History Main / Hitpoints

13th Jan '17 1:25:41 PM CurledUpWithDakka
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** The game does a good job at combining the "hit points aren't health" concept with the idea that even in-universe you're an extraplanar creature using a nigh-immortal avatar (NPC communities depend on doctors and herbalists for healing rather than priests and healing magic). HP recovery is very plentiful (and healing potions, while ''mildly toxic'', have no cooldown or usage limits), but recovering from actual injury tends to require more preparation, rather more so if you can't combine it with extensive rest. And no amount of damage can actually drop you until you fail a willpower check - though it still accumulates past the 0-HP stage. The game's designsed so that a player who's enough of a {{Determinator}} can push through threats way out of their character's weight class at the expense of increasingly ugly long-term costs.

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** The game does a good job at combining the "hit points aren't health" concept with the idea that even in-universe you're an extraplanar creature using a nigh-immortal avatar (NPC communities depend on doctors and herbalists for healing rather than priests and healing magic). HP recovery is very plentiful (and healing potions, while ''mildly toxic'', have no cooldown or usage limits), but recovering from actual injury tends to require more preparation, rather more so if you can't combine it with extensive rest. And no amount of damage can actually drop you until you fail a willpower check - though it still accumulates past the 0-HP stage. The game's designsed designed so that a player who's enough of a {{Determinator}} can push through threats way out of their character's weight class at the expense of increasingly ugly long-term costs.



* The Wounds quality in ''VideoGame/FallenLondon'' acts as sort of a reverse hit points meter; when it gets up to 8, your character dies...but [[DeathIsCheap death is notably not permanent]] in the Neath, so [[DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist dying isn't really any more inconvenient]] than raising any of the other Menace stats to 8. (In fact, dying actually has far fewer negative consequences than going insane.)

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* The Wounds quality in ''VideoGame/FallenLondon'' acts as sort of a reverse hit points meter; when it gets up to 8, your character dies... but [[DeathIsCheap death is notably not permanent]] in the Neath, so [[DeathIsASlapOnTheWrist dying isn't really any more inconvenient]] than raising any of the other Menace stats to 8. (In fact, dying actually has far fewer negative consequences than going insane.)
19th Oct '16 11:03:03 PM Galacton
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One of the most common tropes in the world of games is the use of HitPoints.

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch}}es, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)

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One of the most common tropes in the world of Most video games is the use of HitPoints.

are centered around combat. HitPoints measure how close to [[GameOver death]], or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch}}es, etc.), injuries, players get a number or LifeMeter attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are.their current status. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many Some games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)
combat.



In {{Role Playing Game}}s with levels, you usually get a higher maximum number of Hit Points with each CharacterLevel.

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In many {{Role Playing Game}}s with levels, Game}}s, you usually get a higher maximum number of Hit Points with each CharacterLevel.



They're often displayed in a LifeMeter. Try not to let them decrease too much or pretty soon, your eyes and/or ears will become [[SarcasmMode graced]] by the presence of CriticalAnnoyance.

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They're often displayed in a LifeMeter. Try not to let them decrease too much or pretty soon, your eyes and/or ears will become [[SarcasmMode graced]] by the presence of CriticalAnnoyance.
LifeMeter.



* An extremely creative version in ''VideoGame/{{EarthBound}}''. Instead of getting instantly decreased, the HP "odometer" runs down to the new value gradually. This also allows fatally wounded characters survive by getting healed before the meter hits zero and they die. This run-down gets slower the higher the "Guts" stat[[note]]which also controls the chance of a [[CriticalHit Smaaaaash!]], and even survival of a fatal blow![[/note]] is. This makes players react quickly instead of anticipating death.

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* An extremely creative version in ''VideoGame/{{EarthBound}}''. Instead of getting instantly decreased, decreasing, the HP meter is an "odometer" that runs down to the new value gradually. This also allows Allowing fatally wounded characters to get off one more hit or survive by getting if they get healed before the meter hits zero and they die. This run-down gets slower the higher the "Guts" character's "[[HeroicSpirit Guts]]" stat[[note]]which also controls the chance of a [[CriticalHit Smaaaaash!]], and even survival of a fatal blow![[/note]] is. This makes players react quickly instead of anticipating death.
16th Oct '16 4:44:25 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'' throws out HitPoints and replaces them with a Toughness save. Success means the character shrugged off the attack/rolled with the punch/whatever fits the situation, while failure could result in anything from a bruise to a one-hit KO, depending on the margin.

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* ''MutantsAndMasterminds'' ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'' throws out HitPoints and replaces them with a Toughness save. Success means the character shrugged off the attack/rolled with the punch/whatever fits the situation, while failure could result in anything from a bruise to a one-hit KO, depending on the margin.



* HeroSystem has a variation--there is "body" and "stun"; stun recovers fast and body recovers slowly and represents real damage. Body points also don't scale to ridiculous values as your character "gains levels"; they're supposed to represent actual physical toughness, period, not the abstract "magical protections and evasive skill that slowly get eroded away" that D&D hit points represent. A more powerful version of SpiderMan, for example, wouldn't have more Body points, he'd instead be better at avoiding damage in the first place. Similarly, a more powerful version of TheHulk might only have a couple more Body points than a weak version of the Hulk, the difference instead being how high his Physical Defense and Energy Defense were (a character's defenses are subtracted from all incoming Stun and Body damage before it has a chance to affect them).

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* HeroSystem ''TabletopGame/HeroSystem'' has a variation--there is "body" and "stun"; stun recovers fast and body recovers slowly and represents real damage. Body points also don't scale to ridiculous values as your character "gains levels"; they're supposed to represent actual physical toughness, period, not the abstract "magical protections and evasive skill that slowly get eroded away" that D&D hit points represent. A more powerful version of SpiderMan, for example, wouldn't have more Body points, he'd instead be better at avoiding damage in the first place. Similarly, a more powerful version of TheHulk might only have a couple more Body points than a weak version of the Hulk, the difference instead being how high his Physical Defense and Energy Defense were (a character's defenses are subtracted from all incoming Stun and Body damage before it has a chance to affect them).



* Palladium, including {{Rifts}} and PFRPG, also keep separate track of lethal and non-lethal wounds. HitPoints represent actual injury, while S.D.C. (Structural Damage Capacity) represents the wind that can be knocked out of a football player without causing permanent damage. Most attacks go through your S.D.C. and only get to your Hit Points once those are depleted, and [[BodyArmorAsHitPoints armor adds another layer on top of that]]. To make things even more confusing, very tough creatures and objects (especially in {{Rifts}}) have M.D.C. (Mega Damage Capacity); despite the name, this represents the same physical integrity as Hit Points (not S.D.C.), but orders of magnitude higher.
* [[ProseDescriptiveQualities PDQ]] games have your skills and abilities ''as'' your hit points. Your abilities (called Qualities or Fortes, depending on the game) are ranked, and points of damage translate into penalties on those ranks - one point of damage means decreasing one Quality by one rank. It's up to the player which Qualities get penalized at the time, so in a fight you can decide your combat Qualities are the last to go - or the first, if you really want to throw the fight. Later games in the system added Story Hooks - whichever Quality took the first point of damage in a fight is also used to suggest plot elements of the next adventure (and allows players to vote for the kinds of adventures they want to see). This has lead to at least one description of ''Truth & Justice'' (the superhero PDQ game) as "a game where you can punch Spider-Man in the Girlfriend" and that's why Mary Jane is always in trouble.
* Warhammer uses a characteristic called "wounds" (W) for this purpose. The vast majority of models in the game have only a single wound, and are removed as casualties when they suffer a wound. Hero-level characters tend to have two wounds, meaning they can take twice as much damage as the rank and file, while Lords tend to have three (with some supernaturally tough exceptions, such as Mummy Tomb Kings). Monstrous Infantry, such as Ogres and Trolls, also tend to have three wounds, as do most war engines like cannons and catapults, while huge monsters like Giants, Dragons etc. often have as many as six.

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* Palladium, including {{Rifts}} TabletopGame/{{Rifts}} and PFRPG, also keep separate track of lethal and non-lethal wounds. HitPoints represent actual injury, while S.D.C. (Structural Damage Capacity) represents the wind that can be knocked out of a football player without causing permanent damage. Most attacks go through your S.D.C. and only get to your Hit Points once those are depleted, and [[BodyArmorAsHitPoints armor adds another layer on top of that]]. To make things even more confusing, very tough creatures and objects (especially in {{Rifts}}) have M.D.C. (Mega Damage Capacity); despite the name, this represents the same physical integrity as Hit Points (not S.D.C.), but orders of magnitude higher.
* [[ProseDescriptiveQualities PDQ]] ''TabletopGame/ProseDescriptiveQualities'' games have your skills and abilities ''as'' your hit points. Your abilities (called Qualities or Fortes, depending on the game) are ranked, and points of damage translate into penalties on those ranks - one point of damage means decreasing one Quality by one rank. It's up to the player which Qualities get penalized at the time, so in a fight you can decide your combat Qualities are the last to go - or the first, if you really want to throw the fight. Later games in the system added Story Hooks - whichever Quality took the first point of damage in a fight is also used to suggest plot elements of the next adventure (and allows players to vote for the kinds of adventures they want to see). This has lead to at least one description of ''Truth & Justice'' (the superhero PDQ game) as "a game where you can punch Spider-Man in the Girlfriend" and that's why Mary Jane is always in trouble.
* Warhammer ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' uses a characteristic called "wounds" (W) for this purpose. The vast majority of models in the game have only a single wound, and are removed as casualties when they suffer a wound. Hero-level characters tend to have two wounds, meaning they can take twice as much damage as the rank and file, while Lords tend to have three (with some supernaturally tough exceptions, such as Mummy Tomb Kings). Monstrous Infantry, such as Ogres and Trolls, also tend to have three wounds, as do most war engines like cannons and catapults, while huge monsters like Giants, Dragons etc. often have as many as six.
17th Aug '16 4:41:58 AM Galacton
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Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch]]s, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)

to:

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch]]s, {{MegatonPunch}}es, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)
17th Aug '16 4:40:44 AM Galacton
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Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch]]s, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get injured'' enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)

to:

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch]]s, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get injured'' hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)
17th Aug '16 4:38:34 AM Galacton
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Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshot wounds, explosions, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)

to:

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries caused by sword slices (gunshot wounds, (gunshots, explosions, {{MegatonPunch]]s, etc.), players get a number attributed to their character to clearly indicate how close (or far) from death they are. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Alternately, many games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' injured'' enough to be out of combat. (This explanation raises [[FridgeLogic problems of its own]] all too often, especially when you take healing potions and spells, which restore Hit Points, into consideration.)
16th Jun '16 5:01:44 AM erforce
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-->--''Webcomic/{{Adventurers}}''

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-->--''Webcomic/{{Adventurers}}''
-->-- ''Webcomic/{{Adventurers}}''



* ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' has a pretty unique way of going about this. You control two characters at once, but both of them are a OneHitPointWonder. Getting hit doesn't cost you a life, however. You just lose whomever you are controlling and take control of your partner, making your partner essentially your extra hit point, and you can get your lost character back by finding DK Barrels, "returning" your hit points from one back to two. ''Returns'' and ''Tropical Freeze'' play this more straight, where you are given a simple life meter with two hit points.

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* The original ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountry'' trilogy has a pretty unique way of going about this. You control two characters at once, but both of them are a OneHitPointWonder. Getting hit doesn't cost you a life, however. You just lose whomever you are controlling and take control of your partner, making your partner essentially your extra hit point, and you can get your lost character back by finding DK Barrels, "returning" your hit points from one back to two. ''Returns'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryReturns'' and ''Tropical Freeze'' ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryTropicalFreeze'' play this more straight, where you are given a simple life meter with two hit points.
26th Mar '16 8:52:23 AM MarqFJA
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* Instead of HP, the ''TabletopGame/True20'' roleplaying system makes you roll a saving throw any time you are injured to determine what happens to you. Multiple injuries make the difficulty rating higher, but there's always a chance of surviving any injury.

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* Instead of HP, the ''TabletopGame/True20'' ''TabletopGame/{{True20}}'' roleplaying system makes you roll a saving throw any time you are injured to determine what happens to you. Multiple injuries make the difficulty rating higher, but there's always a chance of surviving any injury.
23rd Feb '16 5:34:35 PM DanMat6288
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** The Mario RPG games (''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPGLegendOfTheSevenStars'', ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' series, and ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi'' series) refer to all player characters' health as '''Heart Points''', which are represented by little stylistic hearts.

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** The Mario RPG games (''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPGLegendOfTheSevenStars'', (''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'', ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' series, and ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi'' series) refer to all player characters' health as '''Heart Points''', which are represented by little stylistic hearts.
23rd Feb '16 5:33:38 PM DanMat6288
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Added DiffLines:

** The Mario RPG games (''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPGLegendOfTheSevenStars'', ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' series, and ''VideoGame/MarioAndLuigi'' series) refer to all player characters' health as '''Heart Points''', which are represented by little stylistic hearts.
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