History Main / HitmanWithAHeart

20th Aug '16 12:10:57 AM Scoutstr295
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* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Kuklinski Richard "The Iceman" Kuklinski]], one of the most infamous and prolific contract killers in history, claimed to have had a strict policy against murdering women and children. Whether this is true is disputed due to [[DomesticAbuser accounts of Kuklinski's home life]].
4th Aug '16 8:02:21 PM Thainen
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* The main character of ''ComicBook/IKilledAdolfHitler'' is portrayed as a sympathetic guy capable of love. In his world it's just a normal legal job.
1st Aug '16 7:56:17 PM Willbyr
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* Both Ein and Zwei of PhantomOfInferno follow this trope, to some degree or other.

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* Both Ein and Zwei of PhantomOfInferno ''VisualNovel/PhantomOfInferno'' follow this trope, to some degree or other.
29th Jul '16 6:05:24 AM InfectedBlood
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* ''Webcomic/TheGreenEyedSniper'': Shanti is an assassin who targets only untouchable criminals and would never hurt an innocent.
22nd Jul '16 2:09:27 PM margdean56
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* As mentioned above it's not entirely uncommon for mob hitmen and other such figures to be this, refusing to take jobs that involve hurting innocent people. Of course it's also not uncommon for this to be done out for [[PragmaticVillainy pragmatic reasons]] (murdering innocent people is a lot more likely to get the cops on your tail, and career criminals tend to [[EvenEvilHasStandards despise people who harm the disabled, defenseless, or young]], hence why child killers or molesters rarely last long in prison without constant protection. Mobsters also tend to drop members or hitmen who harm people not involved in their "business" since, as previously mentioned, it brings down a lot more heat from police). And keep in mind that people like this tend to have [[BlueAndOrangeMorality pretty warped moral codes]] (they do kill people for a living after all).
* During a period of severe depression, Creator/AngelinaJolie actually tried to hire a hitman to ''kill her.'' He agreed to meet with her in person, and - calmly and kindly - [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming was able]] to ''talk her'' [[YouAreBetterThanYouThinkYouAre out of going through with it.]]

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* As mentioned above it's not entirely uncommon for mob hitmen and other such figures to be this, refusing to take jobs that involve hurting innocent people. Of course it's also not uncommon for this to be done out for [[PragmaticVillainy pragmatic reasons]] (murdering innocent people is a lot more likely to get the cops on your tail, and career criminals tend to [[EvenEvilHasStandards despise people who harm the disabled, defenseless, or young]], hence young]]; this is why child killers or molesters rarely last long in prison without constant protection. Mobsters also tend to drop members or hitmen who harm people not involved in their "business" since, as previously mentioned, it brings down a lot more heat from police). And keep in mind that people like this tend to have [[BlueAndOrangeMorality pretty warped moral codes]] (they do kill people for a living after all).
* During a period of severe depression, Creator/AngelinaJolie actually tried to hire a hitman to ''kill her.'' He agreed to meet with her in person, and - -- calmly and kindly - -- [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming was able]] to ''talk her'' [[YouAreBetterThanYouThinkYouAre ''[[YouAreBetterThanYouThinkYouAre out of going through with it.]]]]''
22nd Jul '16 2:06:16 PM margdean56
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* Rild-Sugata in Creator/RogerZelazny's ''Literature/LordOfLight'', who became a follower (or even the follower) of his original target. Rild is a religious assassin, directed by his Goddess (of Death, naturally) to kill this planet's version of the Buddha. Buddha is a fake, though - an immortal named Sam, who is trying to overthrow the Hindu pantheon (also immortal fakes). Rild converts to Buddhism (Samism?) and, it is strongly implied, becomes the real Buddha.

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* Rild-Sugata in Creator/RogerZelazny's ''Literature/LordOfLight'', who became a follower (or even the ''the'' follower) of his original target. Rild is a religious assassin, directed by his Goddess (of Death, naturally) to kill this planet's version of the Buddha. Buddha is a fake, though - -- an immortal named Sam, who is trying to overthrow the Hindu pantheon (also immortal fakes). Rild converts to Buddhism (Samism?) and, it is strongly implied, becomes the real Buddha.



* It might not fit exactly, but the Assassins' Guild in Pratchett's Literature/{{Discworld}} series has high moral standards, which essential bans non-contract targets from being killed (the rule is fairly un-policable though, so a few do indulge in this). Interestingly, the Thieves' Guild follows close to the same moral standards for their line of work, reduce collateral damage as much as possible.

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* It might not fit exactly, but the Assassins' Guild in Pratchett's Literature/{{Discworld}} series has high moral standards, which essential essentially bans non-contract targets from being killed (the rule is fairly un-policable un-policeable though, so a few do indulge in this). Interestingly, the Thieves' Guild follows close to the same moral standards for their line of work, to reduce collateral damage as much as possible.



--> To wit: Anyone worth Anhk-Morpork 10,000 or more was considered automatically capable of protecting themselves, or at least hiring people who could. Otherwise what was a person to do but sit with a loaded crossbow pointed at the door?

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--> To wit: Anyone worth Anhk-Morpork Ankh-Morpork 10,000 or more was considered automatically capable of protecting themselves, or at least hiring people who could. Otherwise what was a person to do but sit with a loaded crossbow pointed at the door?



* ''Literature/{{Graceling}}'' has Katsa, who, due to her [[CursedWithAwesome Killing Grace]], must work as her uncle, the king's, thug, and is meant to hurt and torture anyone who dares cross the king. She secretly resents this job, though, and with the help of friends and allies, runs a Council that helps people in need. She also can't stand harming innocent people, [[spoiler:which is made a point when she blatantly refuses to harm a man who was only trying to protect his children, despite her uncle's wishes knowing it could get her into trouble.]]

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* ''Literature/{{Graceling}}'' has Katsa, who, due to her [[CursedWithAwesome Killing Grace]], must work as her uncle, the king's, thug, and is meant to hurt and torture anyone who dares cross the king. She secretly resents this job, though, and with the help of friends and allies, runs a Council that helps people in need. She also can't stand harming innocent people, [[spoiler:which is made a point when she blatantly refuses to harm a man who was only trying to protect his children, despite her uncle's wishes wishes, knowing it could get her into trouble.]]



* The second book of ''Literature/{{TheRavenCycle}}'', ''The Dream Thieves'', introduces The Gray Man. He's assigned to hunt down the Graywaren and kill anyone who has it or gets in his way, but he's also very pleasant to the ladies of 300 Fox Way and quite polite. He even [[spoiler: falls for Maura and refuses to kill or kidnap Ronan.]]

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* The second book of ''Literature/{{TheRavenCycle}}'', ''Literature/{{The Raven Cycle}}'', ''The Dream Thieves'', introduces The Gray Man. He's assigned to hunt down the Graywaren and kill anyone who has it or gets in his way, but he's also very pleasant to the ladies of 300 Fox Way and quite polite. He even [[spoiler: falls for Maura and refuses to kill or kidnap Ronan.]]
22nd Jul '16 1:58:13 PM margdean56
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* ''Comicbook/{{Hitman}}'' features a number of assassins of varying degrees of callousness. The star of the book only kills people whom he regards as "deserving it" (ie. Mafia dons, super-criminals etc), although characters do point out the stupidity of this from time to time. He was also sick on Batman's boots once, which is awesome. The hero's best friend only acts the same for the sake of the friendship.
** One particular storyline had a Mafia boss that Tommy Monaghan had crossed agreeing to drop the vendetta in return for an unpaid hit... but Tommy quite reasonbly figured that the boss would pick someone that Tommy wouldn't consider deserving of death as the boss' way of punishing Tommy.
* Kev Hawkins, [=ex-SAS=] trooper and current assassin/dirty tricks man for the British Government, is portrayed as a colossally messed up loser who just happens to be rather good at killing people. He first appeared in the ComicBook ''ComicBook/TheAuthority''. A major plot point Kev wondering 'What if they order me to kill someone innocent'?

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* ''Comicbook/{{Hitman}}'' features a number of assassins of varying degrees of callousness. The star of the book only kills people whom he regards as "deserving it" (ie.(i.e. Mafia dons, super-criminals etc), although characters do point out the stupidity of this from time to time. He was also sick on Batman's boots once, which is awesome. The hero's best friend only acts the same for the sake of the friendship.
** One particular storyline had a Mafia boss that Tommy Monaghan had crossed agreeing to drop the vendetta in return for an unpaid hit... but Tommy quite reasonbly reasonably figured that the boss would pick someone that Tommy wouldn't consider deserving of death as the boss' boss's way of punishing Tommy.
* Kev Hawkins, [=ex-SAS=] trooper and current assassin/dirty tricks man for the British Government, is portrayed as a colossally messed up loser who just happens to be rather good at killing people. He first appeared in the ComicBook ''ComicBook/TheAuthority''. A major plot point is Kev wondering 'What if they order me to kill someone innocent'?



* Finnigan Sinister and Ramone Dexter from ''ComicBook/SinisterDexter'' follow this trope to a certain degree. While they adhere to the "Gun Shark Code" which means they won't kill police or innocents, they will happily take on any contract reasoning that the target must be guilty of something at leat since they have a price on their head.
* Miho is not only an assassin, she's likely the deadliest one - and the deadliest ''person'' - in ''ComicBook/SinCity''. Still, she usually sides with the good guys. Usually.

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* Finnigan Sinister and Ramone Dexter from ''ComicBook/SinisterDexter'' follow this trope to a certain degree. While they adhere to the "Gun Shark Code" which means they won't kill police or innocents, they will happily take on any contract contract, reasoning that the target must be guilty of something at leat least since they have a price on their head.
* Miho is not only an assassin, she's likely the deadliest one - -- and the deadliest ''person'' - -- in ''ComicBook/SinCity''. Still, she usually sides with the good guys. Usually.



* Comicbook/{{Deadpool}} is a merc who will gleefully kill his targets while spouting corny one-liners, but he does have standards. In a recent story he plans to draw out his evil clone by publicly threatening to do something he would never do - kill a child.

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* Comicbook/{{Deadpool}} is a merc who will gleefully kill his targets while spouting corny one-liners, but he does have standards. In a recent story he plans to draw out his evil clone by publicly threatening to do something he would never do - -- kill a child.
8th Jul '16 9:45:25 AM SLOOGOVS
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* Both Corvo and Daud can be seen as this in ''{{VideoGame/Dishonored}}''. Depending on how the player plays him, Corvo doesn't even have to kill a single person, instead subjecting his enemies to AFateWorseThanDeath. If fact, the player is encouraged to play the trope straight in order to achieve the best ending. Meanwhile, the game canonically depicts Daud as this, as he's torn with guilt over assassinating the Empress after seeing the consequences, and begs Corvo for forgiveness. The DLC expands on this by showing that Daud originally started as an assassin in order to get revenge on the corrupt nobles who preyed on the regular folk, and he recruited numerous disenfranchised citizens who had nowhere else to go into his ranks.

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* Both Corvo and Daud can be seen as this in ''{{VideoGame/Dishonored}}''. Depending on how the player plays him, Corvo doesn't even have to kill a single person, instead subjecting his enemies to AFateWorseThanDeath. If In fact, the player is encouraged to play the trope straight in order to achieve the best ending. Meanwhile, the game canonically depicts Daud as this, as he's torn with guilt over assassinating the Empress after seeing the consequences, and begs Corvo for forgiveness. The DLC expands on this by showing that Daud originally started as an assassin in order to get revenge on the corrupt nobles who preyed on the regular folk, and he recruited numerous disenfranchised citizens who had nowhere else to go into his ranks.
1st Jul '16 10:30:58 AM ChronoLegion
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* Francis in ''Film/MrRight'' has decided to stop being a hitman and now kills anyone who attempts to hire him, figuring they must be bad people.
12th Jun '16 4:02:19 PM nombretomado
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* Dorothy Gale from ''TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' is a sweet little girl, but she is hired by the eponymous wizard to assassinate the Witch of the West in exchange for being sent home. She kills the witch, and then returns to the Wizard to be paid.

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* Dorothy Gale from ''TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' ''Literature/TheWonderfulWizardOfOz'' is a sweet little girl, but she is hired by the eponymous wizard to assassinate the Witch of the West in exchange for being sent home. She kills the witch, and then returns to the Wizard to be paid.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HitmanWithAHeart