History Main / HeroicFantasy

17th Mar '17 9:47:59 AM Inferus54
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* ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'' and the ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' series.

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* ''VideoGame/DemonsSouls'' and the The ''VideoGame/DarkSouls'' series.


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* The ''VideoGame/{{Fable}}'' series.
18th Feb '17 9:44:16 AM Aggron9988
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* ''Webcomic/ChampionsOfFaraus''.
15th Feb '17 12:17:55 AM MeepieV
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* Many of the older ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.

to:

* Many of the older ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its it's Vimesy, the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's if it's the witches then it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided ]] as to whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) elaborate/longer) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.
15th Feb '17 12:15:06 AM MeepieV
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* Many of the older ''Literature/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.

to:

* Many of the older ''Literature/Discworld'' ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.



* As a lot of film critics have noted, ''WesternAnimation/Shrek'' and its original sequel might have been written as self-conscious [[AffectionateParody affectionate parodies]] of "fairy tale movies" but both movies use and celebrate heroic fantasy tropes so whole-heartedly that they both feel more like straight "fairy tale movies"/ heroic fantasy with lots of humour and character development.

to:

* As a lot of film critics have noted, ''WesternAnimation/Shrek'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' and its original sequel might have been written as self-conscious [[AffectionateParody affectionate parodies]] of "fairy tale movies" but both movies use and celebrate heroic fantasy tropes so whole-heartedly that they both feel more like straight "fairy tale movies"/ heroic fantasy with lots of humour and character development.
15th Feb '17 12:10:29 AM MeepieV
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* ''Film/ThePrincessBride'' is an [[AffectionateParody affectionate and very gentle parody]] of this genre. The novel it was based on was darker and more of a deconstruction. Just like with ''WesternAnimation/Shrek'', the heroes' goals are taken just (or almost) as seriously as they would be in a straight heroic fantasy.

to:

* ''Film/ThePrincessBride'' is an [[AffectionateParody affectionate and very gentle parody]] of this genre. The novel it was based on was darker and more of a deconstruction. Just like with ''WesternAnimation/Shrek'', ''Film/Shrek'', the heroes' goals are taken just (or almost) as seriously as they would be in a straight heroic fantasy.



* Many of the older ''Franchise/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.

to:

* Many of the older ''Franchise/Discworld'' ''Literature/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.
15th Feb '17 12:07:00 AM MeepieV
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* Many of the older ''Franchise/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, members of the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then its probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more as the series progressed. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.
** Back in the day, there were a [[FollowTheLeader number of less popular and deservedly-forgotten fantasy/comedy novels attempting to capitalise on the popularity of Discworld, which were almost always set in heroic or high fantasy universes]]. They tended to be quite a bit bleaker, because they had as much [[DarkerAndEdgier and sometimes more]] violence as the Discworld novels did, but less well developed and likeable characters.

to:

* Many of the older ''Franchise/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, members of the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the elderly barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then its it's probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more as the series progressed.more. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.
** Back in the day, there were a [[FollowTheLeader number of less popular and deservedly-forgotten fantasy/comedy novels attempting to capitalise on the popularity of Discworld, which were almost always set in heroic or high fantasy universes]]. They tended to be quite a bit bleaker, very bleak, because they had as much the same [[DarkerAndEdgier and sometimes more]] an even more exaggerated]] casual approach to violence as that you'd see in the earlier Discworld novels did, novels, but less well developed not the goofy and likeable characters.supporting cast of recurring characters which stopped Discworld from ever becoming particularly dark.
14th Feb '17 11:57:31 PM MeepieV
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* Many of the older ''Literature/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, members of the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, and it if's the witches then its probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy.

to:

* Many of the older ''Literature/Discworld'' ''Franchise/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions deconstructions/parodies of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, members of the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, the barbarians are usually heroic fantasy, and it if's the witches then its probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy. Pratchett seems to have started out creating straight parodies of heroic and high fantasy, and then gotten bored halfway through and slowly began integrating and exploring low fantasy settings more and more as the series progressed. [[BrokenBase Fans are divided as whether the earlier (and punchier) heroic fantasy parodies are better or worse than the later ( and more thoughtful and elaborate) low-fantasy-with-an-emphasis-on-social-themes-and-character-based-comedies.
** Back in the day, there were a [[FollowTheLeader number of less popular and deservedly-forgotten fantasy/comedy novels attempting to capitalise on the popularity of Discworld, which were almost always set in heroic or high fantasy universes]]. They tended to be quite a bit bleaker, because they had as much [[DarkerAndEdgier and sometimes more]] violence as the Discworld novels did, but less well developed and likeable characters.
14th Feb '17 11:35:54 PM MeepieV
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* Many of the older ''Literature/Discworld'' novels were comedic deconstructions of this genre, as are a few of the more recent ones. A very loose rule of thumb for the Discworld books: If the main character is Rincewind or Susan, it's probably going to be heroic or high fantasy; if its Vimesy, members of the Watch, Moist, or Death, you are probably looking at low fantasy, and it if's the witches then its probably either going to be low or heroic fantasy.



* George R. R. Martin's ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' is a brutal reconstruction of this genre. Knights are mostly just brutal thugs with established family lineages; rulers gain their power through a combination of the sort of underhanded political strategies you'd expect a crime boss to use and winning wars ( that in no way prepare them for ruling during peace times); earning political positions through birthright is a disastrous idea even before you factor in the inbreeding; traumatic experiences are legitimately traumatising; and basing your strategy on any type of morality and high ideals will get you and lots of innocent people (including those you love) killed. Strangely, though,the high fantasy tropes are played almost completely straight in relation to Bran Stark's storyline (particularly since his escape from Winterfell).



* Just like its source material, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' is a brutal deconstruction of this genre but the Bran Stark (and some sections of the Arya Stark) storyline skirts perilously close to straight heroic fantasy (although it has been becoming closer to high fantasy as of the seventh series ). Bran's storyline is much more well-liked by younger fans who have been [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids watching the show since they were children]] than by adult viewers, who dislike the perceived lack of tension.
14th Feb '17 11:14:07 PM MeepieV
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* ''Film/ThePrincessBride'' is an [[AffectionateParody affectionate and very gentle parody]] of this genre. The novel it was based on was darker and more of a deconstruction.

to:

* ''Film/ThePrincessBride'' is an [[AffectionateParody affectionate and very gentle parody]] of this genre. The novel it was based on was darker and more of a deconstruction. Just like with ''WesternAnimation/Shrek'', the heroes' goals are taken just (or almost) as seriously as they would be in a straight heroic fantasy.



* Just like its source material, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' is a brutal deconstruction of this genre but the Bran Stark (and some sections of the Arya Stark) storyline skirts perilously close to straight heroic fantasy. Bran's storyline is much more well-liked by younger fans who have been [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids watching the show since they were children]] than by adult viewers, who dislike the perceived lack of tension.

to:

* Just like its source material, ''Series/GameOfThrones'' is a brutal deconstruction of this genre but the Bran Stark (and some sections of the Arya Stark) storyline skirts perilously close to straight heroic fantasy.fantasy (although it has been becoming closer to high fantasy as of the seventh series ). Bran's storyline is much more well-liked by younger fans who have been [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids watching the show since they were children]] than by adult viewers, who dislike the perceived lack of tension.
14th Feb '17 11:05:02 PM MeepieV
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Added DiffLines:

* As a lot of film critics have noted, ''WesternAnimation/Shrek'' and its original sequel might have been written as self-conscious [[AffectionateParody affectionate parodies]] of "fairy tale movies" but both movies use and celebrate heroic fantasy tropes so whole-heartedly that they both feel more like straight "fairy tale movies"/ heroic fantasy with lots of humour and character development.
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