History Main / HitPoints

29th Jan '18 10:58:48 AM Adven1966
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* ''VideoGame/ClarencesBigChance'': You can restore them by eating literal hearts. Lampshaded;
-->"Like so many cyberland characters, Clarence, you can rejuvenate your vim by devouring the hearts of your fallen victims. Go on. Give 'em a scoff to fill up your lovely heart points and stave off death for another day."
3rd Jan '18 10:13:12 AM Malady
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They're often displayed in a LifeMeter.

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They're often displayed in a LifeMeter.
LifeMeter, which is a subtrope.
15th Dec '17 3:47:26 PM WaterBlap
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In most video games centered around combat, HitPoints are a measure of how close to [[GameOver death]] or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.

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In most video games centered around combat, HitPoints Hit Points are a measure of how close to [[GameOver death]] or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.



* Pretty much any FirstPersonShooter released before 2001's ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' will use traditional HitPoints. Most, but not all, released afterward will use RegeneratingHealth. A few, like the aforementioned ''Halo'' will use both, typically represented with a second LifeMeter, usually called something like "Stamina" or "Shields." For the most part, healing items will only improve the non-regenerating side.

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* Pretty much any FirstPersonShooter released before 2001's ''VideoGame/HaloCombatEvolved'' will use traditional HitPoints.Hit Points. Most, but not all, released afterward will use RegeneratingHealth. A few, like the aforementioned ''Halo'' will use both, typically represented with a second LifeMeter, usually called something like "Stamina" or "Shields." For the most part, healing items will only improve the non-regenerating side.



* ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'' throws out HitPoints and replaces them with a Toughness save. Success means the character shrugged off the attack/rolled with the punch/whatever fits the situation, while failure could result in anything from a bruise to a one-hit KO, depending on the margin.

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* ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'' throws out HitPoints Hit Points and replaces them with a Toughness save. Success means the character shrugged off the attack/rolled with the punch/whatever fits the situation, while failure could result in anything from a bruise to a one-hit KO, depending on the margin.



* Palladium, including TabletopGame/{{Rifts}} and PFRPG, also keep separate track of lethal and non-lethal wounds. HitPoints represent actual injury, while S.D.C. (Structural Damage Capacity) represents the wind that can be knocked out of a football player without causing permanent damage. Most attacks go through your S.D.C. and only get to your Hit Points once those are depleted, and [[BodyArmorAsHitPoints armor adds another layer on top of that]]. To make things even more confusing, very tough creatures and objects (especially in {{TabletopGame/Rifts}}) have M.D.C. (Mega Damage Capacity); despite the name, this represents the same physical integrity as Hit Points (not S.D.C.), but orders of magnitude higher.

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* Palladium, including TabletopGame/{{Rifts}} and PFRPG, also keep separate track of lethal and non-lethal wounds. HitPoints Hit Points represent actual injury, while S.D.C. (Structural Damage Capacity) represents the wind that can be knocked out of a football player without causing permanent damage. Most attacks go through your S.D.C. and only get to your Hit Points once those are depleted, and [[BodyArmorAsHitPoints armor adds another layer on top of that]]. To make things even more confusing, very tough creatures and objects (especially in {{TabletopGame/Rifts}}) have M.D.C. (Mega Damage Capacity); despite the name, this represents the same physical integrity as Hit Points (not S.D.C.), but orders of magnitude higher.
20th Nov '17 10:55:31 AM Angeldeb82
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Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries, players get a number or LifeMeter attributed to their character to indicate their current condition. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Some games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of non videogame tropes such as PlotArmor and HeroicResolve, or actual health vs. injury: As a character's HP drops, it's ostensibly their talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as they get more tired and desperate, until they ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat.

This trope can be directly traced from the original ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', right down [[TropeNamer to the name]]. Since then, it's been used in genres as diverse as FirstPersonShooter, RolePlayingGame, and RealTimeStrategy, and is nigh-universal for each, due to its usefulness for programmers (the alternative is OneHitpointWonder where any damage is immediately fatal). On some occasions, the number itself is hidden and only a LifeMeter is shown to represent damage. SurvivalHorror games favor foregoing even that, and simply displaying one of three to four colors in the status screen to indicate the player's well-being.

to:

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries, players get a number or LifeMeter attributed to their character to indicate their current condition. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Some games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) {{Tabletop RPG}}s) may HandWave it as an abstraction of non videogame tropes such as PlotArmor and HeroicResolve, or actual health vs. injury: As a character's HP drops, it's ostensibly their talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as they get more tired and desperate, until they ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat.

This trope can be directly traced from the original ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', right down [[TropeNamer to the name]]. Since then, it's been used in genres as diverse as FirstPersonShooter, RolePlayingGame, and RealTimeStrategy, and is nigh-universal for each, due to its usefulness for programmers (the alternative is OneHitpointWonder OneHitPointWonder where any damage is immediately fatal). On some occasions, the number itself is hidden and only a LifeMeter is shown to represent damage. SurvivalHorror games favor foregoing even that, and simply displaying one of three to four colors in the status screen to indicate the player's well-being.
28th Oct '17 1:32:34 PM FordPrefect
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In most video games centered around combat, HitPoints are measure how close to [[GameOver death]], or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.

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In most video games centered around combat, HitPoints are a measure of how close to [[GameOver death]], death]] or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.
22nd Oct '17 6:30:51 PM KandC
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** In the unreleased game ''VideoGame/StarFox2'', the entire planet of Corneria has a percent-based hit point count.

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** In the unreleased game Similarly, in ''VideoGame/StarFox2'', the entire planet of Corneria has a percent-based hit point count.
22nd Oct '17 10:25:51 AM nombretomado
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* The ''BushidoBlade'' fighting series used aversion of this trope as a selling point. Unlike most fighting games that use HP bars, Bushido Blade lets you fight just until you receive a lethal injury. A solid hit to the head or body ends the match right there. Hitting an arm or leg would disable that limb--if both your legs are crippled, you can't even stand up.

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* The ''BushidoBlade'' ''VideoGame/BushidoBlade'' fighting series used aversion of this trope as a selling point. Unlike most fighting games that use HP bars, Bushido Blade lets you fight just until you receive a lethal injury. A solid hit to the head or body ends the match right there. Hitting an arm or leg would disable that limb--if both your legs are crippled, you can't even stand up.
9th Aug '17 2:13:21 PM Galacton
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Most video games are centered around combat. HitPoints measure how close to [[GameOver death]], or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries, players get a number or LifeMeter attributed to their character to indicate their current status. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Some games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, HeroicResolve, and actual health vs. injury: As your HP drops, it's ostensibly your talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you get more tired and desperate, until you ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat.

This trope can be directly traced from the original ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', right down [[TropeNamer to the name]]. Since then, it's been used in genres as diverse as FirstPersonShooter, RolePlayingGame, and RealTimeStrategy, and is nigh-universal for each, due to its usefulness for programmers (the alternative is the OneHitpointWonder). On some occasions, the number itself is hidden and only a LifeMeter is shown to represent damage. SurvivalHorror games favor foregoing even that, and simply displaying one of three to four colors in the status screen to indicate the player's well-being.

to:

Most In most video games are centered around combat. combat, HitPoints are measure how close to [[GameOver death]], or [[NonLethalKO incapacitation]] a character is.

Rather than bothering to simulate realistic injuries, players get a number or LifeMeter attributed to their character to indicate their current status.condition. It's like a time-irrelevant take on ExactTimeToFailure in that [[CriticalExistenceFailure only losing the last one]] causes any real harm. Some games (especially [[TabletopRPG Tabletop [=RPGs=]]]) may HandWave it as an abstraction of both PlotArmor, non videogame tropes such as PlotArmor and HeroicResolve, and or actual health vs. injury: As your a character's HP drops, it's ostensibly your their talent/luck at dodging, deflecting and absorbing the worst blows dropping as you they get more tired and desperate, until you they ''actually get hurt'' badly enough to be out of combat.

This trope can be directly traced from the original ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', right down [[TropeNamer to the name]]. Since then, it's been used in genres as diverse as FirstPersonShooter, RolePlayingGame, and RealTimeStrategy, and is nigh-universal for each, due to its usefulness for programmers (the alternative is the OneHitpointWonder).OneHitpointWonder where any damage is immediately fatal). On some occasions, the number itself is hidden and only a LifeMeter is shown to represent damage. SurvivalHorror games favor foregoing even that, and simply displaying one of three to four colors in the status screen to indicate the player's well-being.
5th Aug '17 7:37:53 AM SeptimusHeap
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* In the VideoGame adaptation of ''SupermanReturns'', the titular hero doesn't have hit points ... rather, the city does.

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* In the VideoGame adaptation of ''SupermanReturns'', ''Film/SupermanReturns'', the titular hero doesn't have hit points ... rather, the city does.
2nd Aug '17 3:28:05 PM thatmadork
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[[caption-width-right:350:BAM!]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:BAM!]]
[[caption-width-right:350:BAM! You just got Tyrannosaurus [[{{Pun}} Wrecked]]!]]
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