History Main / HijackedByJesus

13th Feb '18 5:29:59 AM Samx
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1 Corinthians 10:20
“But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils.”

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1 **1 Corinthians 10:20
10:20 “But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils.”
13th Feb '18 5:28:56 AM Samx
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* The Bible actually has a position on this, equating pagan gods into actual devils. In other words, all pagan religion to Christianity is an actual work of demons rebelling against God, whether or not the religion predated Christianity (as God, if He exists, existed before Christianity):
1 Corinthians 10:20
“But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils.”
5th Feb '18 6:01:52 PM nombretomado
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* An interesting variation took place in a ChristmasEpisode of ''NorthernExposure'', where the town of Cicily combined Christmas traditions with the local tribe's "Raven Festival", based on the story of [[TheTrickster Raven]] and the Sun-Holder's Daughter. While this is a traditional Raven story among some tribes and the depiction in the show is fairly accurate, it does make Raven seem like a CrystalDragonJesus. In one of the few points where Joel's receptionist [[TheQuietOne Marilyn Whirlwind]] spoke more than a few words at a time, she told the story to Joel:

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* An interesting variation took place in a ChristmasEpisode of ''NorthernExposure'', ''Series/NorthernExposure'', where the town of Cicily combined Christmas traditions with the local tribe's "Raven Festival", based on the story of [[TheTrickster Raven]] and the Sun-Holder's Daughter. While this is a traditional Raven story among some tribes and the depiction in the show is fairly accurate, it does make Raven seem like a CrystalDragonJesus. In one of the few points where Joel's receptionist [[TheQuietOne Marilyn Whirlwind]] spoke more than a few words at a time, she told the story to Joel:
24th Jan '18 7:31:37 AM Ramidel
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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' publishes a "Deities and Demigods" supplement with most editions. While some of the entries are original pantheons made up from scratch by the company, there are also sections on Egyptian, Greek, and Norse mythology which take this trope UpToEleven. Somehow, even the _Egyptian_ pantheon gets a Satan.
** Even weirder, Egyptian Satan is apparently Apep, of all things.

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* ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' publishes a "Deities and Demigods" supplement with most editions. While some of the entries are original pantheons made up from scratch by the company, there are also sections on Egyptian, Greek, and Norse mythology which take this trope UpToEleven. Somehow, even the _Egyptian_ pantheon gets a Satan.\n** Even weirder, Egyptian Satan is apparently Apep, of all things.
20th Jan '18 10:00:50 AM DaibhidC
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* Parodied in a ''Radio/JohnFinnemoresSouvenirProgramme'' skit about the Labours of Hercules, when King Eurystheus asks Hades to go to Hell and get Satan's dog. When Hercules questions this, Eurystheus replies "Well, whatever we call him. You know who I mean: Hell boss. The big bad."

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* Parodied in a ''Radio/JohnFinnemoresSouvenirProgramme'' skit about the Labours of Hercules, when King Eurystheus asks Hades Hercules to go to Hell and get Satan's dog. When Hercules questions this, Eurystheus replies "Well, whatever we call him. You know who I mean: Hell boss. The big bad."
20th Jan '18 9:57:56 AM DaibhidC
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Radio]]
*Parodied in a ''Radio/JohnFinnemoresSouvenirProgramme'' skit about the Labours of Hercules, when King Eurystheus asks Hades to go to Hell and get Satan's dog. When Hercules questions this, Eurystheus replies "Well, whatever we call him. You know who I mean: Hell boss. The big bad."
[[/folder]]
30th Dec '17 1:19:54 PM Naram-Sin
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* When dealing with Ancient Greece in The Knight's Tale, [[Literature/TheCanterburyTales Chaucer]] is mostly accommodating of the fact that they were pre-Christian, but does have some small slips like having them observe Sundays.

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* When dealing with Ancient Greece in The ''The Knight's Tale, Tale'', [[Literature/TheCanterburyTales Chaucer]] is mostly accommodating of the fact that they were pre-Christian, but does have some small slips like having them observe Sundays.



* ''{{Literature/Beowulf}}'' scholars believe that the 8th century poem is an adaptation of a Pagan epic from at least the century before, and that several elements in the story were introduced to make it resonate better with contemporary Christian audiences. These include Beowulf invoking God, Grendel and his mother being descendants of Cain and unable to hurt Hrothgar in his throne (because Christians believed that kings were protected by God) and Grendel's Mother's lair being protected by snakes (associated with Pagans and the Devil in Christianity). The final act with an elderly Beowulf fighting a dragon may have been entirely lifted from a Christian story (St. George or similar) and tacked after ([[RiddleForTheAges or over]]) the original Pagan's end.



** In Brazil, however, many (if not all) slaves had at some point in history struggled for the right to be Christians, with and without the help of Jesuits and former slaves, for their masters saw Christianity and any religion as a risk to they. And through religious syncretism most practitioners consider themselves Catholics (or at least Christians) anyway. One proof of this is that giving up your religion for another Christian religion such as Neo-Pentecostalism or becoming an atheist is much more common, while becoming pagan is something rare and condemned by practitioners of these religions.

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** In Brazil, however, many (if not all) slaves had at some point in history struggled for the right to be Christians, with and without the help of Jesuits and former slaves, for their masters saw Christianity and any religion as a risk to they.them. And through religious syncretism most practitioners consider themselves Catholics (or at least Christians) anyway. One proof of this is that giving up your religion for another Christian religion such as Neo-Pentecostalism or becoming an atheist is much more common, while becoming pagan is something rare and condemned by practitioners of these religions.
23rd Dec '17 6:59:16 AM Calllack
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It should be noted that [[TruthInTelevision this has happened]] a number of times historically. As proselytizing sects spread into new regions, they often incorporate existing beliefs into their canon, in order to make the new religion more palatable to others. For example, the medieval story of the hermit Josaphat (not to be mistaken with the King Jehoshaphat of Judea, or the 17th-century martyr St. Josaphat) was a Christianized version of the life of Gautama Buddha (with "Bodhisattva" mutating into "Josaphat"). Often, polytheistic cultures "converted" to Christianity simply transferred the worship of individual gods to the ''saints'' that most resembled them (in some cases, the old pagan gods were remade ''into'' saints). The Catholic church in particular got ''a lot'' of mileage out of this and seeing some procession for some saint in e.g. Latin America, it's not hard at all to imagine what the religious customs prior to Christianity may have looked like.

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It should be noted that [[TruthInTelevision this has happened]] a number of times historically. As proselytizing sects spread into new regions, they often incorporate existing beliefs into their canon, in order to make the new religion more palatable to others. For example, the medieval story of the hermit Josaphat (not to be mistaken with the King Jehoshaphat of Judea, or the 17th-century martyr St. Josaphat) was a Christianized version of the life of Gautama Buddha (with "Bodhisattva" mutating into "Josaphat"). Often, polytheistic cultures "converted" to Christianity simply transferred the worship of individual gods to the ''saints'' that most resembled them (in some cases, the old pagan gods were remade ''into'' saints). The Catholic church in particular got ''a lot'' of mileage out of this and seeing some procession processions for some saint saints in e.g. Latin America, it's not hard at all to imagine what the religious customs prior to Christianity may have looked like.
20th Nov '17 7:44:32 PM Weaselephant
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* If you ask Jews, of course, Christianity ''itself'' is this, with their religion.
** The Jews, in turn, did this with the gods of competing peoples, identifying the other nations' tutelaries with [[{{Demonization}} demons]].
** [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] during the Enlightenment, when Reform Judaism adopted many elements of Christian liturgy in an effort to modernize. Some of those changes, like having the Sabbath on Sunday, didn't wind up sticking.

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* If you ask Jews, of course, Christianity ''itself'' is this, with their religion.
Christianity, itself, was derived originally from Judaism.
** The Jews, in turn, did this with the gods of competing peoples, identifying the other nations' tutelaries with [[{{Demonization}} demons]].
** [[InvertedTrope Inverted]]
Reform Judaism, which was developed mainly during the Enlightenment, when Reform Judaism adopted 19th century, dropped many elements of Christian liturgy the ritual aspects of Jewish worship, adding prayers and sermons in an effort the native language of the country, organs and other aspects that were similar to modernize.the practices of surrounding churches. Some of those changes, like having the Sabbath on Sunday, didn't wind up sticking.
16th Nov '17 4:17:08 PM GeorgeT-SLC
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* Discussed in ''Series/{{Vikings}}''. The christian priest Athelstan is kidnapped from his church in Britain, and forced to live alongside the vikings. Although he stays loyal to his religion, he couldn't help but notice the similarities between the cruxificion of Jesus and the story of Odin hanging from Yggdrassil. He becomes troubled by those notions, and eventually accepts both religions. And even then he stays troubled, because a true christian may not worship any other god.

to:

* Discussed in ''Series/{{Vikings}}''. The christian Christian priest Athelstan is kidnapped from his church in Britain, and forced to live alongside the vikings. Although he stays loyal to his religion, he couldn't help but notice the similarities between the cruxificion of Jesus and the story of Odin hanging from Yggdrassil. He becomes troubled by those notions, and eventually accepts both religions. And even then he stays troubled, because a true christian Christian may not worship any other god.



*** Odin's self-sacrifice to gain knowledge (by hanging himself on the World Tree for nine days) bears a striking resemblance to the Crucifixion. However, there are no reported viking activities in the area of Israel at the time, and all reported versions of that myth are from ''after'' christianity became a thing in Europe, so it may also be a case of the vikings trying to hijak christian stories, instead of the other way. It may also be just a coincidence: deaths by hanging were a common punishment in real life, same as crucifixion, but the part of the god having his side torn by a pike seems too specific and suggests an influence in either way.

to:

*** Odin's self-sacrifice to gain knowledge (by hanging himself on the World Tree for nine days) bears a striking resemblance to the Crucifixion. However, there are no reported viking activities in the area of Israel at the time, and all reported versions of that myth are from ''after'' christianity Christianity became a thing in Europe, so it may also be a case of the vikings trying to hijak christian Christian stories, instead of the other way. It may also be just a coincidence: deaths by hanging were a common punishment in real life, same as crucifixion, but the part of the god having his side torn by a pike seems too specific and suggests an influence in either way.
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