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, gorgonzola, and ricotta are probably the most famous varieties and are very likely to be mentioned. Provolone, Grana Padano, and pecorino romano are the next-most likely (the first because it is reasonably widespread outside Italy, the second and third because they are very common cheeses inside Italy that see a substantial export market as people who don't want shell out for the full PDO Parmigiano Reggiano but have enough taste to avoid buying generic "parmesan")."parmesan" will buy these as a substitute). Asiago has also become a fairly common mention since about 2000. Other cheeses like toma piemontese, tomino, scamorza, and the non-romano forms of pecorino are likely to be mentioned only where serious food knowledge is implicated--except when you mention casu marzu, which you talk about only for the shock value (it's a pecorino sardo that has been infested with maggots; eating it with the maggots still present is considered especially manly in its native Sardinia).
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