History Main / HighAltitudeInterrogation

24th Jul '16 7:27:14 PM SeanMurrayI
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* ''[[WesternAnimation/DragonsRidersOfBerk Dragons: Race to the Edge]]'': Heather uses this technique on a dragon hunter in "Stryke Out" to try to find out where Hiccup and Toothless are being held. Must be where Astrid learned it (see Animated Film section above).

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* ''[[WesternAnimation/DragonsRidersOfBerk Dragons: Race to the Edge]]'': Heather uses this technique on a dragon hunter in "Stryke Out" to try to find out where Hiccup and Toothless are being held. Must be where Astrid learned it (see Animated Film section above).
24th Jul '16 10:11:05 AM Julia1984
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* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague''

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* ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague''''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague'':


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* ''[[WesternAnimation/DragonsRidersOfBerk Dragons: Race to the Edge]]'': Heather uses this technique on a dragon hunter in "Stryke Out" to try to find out where Hiccup and Toothless are being held. Must be where Astrid learned it (see Animated Film section above).
19th May '16 10:07:33 AM Doug86
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* ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}} occasionally does this.

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* ComicBook/{{Spider-Man}} ComicBook/SpiderMan occasionally does this.
9th May '16 7:31:51 PM eroock
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->''My arm's getting tired.''

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->''My ->''"My arm's getting tired.''"''
20th Mar '16 11:19:35 AM SeanMurrayI
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** He does it to a reporter who calls him a liar in ''Comicbook/SupermanGrounded''. Not to interrogate him, just to terrify him. [[SarcasmMode Superman's just that kind of guy.]]

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** He does it to a reporter who calls him a liar in ''Comicbook/SupermanGrounded''. Not to interrogate him, just to terrify him. [[SarcasmMode Superman's just that kind of guy.]]
20th Mar '16 6:32:32 AM Tron80
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** He does it to a reporter who calls him a liar in ''Superman: Grounded''. Not to interrogate him, just to terrify him. [[SarcasmMode Superman's just that kind of guy.]]

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** He does it to a reporter who calls him a liar in ''Superman: Grounded''.''Comicbook/SupermanGrounded''. Not to interrogate him, just to terrify him. [[SarcasmMode Superman's just that kind of guy.]]
12th Mar '16 9:34:23 AM StarSword
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* A variant in an ''Series/NCISLosAngeles'' episode where Callen drags a second prisoner into interrogation when the first one won't talk, then opens a trap-door in the floor and drops him in the ocean. Prisoner #1 talks very fast. Cut to the next scene when Prisoner #2, who is really a one-shot NCIS agent, is in the boat shed toweling himself off as Callen thanks him for helping out.
9th Mar '16 9:35:13 PM SeanMurrayI
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In RealLife, however, this is perhaps the '''''single''' worst interrogation technique'' imaginable, taking the JackBauerInterrogationTechnique to new [[{{Pun}} heights]] of unreliability. Anyone with any bit of common sense should realize that an interrogator would need to keep his man alive if he's ever going to get some answers, but because this method relies on threatening to kill the person with the needed information, the interrogator is put in a position where he has to either (1) not do it and lose all credibility and control of the situation, or (2) let his lead fall to his death and lose the information he would have had. [[CantKillYouStillNeedYou Dead men tell no tales]], after all. Furthermore, any death threats may give a potential informant the impression that his interrogator may just [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kill him after he shares the information that is asked of him]], anyway, which doesn't give the potential informant any incentive to cooperate. (One attempt to get round all this is for the interrogator to suggest that of course they can't ''intentionally'' drop their victim, but the more time that gets wasted, the more likely it is that they'll just lose their grip.)

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In RealLife, however, this is perhaps the '''''single''' worst interrogation technique'' imaginable, taking the JackBauerInterrogationTechnique to new [[{{Pun}} heights]] of unreliability. Anyone with any bit of common sense should realize that an interrogator would need to keep his man alive if he's ever going to get some answers, but because this method relies on threatening to kill the person with the needed information, the interrogator is put in a position where he has to either (1) not do it and lose all credibility and control of the situation, or (2) let his lead fall to his death and lose the information he would have had. [[CantKillYouStillNeedYou Dead men tell no tales]], after all. Furthermore, any death threats may give a potential informant the impression that his interrogator may just [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kill him after he shares the information that is asked of him]], anyway, which doesn't give the potential informant any incentive to cooperate. (One attempt to get round all this is for the interrogator to suggest that of course they can't ''intentionally'' drop their victim, but the more time that gets wasted, the more likely it is that they'll just lose their grip.)
cooperate.
7th Mar '16 12:57:50 PM foxley
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* In ''The Green Eagle'', Franchise/DocSavage captures a group of mooks. To make one talk he hangs him outside a window. When the mook refuses, he drops him. Being a TechnicalPacifist, he had Renny and Longjohn catch the mook in a net, but the other mooks don't know that.

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* In ''The Green Eagle'', Franchise/DocSavage captures a group of mooks. To make one talk he hangs him outside a window. When the mook refuses, he drops him. Being a TechnicalPacifist, he had Renny and Longjohn Long Tom catch the mook in a net, but the other mooks don't know that.
30th Jan '16 8:41:11 PM Angeldeb82
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In fiction, just about everyone is [[PrimalFear afraid of heights]] so when the hardass cop or [[AntiHero anti-hero]] finally corners one of the {{Big Bad}}'s friends from his FiveBadBand who refuses to spill the beans about his boss's EvilPlan on a very high balcony, at the top of a cliff, [[RuleOfThree in a helicopter]], or anywhere else that's high off the ground, that hapless [[{{Mooks}} mook]] is guaranteed to be dangled over the edge by our protagonist in an attempt to loosen his lips. With his life ''literally'' hanging in the balance, the mook finds himself in a position where he is forced to tell the badass hero whatever he wants to know or be dropped to his death.

In RealLife, however, this is perhaps the '''''single''' worst interrogation technique'' imaginable, taking the JackBauerInterrogationTechnique to new [[IncrediblyLamePun heights]] of unreliability. Anyone with any bit of common sense should realize that an interrogator would need to keep his man alive if he's ever going to get some answers, but because this method relies on threatening to kill the person with the needed information, the interrogator is put in a position where he has to either (1) not do it and lose all credibility and control of the situation, or (2) let his lead fall to his death and lose the information he would have had. [[CantKillYouStillNeedYou Dead men tell no tales]], after all. Furthermore, any death threats may give a potential informant the impression that his interrogator may just [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kill him after he shares the information that is asked of him]], anyway, which doesn't give the potential informant any incentive to cooperate. (One attempt to get round all this is for the interrogator to suggest that of course they can't ''intentionally'' drop their victim, but the more time that gets wasted, the more likely it is that they'll just lose their grip.)

Regardless, this technique has an extraordinarily high success rate in all fictional formats. The [[{{Mooks}} mook]] will almost always be willing to comply and do whatever the hero asks, and the hero will always gain enough new information to move the story forward. Uncommon cases where someone is dropped from a height that wouldn't prove fatal but would still be pretty harmful would qualify as JackBauerInterrogationTechnique.

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In fiction, just about everyone is [[PrimalFear afraid of heights]] so when the hardass cop or [[AntiHero anti-hero]] AntiHero finally corners one of the {{Big Bad}}'s BigBad's friends from his FiveBadBand who refuses to spill the beans about his boss's EvilPlan on a very high balcony, at the top of a cliff, [[RuleOfThree in a helicopter]], or anywhere else that's high off the ground, that hapless [[{{Mooks}} mook]] {{mook|s}} is guaranteed to be dangled over the edge by our protagonist in an attempt to loosen his lips. With his life ''literally'' hanging in the balance, the mook finds himself in a position where he is forced to tell the badass hero whatever he wants to know or be dropped to his death.

In RealLife, however, this is perhaps the '''''single''' worst interrogation technique'' imaginable, taking the JackBauerInterrogationTechnique to new [[IncrediblyLamePun [[{{Pun}} heights]] of unreliability. Anyone with any bit of common sense should realize that an interrogator would need to keep his man alive if he's ever going to get some answers, but because this method relies on threatening to kill the person with the needed information, the interrogator is put in a position where he has to either (1) not do it and lose all credibility and control of the situation, or (2) let his lead fall to his death and lose the information he would have had. [[CantKillYouStillNeedYou Dead men tell no tales]], after all. Furthermore, any death threats may give a potential informant the impression that his interrogator may just [[YouHaveOutlivedYourUsefulness kill him after he shares the information that is asked of him]], anyway, which doesn't give the potential informant any incentive to cooperate. (One attempt to get round all this is for the interrogator to suggest that of course they can't ''intentionally'' drop their victim, but the more time that gets wasted, the more likely it is that they'll just lose their grip.)

Regardless, this technique has an extraordinarily high success rate in all fictional formats. The [[{{Mooks}} mook]] {{mook|s}} will almost always be willing to comply and do whatever the hero asks, and the hero will always gain enough new information to move the story forward. Uncommon cases where someone is dropped from a height that wouldn't prove fatal but would still be pretty harmful would qualify as JackBauerInterrogationTechnique.



* TheFlash once did this to a mook. The mook taunted that Flash was trying to copy Batman, but Flash drops him, uses his superspeed to catch him, and then continues dangling him.

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* TheFlash ComicBook/TheFlash once did this to a mook. The mook taunted that Flash was trying to copy Batman, but Flash drops him, uses his superspeed to catch him, and then continues dangling him.



* In ''Comicbook/{{Lucifer}}'', the title character [[InvertedTrope inverts]] this with Mahu. Since a fall won't kill Mahu, Lucifer threatens to throw him into orbit, from which re-entry ''will'' kill him .. eventually.

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* In ''Comicbook/{{Lucifer}}'', the title character [[InvertedTrope inverts]] {{invert|edTrope}}s this with Mahu. Since a fall won't kill Mahu, Lucifer threatens to throw him into orbit, from which re-entry ''will'' kill him .. eventually.



* In ''[[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins Origins]]'', a ''MassEffect''[=/=]''StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] MassiveMultiplayerCrossover, Sarah attempts this, but the person [[TortureIsIneffective refuses to talk]] and is dropped at least two hundred meters.

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* In ''[[FanFic/SovereignGFCOrigins Origins]]'', a ''MassEffect''[=/=]''StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] ''MassEffect''[=/=]''Franchise/StarWars''[[spoiler:[=/=]''[=Borderlands=]''[=/=]''[=Halo=]'']] MassiveMultiplayerCrossover, Sarah attempts this, but the person [[TortureIsIneffective refuses to talk]] and is dropped at least two hundred meters.



* ''Film/{{Commando}}'': John Matrix (Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger) dangles one of the kidnappers of his daughter above a cliff to make him talk. This one is actually a lot more cold-blooded: while Sully made it perfectly clear that he would be willing to talk, Matrix had already found the necessary PlotCoupon in his coat pocket before holding him over the cliff's edge. He just brought him there solely to [[PostMortemOneLiner let him go]].

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* ''Film/{{Commando}}'': John Matrix (Creator/ArnoldSchwarzenegger) dangles one of the kidnappers of his daughter above a cliff to make him talk. This one is actually a lot more cold-blooded: while Sully made it perfectly clear that he would be willing to talk, Matrix had already found the necessary PlotCoupon in his coat pocket before holding him over the cliff's edge. He just brought him there solely to [[PostMortemOneLiner [[BondOneLiner let him go]].



'''Sully:''' That's right Matrix! You did!\\
'''Matrix:''' {{I lied}}. ''(drops Sully)''

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'''Sully:''' That's right right, Matrix! You did!\\
'''Matrix:''' {{I lied}}.ILied. ''(drops Sully)''



** [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] and [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] in ''Film/TheDarkKnight''; Maroni casually tells Batman that a fall wouldn't kill him, so Batman drops him and breaks his legs, making it JackBauerInterrogationTechnique. And Maroni doesn't tell him anything ''anyway,'' because [[TheMobBossISScarier he's not going to rat out The Joker for anyone]], least of all Batman. "We're on to you," he says. "You've got rules. The Joker ''has'' no rules."

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** [[SubvertedTrope Subverted]] {{Subverted|Trope}} and [[LampshadeHanging Lampshaded]] {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in ''Film/TheDarkKnight''; Maroni casually tells Batman that a fall wouldn't kill him, so Batman drops him and breaks his legs, making it JackBauerInterrogationTechnique. And Maroni doesn't tell him anything ''anyway,'' because [[TheMobBossISScarier he's not going to rat out The Joker for anyone]], least of all Batman. "We're on to you," he says. "You've got rules. The Joker ''has'' no rules."



'''[[spoiler: Bane]]:''' Or perhaps he's wondering [[GenreSavvy why someone would shoot a man]] [[LampshadeHanging before throwing him out of a plane.]]

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'''[[spoiler: Bane]]:''' Or perhaps he's wondering [[GenreSavvy why someone would shoot a man]] [[LampshadeHanging before throwing him out of a plane.]]plane]].



* Subverted in ''Film/TangoAndCash'': the protagonists try this on a Mook. It doesn't work. Then Tango attaches a grenade to his head and starts to take the pin away slowly with [[GoodCopBadCop Cash trying to dissuade him]]. [[spoiler:It works. [[FalseRoulette The grenade turns out to be fake]].]]

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* Subverted in ''Film/TangoAndCash'': the protagonists try this on a Mook. It doesn't work. Then Tango attaches a grenade to his head and starts to take the pin away slowly with [[GoodCopBadCop Cash trying to dissuade him]]. [[spoiler:It works. [[FalseRoulette The grenade turns out to be fake]].]]fake.]]]]



** Paul Vitti and Jelly hangs down a hitman who tried to kill them to make him say who sent him. Then Jelly lets him go from misunderstanding his boss, although the mobster falls into trash bags and survives [[spoiler:(well, not for long).]]

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** Paul Vitti and Jelly hangs down a hitman who tried to kill them to make him say who sent him. Then Jelly lets him go from misunderstanding his boss, although the mobster falls into trash bags and survives [[spoiler:(well, not for long).]]long)]].



* In one episode of ''Series/TheCape'', Vince dangles a corrupt cop by dangling him over a bridge with his cape. [[SubvertedTrope It doesn't work]].

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* In one episode of ''Series/TheCape'', Vince dangles a corrupt cop by dangling him over a bridge with his cape. [[SubvertedTrope It doesn't work]].work.]]



* The reimagined ''Series/HawaiiFive0'' has [=McGarret=] doing this to a Serbian Mafia criminal involved in a kidnaping from the roof of a grand hotel. Danno then [[WhatTheHellHero chew him out about the rights of the suspects]].

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* The reimagined ''Series/HawaiiFive0'' has [=McGarret=] doing this to a Serbian Mafia criminal involved in a kidnaping kidnapping from the roof of a grand hotel. Danno then [[WhatTheHellHero chew him out about the rights of the suspects]].



** The Hugo Strange promotional trailer shows Batman interrogating a {{Mook}} in such a manner as this, with Batman demanding to know who sent him and the mook promptly answering, "Hugo Strange."

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** The Hugo Strange promotional trailer shows Batman interrogating a {{Mook}} {{Mook|s}} in such a manner as this, with Batman demanding to know who sent him and the mook promptly answering, "Hugo Strange."



* In one quest line in ''VideoGame/{{World of Warcraft}}'''s ''Cataclysm'' expansion, a Twilight's Hammer higher-up is interrogated this way, with the added feature that he'll suffer [[TurbineBlender Propeller Blender]] if dropped. At the close, the shaman doing the interrogation reveals that she had several air elementals ready to catch him if he ''did'' come loose, so the problem of losing the information with his life was never actually there.

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* In one quest line in ''VideoGame/{{World of Warcraft}}'''s ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft''[='=]s ''Cataclysm'' expansion, a Twilight's Hammer higher-up is interrogated this way, with the added feature that he'll suffer [[TurbineBlender Propeller Blender]] if dropped. At the close, the shaman doing the interrogation reveals that she had several air elementals ready to catch him if he ''did'' come loose, so the problem of losing the information with his life was never actually there.



* In ''[[WesternAnimation/TheSpectacularSpiderMan The Spectacular Spider-Man]]'' episode "Shear Strength," Gwen is being held hostage by The Master Planner, and Spidey attempts to get information out of the captured Tinkerer by dangling him off a building. Tinkerer unwisely calls his bluff, and Spidey really ''does'' drop him, only to save him with a webline at the last minute so he'll talk. The best part is Spidey realistically points out that his reflexes might not be enough to pull that trick off a second time.
* One ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' sketch revolving around Ted Turner becoming CaptainPlanet sees him smash through the window of a corporate office while two [[CorruptCorporateExecutive executives]] are contemplating dumping polluted waste in the Grand Canyon. Turner then proceeds to hold one of the two men out the window until he agrees to sign a clause agreeing to not dump waste in the Grand Canyon, at which point Ted Turner would agree to [[UnhandThemVillain let the guy go]].

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* In ''[[WesternAnimation/TheSpectacularSpiderMan The Spectacular Spider-Man]]'' ''WesternAnimation/TheSpectacularSpiderMan'' episode "Shear Strength," Gwen is being held hostage by The Master Planner, and Spidey attempts to get information out of the captured Tinkerer by dangling him off a building. Tinkerer unwisely calls his bluff, and Spidey really ''does'' drop him, only to save him with a webline at the last minute so he'll talk. The best part is Spidey realistically points out that his reflexes might not be enough to pull that trick off a second time.
* One ''WesternAnimation/RobotChicken'' sketch revolving around Ted Turner becoming CaptainPlanet WesternAnimation/{{Captain Planet|AndThePlaneteers}} sees him smash through the window of a corporate office while two [[CorruptCorporateExecutive executives]] are contemplating dumping polluted waste in the Grand Canyon. Turner then proceeds to hold one of the two men out the window until he agrees to sign a clause agreeing to not dump waste in the Grand Canyon, at which point Ted Turner would agree to [[UnhandThemVillain let the guy go]].
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