History Main / HitSoHardTheCalendarFeltIt

27th Dec '17 6:02:43 PM Arcorann
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* Chinese emperors had a tendency to declare a new era every few years, a practice dating back to the Han Dynasty and lasting up to the Ming Dynasty when it was abolished. This practice was also adopted by the Japanese, where it lasted until the Meiji Restoration.
16th Dec '17 4:04:56 PM FoxBluereaver
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* In ''Fanfic/PokemonResetBloodlines'', Professor Oak's research in making wild Pokémon less aggressive was very important to society. In fact, it was so important that when he succeeded in his endeavor (around forty years ago), it was dubbed the start of the Oak Era.
16th Dec '17 7:59:21 AM karstovich2
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** The last big change to Roman time was the Julian reform. The Roman calendar before UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar was a lunisolar one where each month corresponded to one cycle of phases of the Moon, and one year was twelve of these--except that every few years, an extra "intercalary" month would be added to make the year line up with the seasons. (The Hebrew calendar still works like this.) This created all kinds of problems, especially because the decision to add an intercalary month was made by the Pontifex Maximus, the chief priest of Rome. Invariably, the Pontifex Maximus was a politician (Caesar himself held the post from 63 B.C. until his death), which meant that he would invariably use his power to declare intercalary months to reward his friends with extra time in power or withhold months to punish his enemies with less. This got the calendar completely out of line with the seasons, and so Caesar (once he held such absolute power that he no longer needed to abuse his powers as Pontifex Maximus) started looking for a way to fix the calendar.\\

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** The last big change to Roman time was the Julian reform. The Roman calendar before UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar was a lunisolar one where each month roughly corresponded to one cycle of phases of the Moon, and one year was twelve of these--except that every few years, an extra "intercalary" month would be added to make the year line up with the seasons. (The Hebrew calendar still works like this.) This created all kinds of problems, especially because the decision to add an intercalary month was made by the Pontifex Maximus, the chief priest of Rome. Invariably, the Pontifex Maximus was a politician (Caesar himself held the post from 63 B.C. until his death), which meant that he would invariably use his power to declare intercalary months to reward his friends with extra time in power or withhold months to punish his enemies with less. This got the calendar completely out of line with the seasons, and so Caesar (once he held such absolute power that he no longer needed to abuse his powers as Pontifex Maximus) started looking for a way to fix the calendar.\\
16th Dec '17 7:58:30 AM karstovich2
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* The [[AncientRome ancient Romans]] dated their calendar from the foundation of the city of Rome -- ''AbUrbeCondita'' or A.V.C.. Their original calendar divided the year into ten months: ''Martius'' (Mars(=Ares)'s (Mars being the god of war ''and'' farming, activities beginning in the spring)), ''Aprilis'' (Opening, ''i.e.'' of buds), ''Maius'' (Maia (a fertility goddess)'s), ''Iunius'' (Juno(=Hera)'s),[[note]]the rest show a distinct lack of imagination[[/note]] ''Quintilis'' (Fifth), ''Sextilis'' (Sixth), ''September'' (Seventh), ''October'' (Eighth), ''November'' (Ninth), and ''December'' (Tenth). The remaining two months' worth of time were not assigned to any month. When the ten month calendar proved unworkable, the unassigned time was divided into two new months at the end of the year, ''Ianuarius'' (Opening or Janus's) and ''Februarius'' (Purification, referring to a winter festival). This change is attributed to Numa Pompilius, the legendary second king of Rome. In the 2nd century B.C., the beginning of the year was shifted from March to January in order to allow the newly-elected consuls to be ready for battle by the start of the campaigning season (spring).
** UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, when reforming the calendar (and naming the whole system after himself) renamed ''Quintilis'', the month in which he had been born, ''Iulius'' after himself, and Augustus renamed the following month ''Augustus'' after himself to commemorate the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Actium Battle of Actium]]. The Julian reforms primarily consisted of lengthening the existing months and doing away with the irregular "intercalary" months used to adjust the length of the previous system, which were subject to manipulation by the Pontifex Maximus, who was invariably deeply involved in Roman politics.
** Speaking of the consuls, the other (and more frequently used) major Roman dating method involved referring to a particular year as "[the year] ''X'' and ''Y'' being consul," which, naturally, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin was the year when the two individuals in question were consul]]. During one of Julius Caesar's consulates, his co-consul was such a pushover that people took to referring to that period as "Julius and Caesar being consul."

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* The [[AncientRome ancient Romans]] dated their Roman]] calendar has a few:
** The Romans did not usually use a continuous numbering system for their years, the way we do. Unique years were identified with reference to the political leadership of the state. Under the monarchy, this meant regnal years (the Xth year of King Y's reign). Under the Republic, they referred to the years as "[the year] ''X'' and ''Y'' being consul," which, naturally, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin was the year when the two individuals in question were consul]]. (During one of Julius Caesar's consulates, his co-consul was such a pushover that people took to referring to that period as "Julius and Caesar being consul.") The consular-year naming continued after Augustus overthrew the Republic and established the Principate form of the Empire (in which the Republic nominally still ran like it used to and the Emperor was JustTheFirstCitizen). However, after the Crisis of the Third Century, Diocletian's Dominate (basically the Empire saying, "why yes the Emperor is a king"), regnal years came back into use. When the Romans had to use a continuously-numbered calendar (e.g. in histories), they counted years
from the foundation of the city of Rome -- ''AbUrbeCondita'' or A.V.C.. Their
** The Roman months are also worth a mention. The
original Roman calendar divided the year into ten months: ''Martius'' (Mars(=Ares)'s (Mars being the god of war ''and'' farming, activities beginning in the spring)), ''Aprilis'' (Opening, ''i.e.'' of buds), ''Maius'' (Maia (a fertility goddess)'s), ''Iunius'' (Juno(=Hera)'s),[[note]]the rest show a distinct lack of imagination[[/note]] ''Quintilis'' (Fifth), ''Sextilis'' (Sixth), ''September'' (Seventh), ''October'' (Eighth), ''November'' (Ninth), and ''December'' (Tenth). The remaining two months' worth of time were not assigned to any month. When the ten month calendar proved unworkable, the unassigned time was divided into two new months at the end of the year, ''Ianuarius'' (Opening or Janus's) and ''Februarius'' (Purification, referring to a winter festival). This change is attributed to Numa Pompilius, the legendary second king of Rome.
** Also with the months:
In the 2nd century B.C., the beginning of the year was shifted from March to January in order to allow the newly-elected consuls to be ready for battle by the start of the campaigning season (spring).
(spring). This change also seems to reflect a change in social practices at least a century earlier.
** UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar, when reforming The last big change to Roman time was the Julian reform. The Roman calendar before UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar was a lunisolar one where each month corresponded to one cycle of phases of the Moon, and one year was twelve of these--except that every few years, an extra "intercalary" month would be added to make the year line up with the seasons. (The Hebrew calendar still works like this.) This created all kinds of problems, especially because the decision to add an intercalary month was made by the Pontifex Maximus, the chief priest of Rome. Invariably, the Pontifex Maximus was a politician (Caesar himself held the post from 63 B.C. until his death), which meant that he would invariably use his power to declare intercalary months to reward his friends with extra time in power or withhold months to punish his enemies with less. This got the calendar (and naming completely out of line with the whole system after himself) seasons, and so Caesar (once he held such absolute power that he no longer needed to abuse his powers as Pontifex Maximus) started looking for a way to fix the calendar.\\
\\
Caesar found what he was looking for in Egypt. While chasing Pompey around the Eastern Mediterranean, he encountered the Ancient Egyptian calendar, which ignored the Moon completely and simply made every month 30 days long, with an additional 5 days belonging to no month as a kind of festival time at the end of the year. Caesar liked this system, although he had two problems with it: it still meant the dates would get out of line with the seasons (the Egyptians knew this, but didn't care as much because of some religious stuff they had about the first rising of Sirius, plus the problem fixed itself every 1460 years, which the Egyptians were OK with it seems), and the concept of days with no month annoyed him for some reason. To address the first problem, he added a sixth additional day to the year every fourth year (which one of the Ptolemaic Greek Kings of Egypt had tried to do about 200 years earlier, but the Egyptians had resisted for the aforementioned religious reasons, and probably also as a way of thumbing their nose at the Greeks), and assigned each of the additional days to a month of the year. To address the second problem, the six days were distributed among the months of the year. To commemorate these changes, Caesar then
renamed ''Quintilis'', the month in which he had been born, ''Iulius'' after himself, and himself. Augustus renamed would then rename the following month ''Augustus'' after himself to commemorate the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Actium Battle of Actium]]. The Julian reforms primarily consisted of lengthening the existing months and doing away with the irregular "intercalary" months used to adjust the length of the previous system, which were subject to manipulation by the Pontifex Maximus, who was invariably deeply involved in Roman politics.
** Speaking of the consuls, the other (and more frequently used) major Roman dating method involved referring to a particular year as "[the year] ''X'' and ''Y'' being consul," which, naturally, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin was the year when the two individuals in question were consul]]. During one of Julius Caesar's consulates, his co-consul was such a pushover that people took to referring to that period as "Julius and Caesar being consul."
11th Dec '17 8:11:04 PM SilverHammed
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* In ''LordOfTheRings'', the story begins in the year T.A. 3018, where T.A. stands for "third age" (meaning they'd already reset the calendar at least twice), and by the end of the story, a fourth age is declared.

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* In ''LordOfTheRings'', ''Literature/LordOfTheRings'', the story begins in the year T.A. 3018, where T.A. stands for "third age" (meaning they'd already reset the calendar at least twice), and by the end of the story, a fourth age is declared.



* In ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'', time is divided into BBY and ABY, before and after the Battle of Yavin (in order to distinguish prequels from the original trilogy).

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* In ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'', time is divided into BBY and ABY, before and after the [[Film/ANewHope Battle of Yavin Yavin]] (in order to distinguish prequels from the original trilogy).



*** Actually the Expanded Universe gives us a lot of various calendars, which when you're talking about a galaxy-wide civilization across over 35,000 years of history, millions of planets and quadrillions of beings, makes sense. You've got the Tho Yor Arrival calendar, dating from when the first arks brought the pilgrims to Tython that would eventually found the Jedi Knights roughly 35,000 years before the movies, then you've got the Republic Year calendar dating from when the Galactic Republic was founded (roughly 25,000 years before the movies), the Tapani Calendar (started roughly 12,000 years before the films, used in one sector dating to when settlers first arrived there, and using a different length of year localized to the area), the After the Treaty of Coruscant dating to the treaty that set in motion the events of the ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' MMO, plus the Great Resynchronization calendar, an in-universe attempt to create a new standard calendar to cut through the variety of calendars in use (it puts Year Zero as 3 years before Episode I), and the Imperial Year dating to Palpatine's declaration of a New order in Episode III, and lastly the Before the Battle of Yavin/After the Battle of Yavin calendar dating to the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, which is taking the calendar most widely used by fans and making it an in-universe calendar. It's a lot of systems, but it's a big galaxy with a lot of history.

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*** Actually the Expanded Universe gives us a lot of various calendars, which when you're talking about a galaxy-wide civilization across over 35,000 years of history, millions of planets and quadrillions of beings, makes sense. You've got the Tho Yor Arrival calendar, dating from when the first arks brought the pilgrims to Tython that would eventually found the Jedi Knights roughly 35,000 years before the movies, then you've got the Republic Year calendar dating from when the Galactic Republic was founded (roughly 25,000 years before the movies), the Tapani Calendar (started roughly 12,000 years before the films, used in one sector dating to when settlers first arrived there, and using a different length of year localized to the area), the After the Treaty of Coruscant dating to the treaty that set in motion the events of the ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' ''VideoGame/StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' MMO, plus the Great Resynchronization calendar, an in-universe attempt to create a new standard calendar to cut through the variety of calendars in use (it puts Year Zero as 3 years before [[Film/ThePhantomMenace Episode I), I]]), and the Imperial Year dating to Palpatine's declaration of a New order in [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith Episode III, III]], and lastly the Before the Battle of Yavin/After the Battle of Yavin calendar dating to the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, which is taking the calendar most widely used by fans and making it an in-universe calendar. It's a lot of systems, but it's a big galaxy with a lot of history.
13th Nov '17 8:49:38 PM Vilui
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* The calendar was reset at some point in ''Literature/FromTheNewWorld'', due to the [[EverybodysDeadDave long dark ages of mass slaughtering by psychics]]. They're currently in the 200's. [[spoiler:It actually seems to have been running for roughly the length of [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld Tomiko's life]], and may have been reset again because of K's rampage.]] There doesn't seem to be much communication between distant villages, either, so they may all be using different calendars.

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* The calendar was reset at some point in ''Literature/FromTheNewWorld'', due to the [[EverybodysDeadDave long dark ages of mass slaughtering by psychics]]. They're currently in the 200's.200s. [[spoiler:It actually seems to have been running for roughly the length of [[ReallySevenHundredYearsOld Tomiko's life]], and may have been reset again because of K's rampage.]] There doesn't seem to be much communication between distant villages, either, so they may all be using different calendars.
17th Oct '17 6:56:26 AM Arcorann
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* In ''Franchise/StarWars'', time is divided into BBY and ABY, before and after the Battle of Yavin (in order to distinguish prequels from the original trilogy).
** The Expanded Universe gives at least two more times this happens prior to Yavin (namely, the respective foundings of the Republic and the Empire). Luke complains about it in ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'', as it makes reviewing historical records rather tedious.
*** Actually the Expanded Universe gives us a lot of various calendars, which when you're talking about a galaxy-wide civilization across over 35,000 years of history, millions of planets and quadrillions of beings, makes sense. You've got the Tho Yor Arrival calendar, dating from when the first arks brought the pilgrims to Tython that would eventually found the Jedi Knights roughly 35,000 years before the movies, then you've got the Republic Year calendar dating from when the Galactic Republic was founded (roughly 25,000 years before the movies), the Tapani Calendar (started roughly 12,000 years before the films, used in one sector dating to when settlers first arrived there, and using a different length of year localized to the area), the After the Treaty of Coruscant dating to the treaty that set in motion the events of the ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' MMO, plus the Great Resynchronization calendar, an in-universe attempt to create a new standard calendar to cut through the variety of calendars in use (it puts Year Zero as 3 years before Episode I), and the Imperial Year dating to Palpatine's declaration of a New order in Episode III, and lastly the Before the Battle of Yavin/After the Battle of Yavin calendar dating to the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, which is taking the calendar most widely used by fans and making it an in-universe calendar. It's a lot of systems, but it's a big galaxy with a lot of history.


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* In ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'', time is divided into BBY and ABY, before and after the Battle of Yavin (in order to distinguish prequels from the original trilogy).
** The Expanded Universe gives at least two more times this happens prior to Yavin (namely, the respective foundings of the Republic and the Empire). Luke complains about it in ''Literature/TheThrawnTrilogy'', as it makes reviewing historical records rather tedious.
*** Actually the Expanded Universe gives us a lot of various calendars, which when you're talking about a galaxy-wide civilization across over 35,000 years of history, millions of planets and quadrillions of beings, makes sense. You've got the Tho Yor Arrival calendar, dating from when the first arks brought the pilgrims to Tython that would eventually found the Jedi Knights roughly 35,000 years before the movies, then you've got the Republic Year calendar dating from when the Galactic Republic was founded (roughly 25,000 years before the movies), the Tapani Calendar (started roughly 12,000 years before the films, used in one sector dating to when settlers first arrived there, and using a different length of year localized to the area), the After the Treaty of Coruscant dating to the treaty that set in motion the events of the ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' MMO, plus the Great Resynchronization calendar, an in-universe attempt to create a new standard calendar to cut through the variety of calendars in use (it puts Year Zero as 3 years before Episode I), and the Imperial Year dating to Palpatine's declaration of a New order in Episode III, and lastly the Before the Battle of Yavin/After the Battle of Yavin calendar dating to the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, which is taking the calendar most widely used by fans and making it an in-universe calendar. It's a lot of systems, but it's a big galaxy with a lot of history.
17th Oct '17 6:51:47 AM Arcorann
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* One of the proofs that the Holy Britannian Empire is ''the'' most dominant force on Earth in Anime/CodeGeass universe, the calendar doesn't follow the real world AD/CE - instead, we have A.T.B, for "Ascension to Throne, Britannia". This roughly coincides with about -60 BC, when the in-universe history diverges (the reason being that Julius Caesar never conquered Britain; the Anglo-Saxons elected a "super leader" to fight him instead and won, amongst all the historical variance in that universe which included a failed American Revolution and a change of seat of power from mainland Britain to American Colonies).

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* One of the proofs that the Holy Britannian Empire is ''the'' most dominant force on Earth in Anime/CodeGeass universe, the calendar doesn't follow the real world AD/CE - instead, we have A.T.B, for "Ascension to Throne, Britannia". This roughly coincides with about -60 BC, when Britannia", counting from the in-universe history diverges (the reason being establishment of the first Celtic King in the Britannian royal line, rather than the birth of Christ. Closer to this trope is the Revolutionary Calendar used by the EU, a variant of the French Republican Calendar that Julius Caesar never conquered Britain; sets its first year to 1790, the Anglo-Saxons elected a "super leader" to fight him instead and won, amongst all year after the historical variance in that universe which included a failed American Revolution and a change of seat of power from mainland Britain to American Colonies).French Revolution.
14th Oct '17 3:40:17 PM rosvicl
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* Very little written records survive about UsefulNotes/TheVikingAge, and no primary sources written from the Viking perspective but the impact they made on culture left many traces in culture, traces that remained even when Myth/NorseMythology was forgotten from cultural memory and all the Vikings had converted to Christianity and abandoned their polytheistic beliefs. What are these traces, well in Continental Europe, the days of the week are named after Roman and Greek deities and the names used in the Latin and Roman era. In the Anglophone however, local gods were used:

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* Very little few written records survive about UsefulNotes/TheVikingAge, and no primary sources written from the Viking perspective but the impact they made on culture left many traces in culture, traces that remained even when Myth/NorseMythology was forgotten from cultural memory and all the Vikings had converted to Christianity and abandoned their polytheistic beliefs. What are these traces, well in Continental Europe, the days of the week are named after Roman and Greek deities and the names used in the Latin and Roman era. In the Anglophone however, local gods were used:
13th Oct '17 1:21:09 PM Silverstaff
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***Actually the Expanded Universe gives us a lot of various calendars, which when you're talking about a galaxy-wide civilization across over 35,000 years of history, millions of planets and quadrillions of beings, makes sense. You've got the Tho Yor Arrival calendar, dating from when the first arks brought the pilgrims to Tython that would eventually found the Jedi Knights roughly 35,000 years before the movies, then you've got the Republic Year calendar dating from when the Galactic Republic was founded (roughly 25,000 years before the movies), the Tapani Calendar (started roughly 12,000 years before the films, used in one sector dating to when settlers first arrived there, and using a different length of year localized to the area), the After the Treaty of Coruscant dating to the treaty that set in motion the events of the ''StarWarsTheOldRepublic'' MMO, plus the Great Resynchronization calendar, an in-universe attempt to create a new standard calendar to cut through the variety of calendars in use (it puts Year Zero as 3 years before Episode I), and the Imperial Year dating to Palpatine's declaration of a New order in Episode III, and lastly the Before the Battle of Yavin/After the Battle of Yavin calendar dating to the events of Star Wars: A New Hope, which is taking the calendar most widely used by fans and making it an in-universe calendar. It's a lot of systems, but it's a big galaxy with a lot of history.
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