History Main / HollywoodCuisine

30th May '17 6:01:53 PM GlassCatOwl
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** Actual Australian cuisine is heavily influenced by Italian and Greek food (to the point where an Australian asked by Italian friends to prepare an Australian dish will sheepishly admit that it's mostly pasta) but good luck finding a mention of this in fiction. The preoccupation with tomato sauce is TruthInTelevision though.

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** Actual Australian cuisine is heavily influenced by Italian and Greek food (to the point where an Australian asked by Italian friends to prepare an Australian dish will sheepishly admit that it's mostly pasta) but good luck finding a mention of this in fiction. The preoccupation with tomato sauce on sausage rolls and meat pies is TruthInTelevision though.
30th May '17 6:00:17 PM GlassCatOwl
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Added DiffLines:

** Actual Australian cuisine is heavily influenced by Italian and Greek food (to the point where an Australian asked by Italian friends to prepare an Australian dish will sheepishly admit that it's mostly pasta) but good luck finding a mention of this in fiction. The preoccupation with tomato sauce is TruthInTelevision though.
16th May '17 4:34:10 PM nombretomado
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** [[TheOtherRainforest Pacific Northwest]] - Asian fusion, massive amounts of fish, and gallons of [[TwinPeaks damn good]] coffee. (This applies to the [[StargateCity Canadian portion]] of the region as well.) Washington State is famous for its apples (more than half the apples consumed in the United States grow in Washington) and in recent years has developed a positive reputation for its wines.

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** [[TheOtherRainforest Pacific Northwest]] - Asian fusion, massive amounts of fish, and gallons of [[TwinPeaks [[Series/TwinPeaks damn good]] coffee. (This applies to the [[StargateCity Canadian portion]] of the region as well.) Washington State is famous for its apples (more than half the apples consumed in the United States grow in Washington) and in recent years has developed a positive reputation for its wines.
25th Apr '17 6:09:23 PM karstovich2
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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are there truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli'', which means "with olive oil"). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.

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*** Turkish: Most culinary experts would say the Turkish kitchen is even better than the Lebanese--including a good number of Lebanese experts, who often turn to Turkey for inspiration. At least one expert has stated that there are there three truly grand culinary traditions in the world: the Chinese, the French, and the Turkish. Stereotypically consists of döner kebab and lots of stuff with phyllo dough. Plenty of yogurt, too, as well as stranger dairy items. Lots of dishes featuring stewed or roasted vegetables, which may be made with meat or without it; in the latter case, the dish will feature lots of olive oil (actually true--these dishes are called ''zeytinyağli'', which means "with olive oil"). The vegetables are often stuffed. Also, Turkish coffee. Expect pita bread as well.
24th Apr '17 6:28:08 PM karstovich2
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*** Finland: Good bread and random things from the wild. Sautéed reindeer may be mentioned. Other Nordics may also make fun of the Finns for [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammi mämmi]], which really does look like poop, even though it's basically the same thing as Danish rødgrød (med fløde!) made with rye flour[[note]]Rødgrød ''can'' in rare cases be made with rye, although semolina and other grains are traditional and potato starch is the most common modern option[[/note]] and no berries.

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*** Finland: Good bread and random things from the wild. Sautéed reindeer may be mentioned. Other Nordics may also make fun of the Finns for [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammi mämmi]], which really does look like poop, even though it's basically the same thing as very similar to Danish rødgrød (med fløde!) made with rye flour[[note]]Rødgrød ''can'' in rare cases be made with rye, although semolina and other grains are traditional and potato starch is the most common modern option[[/note]] and no berries.
24th Apr '17 6:24:21 PM karstovich2
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*** Finland: Good bread and random things from the wild.

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*** Finland: Good bread and random things from the wild. Sautéed reindeer may be mentioned. Other Nordics may also make fun of the Finns for [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mammi mämmi]], which really does look like poop, even though it's basically the same thing as Danish rødgrød (med fløde!) made with rye flour[[note]]Rødgrød ''can'' in rare cases be made with rye, although semolina and other grains are traditional and potato starch is the most common modern option[[/note]] and no berries.
11th Apr '17 2:16:57 AM KomasanS
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* Thailand: Thai food had experienced an explosion in popularity during the 1990's, increasing their presence in the media and at the grocery store. By far the most famous and most-depicted dish is Pad Thai, but no one seems to really know what goes in one, so it's most often depicted as this dish with noodles, chopped vegetables, and thinly sliced bits of meat with some thick dark brown sauce over it[[note]]That being said, there really IS tremendous variation in Pad Thai, the only standards being noodles and certain ingredients in the sauce[[/note]]. Thai iced tea is the runner-up, which is even more clueless in its depiction; sometimes, it's accurately shown as an opaque, deep orange-colored drink sometimes with the top part being white, and sometimes, it looks exactly the same as American iced tea. Also, everything has peanuts in it, regardless of how little sense it makes, and oftentimes bell peppers (which is not a normal part of authentic Thai cuisine).

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* Thailand: Thai: Thai food had experienced an explosion in popularity during the 1990's, increasing their presence in the media and at the grocery store. By far the most famous and most-depicted dish is Pad Thai, but no one seems to really know what goes in one, so it's most often depicted as this dish with noodles, chopped vegetables, and thinly sliced bits of meat with some thick dark brown sauce over it[[note]]That being said, there really IS tremendous variation in Pad Thai, the only standards being noodles and certain ingredients in the sauce[[/note]]. Thai iced tea is the runner-up, which is even more clueless in its depiction; sometimes, it's accurately shown as an opaque, deep orange-colored drink sometimes with the top part being white, and sometimes, it looks exactly the same as American iced tea. Also, everything has peanuts in it, regardless of how little sense it makes, and oftentimes bell peppers (which is not a normal part of authentic Thai cuisine).
8th Apr '17 1:42:16 PM nombretomado
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** ''RegularOrdinarySwedishMealTime'' have made a few traditional Swedish dishes, including the aforementioned meatballs, smörgåstårta, and pyttipanna. Potatoes as a side dish appear frequently. Oh yeah, and mayonnaise. [[CatchPhrase It's good for you]].

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** ''RegularOrdinarySwedishMealTime'' ''WebVideo/RegularOrdinarySwedishMealTime'' have made a few traditional Swedish dishes, including the aforementioned meatballs, smörgåstårta, and pyttipanna. Potatoes as a side dish appear frequently. Oh yeah, and mayonnaise. [[CatchPhrase It's good for you]].
11th Mar '17 3:24:25 PM karstovich2
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** Cheeses: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, gorgonzola, and ricotta are probably the most famous varieties and are very likely to be mentioned. Provolone, Grana Padano, and pecorino romano are the next-most likely (the first because it is reasonably widespread outside Italy, the second and third because they are very common cheeses inside Italy that see a substantial export market as people who don't want shell out for the full PDO Parmigiano Reggiano but have enough taste to avoid buying generic "parmesan" will buy these as a substitute). Asiago has also become a fairly common mention since about 2000. Other cheeses like toma piemontese, tomino, scamorza, and the non-romano forms of pecorino are likely to be mentioned only where serious food knowledge is implicated--except when you mention casu marzu, which you talk about only for the shock value (it's a pecorino sardo that has been infested with maggots; eating it with the maggots still present is considered especially manly in its native Sardinia).

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** Cheeses: Mozzarella, Parmigiano Reggiano, gorgonzola, and ricotta are probably the most famous varieties and are very likely to be mentioned. Provolone, Grana Padano, and pecorino romano are the next-most likely (the first because it is reasonably widespread outside Italy, the second and third because they are very common cheeses inside Italy that see a substantial export market as people who don't want shell out for the full PDO Parmigiano Reggiano but have enough taste to avoid buying generic "parmesan" will buy these as a substitute). Asiago has also become a fairly common mention since about 2000.2000, when non-Italian foodies realized the stuff was almost like cheddar that somehow tasted of Parmigiano or Grana Padano. Other cheeses like toma piemontese, tomino, scamorza, and the non-romano forms of pecorino are likely to be mentioned only where serious food knowledge is implicated--except when you mention casu marzu, which you talk about only for the shock value (it's a pecorino sardo that has been infested with maggots; eating it with the maggots still present is considered especially manly in its native Sardinia).
30th Oct '16 2:21:03 PM IzzyMaleficent
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** Welsh: Lamb, and of course Welsh rarebit (more authentically Welsh rabbit, [[TakeThat which is a joke]] and makes more sense), a thick sauce of cheese, beer and mustard, spread on toast and browned under the grill. Cheese in general (especially Caerphilly, the only Welsh cheese most can name)--the English have been joking about the Welsh fondness for cheese since at least the 16th century. Lesser known are "laver" (a type of seaweed, often used to make "laver bread"--which is kind of [[NonindicativeName nonindicative]], as it consists of laver boiled and minced till it turns to jelly, rolled in oatmeal, and then fried) and cawl (a type of meat and vegetable stew, also used as the modern Welsh word for "soup").

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** Welsh: Lamb, leeks, and of course Welsh rarebit (more authentically Welsh rabbit, [[TakeThat which is a joke]] and makes more sense), a thick sauce of cheese, beer and mustard, spread on toast and browned under the grill. Cheese in general (especially Caerphilly, the only Welsh cheese most can name)--the English have been joking about the Welsh fondness for cheese since at least the 16th century. Lesser known are "laver" (a type of seaweed, often used to make "laver bread"--which is kind of [[NonindicativeName nonindicative]], as it consists of laver boiled and minced till it turns to jelly, rolled in oatmeal, and then fried) and cawl (a type of meat and vegetable stew, also used as the modern Welsh word for "soup").
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