History Main / Hitscan

26th Sep '16 7:13:39 AM erforce
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* ''ResidentEvil'' uses this trope for most guns, at least prior to ''ResidentEvil4''. Because you don't really aim in those games, the guns appear to use a rather generous cone of damage in which firing will damage zombies - as long as you're facing the right direction, you'll usually hit. Presumably your character handles the fine aim control him or herself. This is what makes modes like Invisible Enemy feasible (along with the fact that you rarely NEED to kill enemies, though it is helpful).

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* ''ResidentEvil'' ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' uses this trope for most guns, at least prior to ''ResidentEvil4''.''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4''. Because you don't really aim in those games, the guns appear to use a rather generous cone of damage in which firing will damage zombies - as long as you're facing the right direction, you'll usually hit. Presumably your character handles the fine aim control him or herself. This is what makes modes like Invisible Enemy feasible (along with the fact that you rarely NEED to kill enemies, though it is helpful).
30th Aug '16 1:21:17 PM MrSeyker
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* ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}'' modeled projectile flight from all bullets, and weapon mods exist to make them fly straighter. It's also particularly helpful that EveryBulletIsATracer if you're sniping, as the bullets visibly drop over distance. It did, however, have an ''extremely'' strange quirk; the hit randomization rules for NPC targeting were also applied to the player.

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* ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}'' modeled projectile flight from all bullets, and weapon mods exist to make them fly straighter. It's also particularly helpful that EveryBulletIsATracer if you're sniping, as the bullets visibly drop over distance. It did, however, have an ''extremely'' strange quirk; the hit randomization rules for NPC targeting were also applied to the player.
30th Aug '16 1:19:49 PM MrSeyker
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* ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}'' modeled projectile flight from all bullets, and weapon mods exist to make them fly straighter. It's also particularly helpful that EveryBulletIsATracer if you're sniping, as the bullets visibly drop over distance. It did, however, have an ''extremely'' strange quirk; the hit randomization rules for NPC targeting were also applied to the player. This meant that ''after'' you hit someone the game would basically roll a dice to check if you hit them, until ''Call of Pripyat'' removed this element.

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* ''VideoGame/{{STALKER}}'' modeled projectile flight from all bullets, and weapon mods exist to make them fly straighter. It's also particularly helpful that EveryBulletIsATracer if you're sniping, as the bullets visibly drop over distance. It did, however, have an ''extremely'' strange quirk; the hit randomization rules for NPC targeting were also applied to the player. This meant that ''after'' you hit someone the game would basically roll a dice to check if you hit them, until ''Call of Pripyat'' removed this element.
28th Aug '16 10:56:01 AM Morgenthaler
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* Most flight combat games (''AceCombat'', ''{{HAWX}}'', etc.) require you to lead your shots when using the airplane's main cannons.

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* Most flight combat games (''AceCombat'', ''{{HAWX}}'', (''VideoGame/AceCombat'', ''VideoGame/{{HAWX}}'', etc.) require you to lead your shots when using the airplane's main cannons.



* ''StarWarsBattlefront'' averts this by necessity, as the nature of blaster bolts (glowing brightly and moving rather more slowly than most bullets) would make HitScan weapons very, very obvious.

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* ''StarWarsBattlefront'' ''VideoGame/StarWarsBattlefront'' averts this by necessity, as the nature of blaster bolts (glowing brightly and moving rather more slowly than most bullets) would make HitScan weapons very, very obvious.
6th Aug '16 1:45:56 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* In ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', most human weapons fire bullets and are hitscan. Covenant weapons, on the other hand, are almost all projectile weapons. Though it seems that the hitscan takes speed into account - this can be most easily seen with the shotgun. Firing it at the end of a wall causes the impact sparks on the near wall to appear noticeably before the far wall. In addition, the bullets (of, say, the pistol) are affected by the movements of the user. Bungie also made Marathon, which used projectile properties for all the weapons.

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* In ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'', most human weapons fire bullets and are hitscan. Covenant weapons, on On the other hand, most Covenant and Promethean guns are almost all projectile weapons. Though it seems that the hitscan takes does take speed into account - this can be most easily seen with the shotgun. Firing shotgun, as firing it at the end of a wall causes the impact sparks on the near wall to appear noticeably before the far wall. In addition, the bullets (of, say, the pistol) are affected by the movements of the user. Bungie also made Marathon, which used projectile properties for all the weapons.user.
27th May '16 1:49:08 AM Zeke
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* In ''Videogame/MegaManBattleNetwork'', [=MegaMan.EXE=]'s arm cannon works by hitscan, as do many common chips like Cannon and Spreader. Same goes for the sequel series ''Videogame/MegaManStarForce''. (This contrasts sharply with the rest of the Mega Man franchise -- see below.)




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* The ''Videogame/MegaMan'' franchise has an abiding love of visible projectiles. There are hundreds of obtainable weapons in the franchise, but hardly any are hitscan-based (except, as noted above, in the ''Battle Network'' and ''Star Force'' series).
23rd May '16 2:48:30 PM Brick3621
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In some early videogames, the game engine did not have enough computational power to actually keep track of all moving projectiles (like the bullets fired from the player's gun), let alone incorporate realistic physical factors like atmospheric friction or gravity.

In some games, this was mediated by placing a limit of OneBulletAtATime. In others, developers chose a Hitscan weapon.

Hitscan weapons do not actually fire anything; instead, when the player pulls the trigger, the weapon traces a trajectory in front of the player and instantly hits whatever the line intersects with first. This differs from a ''projectile'' weapon, whose bullets are independent data objects with a known position and speed (be it fast or [[PainfullySlowProjectile slow]]) that the game actively tracks and checks against potential collisions. A hitscan can be useful in situations where the projectile is moving so fast that it would be difficult to track, such as with realistic lasers and bullets across short distances.

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In some many early videogames, video games, the game engine did not have enough computational power to actually keep track of all moving projectiles (like the bullets fired from the player's gun), let alone incorporate realistic physical factors like atmospheric friction aerodynamics or gravity.

gravity. In some games, this was mediated by placing implementing a limit of OneBulletAtATime. In others, developers chose a implemented Hitscan weapon.

weapons.

Hitscan weapons do not actually fire anything; instead, when the player pulls the trigger, the weapon traces a trajectory in front of the player and instantly hits affects whatever the line intersects with first. This differs from a ''projectile'' weapon, whose bullets are independent data objects with a known position and speed (be it fast or [[PainfullySlowProjectile slow]]) that the game actively tracks and checks against potential collisions. A hitscan Hitscan can be useful in situations where the projectile is either particularly difficult to track or is moving so fast that it would be difficult to track, such as with realistic lasers and bullets across over a short distances.
enough distance that an instantaneous straight line is a practically exact approximation of the projectile's actual path.
5th May '16 1:44:07 PM slvstrChung
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* In the ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series, weapon tech has reached the point to where bullets are actually small pieces from a block of metal ("ammunition block") that are first significantly reduced in mass by a new element ("element zero"), and then propelled electromagnetically to such ludicrous speeds that the hitscan is pretty well justified.

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* In the The ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series, weapon tech has reached series is a SpaceOpera. Whilst human guns still fire physical projectiles, the point to where bullets are actually small pieces from a block tiny shavings of metal ("ammunition block") that are first significantly reduced in mass by a new element ("element zero"), the local {{Phlebotinum}}, "element zero", and then propelled electromagnetically to such ludicrous speeds that the hitscan is pretty well justified.
29th Mar '16 7:58:18 PM TARINunit9
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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' featured hitscan detection for all bullet weapons and the secondary tracer rays of the BFG[[note]]The BFG is a special case; its visible plasma ball is a relatively low-damage projectile. However, when the plasma ball hits something, the weapon then immediately releases invisible hitscan "tracer rays" in the '''originally-fired direction''' from the player's current physical position (if you fire facing north, then move and face west, the tracers will still head north from where you currently are when the plasma hits something). There are 20 of these tracers spread equally in an arc centered on the originally-fired direction, and these tracers are responsible for most of the weapon's actual damage output. By luck or cunning, this mash of undocumented illogical functions encourages daring play far more effectively than sensible mechanics would have[[/note]].

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* ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' featured hitscan detection for all bullet weapons and the secondary tracer rays of the BFG[[note]]The BFG is a special case; its visible plasma ball is a relatively low-damage projectile.normal projectile and deals plenty of damage. However, when the plasma ball hits something, the weapon then immediately releases invisible hitscan "tracer rays" in the '''originally-fired direction''' from the player's current physical position (if you fire facing north, then move and face west, the tracers will still head north from where you currently are when the plasma hits something). There are 20 of these tracers spread equally in an arc centered on the originally-fired direction, and these tracers are responsible for most of the weapon's actual damage output.output (totaled up it almost always exceeds three ''thousand''; it named the {{BFG}} trope for a reason). By luck or cunning, this mash of undocumented illogical functions encourages daring play far more effectively than sensible mechanics would have[[/note]].
9th Oct '15 4:36:32 PM nombretomado
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* ''[[VideoGame/GoldenEye1997 GoldenEye]]'' and ''PerfectDark'' both have fake tracers. In ''PerfectDark'' even ''crossbow bolts'' are hitscan.

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* ''[[VideoGame/GoldenEye1997 GoldenEye]]'' and ''PerfectDark'' ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' both have fake tracers. In ''PerfectDark'' ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'' even ''crossbow bolts'' are hitscan.
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