History Main / HeroInsurance

25th Jun '16 7:59:48 PM Fireblood
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--->'''Q:''' Will you need collision insurance?\\

to:

--->'''Q:''' Will you need collision insurance?\\coverage?\\



'''Q:''' Property Damage?\\

to:

'''Q:''' Property Damage?\\destruction?\\



'''Q:''' Personal Injury?\\

to:

'''Q:''' Personal Injury?\\injury?\\



'''Q:''' They often do with you.
** This one is justifiable by context, as throughout the scene, Q is disguised as an Avis rental agent, going through the pretence of filling in the necessary paperwork involved in any car rental agreement. They are MI6 agents, after all.
** Bond seems to have it in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough'', but his allies in the Russian underworld do not, even if he is involved. After Zukovsky's caviar factory is demolished by Elektra King's henchmen (who were trying to kill Bond), Zukovsky shouts, "The insurance company is never going to believe this!"
* ''Lethal Weapon''

to:

'''Q:''' They often frequently do with you.
** This one is justifiable by context, as throughout the scene, Q is disguised as an Avis rental agent, going through the pretence pretense of filling in the necessary paperwork involved in any car rental agreement. They are MI6 agents, after all.
** Bond seems to have it in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough'', but his allies in the Russian underworld do not, even if he is involved. After Zukovsky's caviar factory is demolished by Elektra King's henchmen (who were trying to kill Bond), Zukovsky shouts, shouts "The insurance company is never going to believe this!"
* ''Lethal Weapon''Weapon'':



** In ''Film/LethalWeapon4'', Riggs and Murtaugh are promoted and given desk jobs because the city lost its insurance. [[spoiler: It didn't help they caused even more damage.]]

to:

** In ''Film/LethalWeapon4'', Riggs and Murtaugh are promoted and given desk jobs because the city lost its insurance. [[spoiler: It didn't help they help-they caused even more damage.]]
24th Jun '16 6:02:31 AM Doug86
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* In ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} #12 new hero Terra (now called Atlee) helps Supergirl take out a giant dinosaur; after the battle she uses her earth powers to repair the streets and even fix a fire hydrant. It is later revealed in the Terra miniseries that she apparently does this after every battle.
* Subverted in a barfight between Colossus of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} and the Juggernaut, where Cain actually pays for damages afterwards.

to:

* In ComicBook/{{Supergirl}} ''ComicBook/{{Supergirl}}'' #12 new hero Terra (now called Atlee) helps Supergirl take out a giant dinosaur; after the battle she uses her earth powers to repair the streets and even fix a fire hydrant. It is later revealed in the Terra miniseries that she apparently does this after every battle.
* Subverted in a barfight between Colossus of the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} ComicBook/XMen and the Juggernaut, where Cain actually pays for damages afterwards.
24th Jun '16 3:09:06 AM Morgenthaler
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* While ''HongKongPhooey'' isn't so destructive given he doesn't have superpowers, he's so popular everyone who directly suffers from a fair share of his destruction is ''pleased'' for this.

to:

* While ''HongKongPhooey'' ''WesternAnimation/HongKongPhooey'' isn't so destructive given he doesn't have superpowers, he's so popular everyone who directly suffers from a fair share of his destruction is ''pleased'' for this.
22nd Jun '16 2:08:45 PM Willbyr
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* In ''ZettaiKarenChildren'' Kaoru, a special ESPer working for a government agency, is requested a help from a FriendlyEnemy WellIntentionedExtremist organization to help them in a particular task. When they damage a passenger plane to drive one of their evil enemies out of it, Kaoru freaks out for them being so reckless and for gambling with the passengers' lives. When they point out to her that she does the same thing regularly when going on missions, she replies that in that case she is backed up by the said government agency which controls and compensates the damage.

to:

* In ''ZettaiKarenChildren'' ''Manga/ZettaiKarenChildren'' Kaoru, a special ESPer working for a government agency, is requested a help from a FriendlyEnemy WellIntentionedExtremist organization to help them in a particular task. When they damage a passenger plane to drive one of their evil enemies out of it, Kaoru freaks out for them being so reckless and for gambling with the passengers' lives. When they point out to her that she does the same thing regularly when going on missions, she replies that in that case she is backed up by the said government agency which controls and compensates the damage.
21st Jun '16 1:43:07 PM Willbyr
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* [[ExaggeratedTrope Exaggerated]] in ''LightNovel/DirtyPair''. The Lovely Angels' recklessness in their cases mingles with FinaglesLaw to frequently cause the destruction of cities, if not entire planets; nevertheless, the Central Computer of their employer infallibly clears them of blame every time. Which isn't enough to keep them from being hated and feared by most of humanity.

to:

* [[ExaggeratedTrope Exaggerated]] {{Exaggerated|Trope}} in ''LightNovel/DirtyPair''. The Lovely Angels' recklessness in their cases mingles with FinaglesLaw to frequently cause the destruction of cities, if not entire planets; nevertheless, the Central Computer of their employer infallibly clears them of blame every time. Which isn't enough to keep them from being hated and feared by most of humanity.



* Aversion: As a result of the numerous destructive car chases in ''GunsmithCats'', Rally "The Wrecker" has been blacklisted by every auto insurance company in Illinois.

to:

* Aversion: As a result of the numerous destructive car chases in ''GunsmithCats'', ''Manga/GunsmithCats'', Rally "The Wrecker" has been blacklisted by every auto insurance company in Illinois.



* Averted in ''TigerAndBunny''. Damages incurred by a superhero must be paid for either by his/her sponsor company or the hero him/herself. In the very first episode [[DestructiveSaviour Kotetsu]], the protagonist, is berated for damaging a monorail track in order to stop a hijacker. And in episode 5 he is brought before a judge who rules that his company be fined for the property that was destroyed during one of his rescue attempts in episode 4. To be precise, the city pays for any damage deemed necessary for the hero to capture a criminal and/or protect civilians. However, anything the city deems unnecessary is billed to the hero's sponsor company. So a hero who pulls a chunk out of the road in order to stop a bystander being shot would not be charged, but a hero who stomps a car's roof in when he could have just run around it would be charged. All of the heroes in the show are employees or owners of companies which use the hero's "brand" to generate money, so that they don't personally have to pay these charges (and also to generate a living wage for them, as they aren't directly paid to be heroes). One of the reasons co-protagonist Wild Tiger is nicknamed the "Crusher for Justice" is due to his habit of smashing things up with his super strength and earning himself a constant stream of large bills for his sponsor company to pay. The show actually begins with [[spoiler:his original sponsor company going out of business due to the large bills he receives. The only reason he agrees to be in a partnership with Barnaby is because the next company to hire him tells him to do it or quit, and implies that no other sponsor company would agree to take on a hero who's fame (and ability to generate money) is waning but continues to rack up such large bills.]]

to:

* Averted in ''TigerAndBunny''.''Anime/TigerAndBunny''. Damages incurred by a superhero must be paid for either by his/her sponsor company or the hero him/herself. In the very first episode [[DestructiveSaviour Kotetsu]], the protagonist, is berated for damaging a monorail track in order to stop a hijacker. And in episode 5 he is brought before a judge who rules that his company be fined for the property that was destroyed during one of his rescue attempts in episode 4. To be precise, the city pays for any damage deemed necessary for the hero to capture a criminal and/or protect civilians. However, anything the city deems unnecessary is billed to the hero's sponsor company. So a hero who pulls a chunk out of the road in order to stop a bystander being shot would not be charged, but a hero who stomps a car's roof in when he could have just run around it would be charged. All of the heroes in the show are employees or owners of companies which use the hero's "brand" to generate money, so that they don't personally have to pay these charges (and also to generate a living wage for them, as they aren't directly paid to be heroes). One of the reasons co-protagonist Wild Tiger is nicknamed the "Crusher for Justice" is due to his habit of smashing things up with his super strength and earning himself a constant stream of large bills for his sponsor company to pay. The show actually begins with [[spoiler:his original sponsor company going out of business due to the large bills he receives. The only reason he agrees to be in a partnership with Barnaby is because the next company to hire him tells him to do it or quit, and implies that no other sponsor company would agree to take on a hero who's fame (and ability to generate money) is waning but continues to rack up such large bills.]]
19th Jun '16 8:24:55 PM nombretomado
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* The first incarnation of Marvel's ''{{Thunderbolts}}'' finished winning the hearts of [[BigApplesauce New York City]] in their first issue by staying behind to repair the damage to [[MonumentalBattle the Statue of Liberty]] caused in one of their battles. It was specifically mentioned that everyone was so happy to see a new team of heroes, that the metalworkers unions weren't going to sue their pants off for doing union work. Citizen V even alludes to the fact that superheroes cleaning up after themselves is usually ''not'' appreciated by those who would otherwise be paid to do it. Definitely a bit of lampshading for this trope.

to:

* The first incarnation of Marvel's ''{{Thunderbolts}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Thunderbolts}}'' finished winning the hearts of [[BigApplesauce New York City]] in their first issue by staying behind to repair the damage to [[MonumentalBattle the Statue of Liberty]] caused in one of their battles. It was specifically mentioned that everyone was so happy to see a new team of heroes, that the metalworkers unions weren't going to sue their pants off for doing union work. Citizen V even alludes to the fact that superheroes cleaning up after themselves is usually ''not'' appreciated by those who would otherwise be paid to do it. Definitely a bit of lampshading for this trope.
14th Jun '16 7:42:34 AM dmcreif
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'''Bond:''' I hope not, but accidents do happen.
** However, it is justifiable by context, in that Q is posing in that scene as an Avis rental agent, going through the pretence of filling in the necessary paperwork involved in any car rental agreement. They are secret agents, after all.
** He seems to have it in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough'', but his allies in the Russian underworld do not, even if he is involved. After Zukovsky's caviar factory is demolished by Elektra King's henchman (who were trying to kill Bond), Zukovsky shouts, "The insurance company is never going to believe this!"

to:

'''Bond:''' I hope not, but accidents do happen.
** However, it
happen.\\
'''Q:''' They often do with you.
**This one
is justifiable by context, in that as throughout the scene, Q is posing in that scene disguised as an Avis rental agent, going through the pretence of filling in the necessary paperwork involved in any car rental agreement. They are secret MI6 agents, after all.
** He Bond seems to have it in ''Film/TheWorldIsNotEnough'', but his allies in the Russian underworld do not, even if he is involved. After Zukovsky's caviar factory is demolished by Elektra King's henchman henchmen (who were trying to kill Bond), Zukovsky shouts, "The insurance company is never going to believe this!"
13th Jun '16 5:21:23 PM Rupa
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Added DiffLines:

* [[DiscussedTrope Discussed]] in [[http://english.bouletcorp.com/2010/02/26/superday/ this comic]] from ''Webcomic/BouletCorp''.
--> AltText: "If superpowers were real, you would probably be some dumbass watching them do the amazing stuff, waiting to be killed by some supervillain, or even worse: you'd be a collateral dammage in their fights and noone would notice you."
3rd Jun '16 1:13:49 PM Discar
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* Averted in OnePiece. The heroes are pirates to begin with, so if they destroy buildings the Navy will respond to it. Normally, the Straw Hat Crew is able to survive their encounters with the Navy. However, if they do commit a serious crime their bounties could increase.

to:

* Averted in OnePiece.''Manga/OnePiece'':
** Averted.
The heroes are pirates to begin with, so if they destroy buildings the Navy will respond to it. Normally, the Straw Hat Crew is able to survive their encounters with the Navy. However, if they do commit a serious crime their bounties could increase.



* The titular robot from ''Anime/TheBigO'', a HumongousMecha whose pilot is sometimes guilty of causing just as much damage, if not more, while fighting the MonsterOfTheWeek than the monster could cause all by itself. Sometimes entire blocks are razed, but the massive destruction is never really brought up. It's lessened a little by the fact that Paradigm City is fairly underpopulated -- a lot of the buildings are entirely deserted, or ruined anyway.
** It's not just fighting monsters either. The act of just ''deploying'' Big O and returning it to it's "hangar" causes ''huge thousand-feet-deep craters'' to be dug all over the place, and nobody seems to care.

to:

* ''Anime/TheBigO'':
**
The titular robot from ''Anime/TheBigO'', robot, a HumongousMecha whose pilot is sometimes guilty of causing just as much damage, if not more, while fighting the MonsterOfTheWeek than the monster could cause all by itself. Sometimes entire blocks are razed, but the massive destruction is never really brought up. It's lessened a little by the fact that Paradigm City is fairly underpopulated -- a lot of the buildings are entirely deserted, or ruined anyway.
** It's not just fighting monsters either. The act of just ''deploying'' Big O and returning it to it's its "hangar" causes ''huge thousand-feet-deep craters'' to be dug all over the place, and nobody seems to care.



* Vash The Humanoid Typhoon from ''Manga/{{Trigun}}''. However, it's not without its Lampshade Hangings. Two of the characters are insurance society representatives who stick around to keep an eye on him and fail miserably at keeping him out of trouble, and in the fifth episode of the anime, a character mentions that "Class G Property Damage" contributed to Vash's enormous bounty.
** In the end, the Bernardelli Insurance Company just washes its hands of Vash, and declares any and all damage caused by him "Acts of God."
*** Justified, since he accidentally [[spoiler: blew a chunk out of one of the moons; at that point, you can't really call him anything else]].

to:

* ''Manga/{{Trigun}}'':
**
Vash The Humanoid Typhoon from ''Manga/{{Trigun}}''.Typhoon. However, it's not without its Lampshade Hangings. Two of the characters are insurance society representatives who stick around to keep an eye on him and fail miserably at keeping him out of trouble, and in the fifth episode of the anime, a character mentions that "Class G Property Damage" contributed to Vash's enormous bounty.
** In the end, the Bernardelli Insurance Company just washes its hands of Vash, and declares any and all damage caused by him "Acts of God."
***
" Justified, since he accidentally [[spoiler: blew a chunk out of one of the moons; at that point, you can't really call him anything else]].



* Usually averted in ''Manga/DragonBall''. Particularly in the movies. While battles usually take place in remote areas by default, Goku has often made a point of taking a fight outside of the city to prevent this kind of thing.

to:

* ''Manga/DragonBall'':
**
Usually averted in ''Manga/DragonBall''.averted. Particularly in the movies. While battles usually take place in remote areas by default, Goku has often made a point of taking a fight outside of the city to prevent this kind of thing.



--->'''Goku:''' How could you do this?! Leave these people out of it!
--->'''Android 19:''' [[ActuallyPrettyFunny There are no people left to leave out]].

to:

--->'''Goku:''' How could you do this?! Leave these people out of it!
--->'''Android
it!\\
'''Android
19:''' [[ActuallyPrettyFunny There are no people left to leave out]].



* Averted in the [[DeconstructedTrope most mean-spirited manner]] in ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'': After learning that their ''first'' giant robot battle has ''killed two thousand people and levelled a mountain'', several of the children get notably upset by it and want to break the {{masquerade}} and tell people about it.

to:

* ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'':
**
Averted in the [[DeconstructedTrope most mean-spirited manner]] in ''Manga/{{Bokurano}}'': manner]]. After learning that their ''first'' giant robot battle has ''killed two thousand people and levelled leveled a mountain'', several of the children get notably upset by it and want to break the {{masquerade}} and tell people about it.



* Averted in ''Anime/GaoGaiGar''; the villains realize early on the potential of handicapping the heroes by bringing fights to populated areas. The heroes respond by inventing a device to [[PhantomZone create a pocket dimension]] in which to fight the villains.
** That said, if the story of the episode needed to have more of a rousing conclusion, GGG does have a small army of Tool based robots ready to repair any damage done.
* Subverted in ''New Manga/GetterRobo'', where a big deal is made of the property damage when a battle moves into the city.

to:

* Averted in ''Anime/GaoGaiGar''; the villains realize early on the potential of handicapping the heroes by bringing fights to populated areas. The heroes respond by inventing a device to [[PhantomZone create a pocket dimension]] in which to fight the villains.
**
villains. That said, if the story of the episode needed to have more of a rousing conclusion, GGG does have a small army of Tool based robots ready to repair any damage done.
* Subverted in ''New Manga/GetterRobo'', Manga/GetterRobo'':
** Subverted,
where a big deal is made of the property damage when a battle moves into the city.



** And once more in ''Shin Manga/GetterRobo VS. Neo Manga/GetterRobo'', where the massive amounts of property damage caused by [[TheyKilledKenny Musashi's]] HeroicSacrifice causes the government to abolish Getter Energy research.
*** Though played straight afterwards, as even though Neo Getter run on plasma energy, they still cause property damage while fighting monsters and are never called on it.
* Check the end of the second ''Anime/ProjectAKo'' film. The kind of use would be a spoiler.
** Check the ''beginning'' of any episode. A-Ko causes massive damage just by ''running to school''.

to:

** And once more in ''Shin Manga/GetterRobo VS. Neo Manga/GetterRobo'', where the massive amounts of property damage caused by [[TheyKilledKenny Musashi's]] HeroicSacrifice causes the government to abolish Getter Energy research.
***
research. Though played straight afterwards, as even though Neo Getter run on plasma energy, they still cause property damage while fighting monsters and are never called on it.
* Check the end of the second ''Anime/ProjectAKo'' film. The kind of use would be a spoiler.
**
spoiler. Check the ''beginning'' of any episode. A-Ko causes massive damage just by ''running to school''.



* Averted in ''Manga/{{X|1999}}'', the good guys create a barrier/parallel dimension to protect the battle zones which in this case can't be considered collateral damage, tearing down the buildings is the primary objective of the bad guys. If the good guys die, the area retains the damage from the battle.
** Note that the good guys have an unimpressive track record for "winning". Also, it's not just "death" that dissolves the barrier. Loss of HeroicSpirit, like that endured by [[spoiler: Subaru]] still results in the damage being permanent. Also, in the manga, one holy site gets blown up without the heroes ever showing up.
* Horribly messed up in ''LightNovel/ShakuganNoShana'' battles take place in barriers similar to ''X'' but the writers can't make up their mind about whether time passes normally outside the barrier or not, after the battles end, human lives are consumed to repair the collateral damage.
** Depends on who wins. Bad guys use human lives to repair the damage. Good guys use the bits inside "Torches" (the remnant echos of humans whose existence has been consumed by the bad guys).
* Generally averted in ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'' where the Shinigami have the ability to stand on air, which they generally use to keep their battles high above the cities to lower the collateral damage. In the latest arc they've even gone as far as replacing the town with an exact replica of it so they can have an all out war without worrying about breaking anything.
** They have broken things before, like during Ikkaku's fight with [[spoiler: the arrancar Edorad Leones]]. However it was mentioned that Soul Society fixes everything afterwords, with the costs being taken out of the budget of the squad responsible. (Though that does beg the question on who pays for damages caused by Ichigo's fights...)
* ''MahouSenseiNegima'' does a HandWave saying that the people of the magic world in a city known for its dueling and gladiator fights are used to this sort of thing and have measures in place to deal with it. Apparently up to and including buildings being chopped to pieces. Naturally, this doesn't stop Negi from worrying about it anyway.
** The implication seems to be that the loser(s) of the fight is made to pay for the damages. One has to wonder what happens if the loser ends up dead, if that's the case.

to:

* Averted in ''Manga/{{X|1999}}'', the good guys create a barrier/parallel dimension to protect the battle zones which in this case can't be considered collateral damage, tearing down the buildings is the primary objective of the bad guys. If the good guys die, the area retains the damage from the battle.
**
battle. Note that the good guys have an unimpressive track record for "winning". Also, it's not just "death" that dissolves the barrier. Loss of HeroicSpirit, like that endured by [[spoiler: Subaru]] still results in the damage being permanent. Also, in the manga, one holy site gets blown up without the heroes ever showing up.
* Horribly messed up in ''LightNovel/ShakuganNoShana'' battles take place in barriers similar to ''X'' but the writers can't make up their mind about whether time passes normally outside the barrier or not, after the battles end, human lives are consumed to repair the collateral damage.
**
damage. Depends on who wins. Bad guys use human lives to repair the damage. Good guys use the bits inside "Torches" (the remnant echos of humans whose existence has been consumed by the bad guys).
* Generally averted in ''Manga/{{Bleach}}'' where the Shinigami have the ability to stand on air, which they generally use to keep their battles high above the cities to lower the collateral damage. In the latest arc they've even gone as far as replacing the town with an exact replica of it so they can have an all out war without worrying about breaking anything.
**
anything. They have broken things before, like during Ikkaku's fight with [[spoiler: the arrancar Edorad Leones]]. However it was mentioned that Soul Society fixes everything afterwords, with the costs being taken out of the budget of the squad responsible. (Though that does beg the question on who pays for damages caused by Ichigo's fights...)
* ''MahouSenseiNegima'' does a HandWave saying that the people of the magic world in a city known for its dueling and gladiator fights are used to this sort of thing and have measures in place to deal with it. Apparently up to and including buildings being chopped to pieces. Naturally, this doesn't stop Negi from worrying about it anyway.
**
anyway. The implication seems to be that the loser(s) of the fight is made to pay for the damages. One has to wonder what happens if the loser ends up dead, if that's the case.



* ''{{LightNovel/Slayers}}''. Though, the poor innocent villagers probably ''would'' make Lina pay for the damage... if they could catch her.
** Averted; in fact it's a running gag. She's basically what you get if you turn [[{{Trigun}} Vash the Stampede]] into a sorceress and take away the insurance girls. While the audience/readers and her close friend know she is a hero, her path of destruction has made her a feared villainess in her world, to the point a SympatheticInspectorAntagonist got away with arresting her with the charge of ''being Lina Inverse''. Even when she does something truly heroic and redeemable, she blows it by losing her cool and nuking the town she just saved. She rarely gets to claim her reward because it will likely be the down payment on rebuild the town from the ground up around the huge crater she just made.
* ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'': Soun Tendo is on the city council, but one has to wonder if that really helps given the amount of destruction his "son-in-law" and friends dish out on a regular basis. Even though there are those "Do Not Smash Wall" and "Do Not Crush Pole" signs everywhere.

to:

* ''{{LightNovel/Slayers}}''. Though, the poor innocent villagers probably ''would'' make Lina pay for the damage... if they could catch her.
**
her. Averted; in fact it's a running gag. She's basically what you get if you turn [[{{Trigun}} Vash the Stampede]] into a sorceress and take away the insurance girls. While the audience/readers and her close friend know she is a hero, her path of destruction has made her a feared villainess in her world, to the point a SympatheticInspectorAntagonist got away with arresting her with the charge of ''being Lina Inverse''. Even when she does something truly heroic and redeemable, she blows it by losing her cool and nuking the town she just saved. She rarely gets to claim her reward because it will likely be the down payment on rebuild the town from the ground up around the huge crater she just made.
* ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'': ''Manga/RanmaOneHalf'':
**
Soun Tendo is on the city council, but one has to wonder if that really helps given the amount of destruction his "son-in-law" and friends dish out on a regular basis. Even though there are those "Do Not Smash Wall" and "Do Not Crush Pole" signs everywhere.



* Deconstructed (like everything else) in ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion''. The series often lampshades how often that not only are the [=EVAs=] really costly to repair and maintain (it costing about enough money to bankrupt a small country to repair a severely damaged EVA after one battle), but how much time, effort, and money it takes to repair New Tokyo-3 as well as disposing the dead Angels (Ramiel sits in the middle of the city for weeks on end rotting before it gets completely disposed of).

to:

* ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion'':
**
Deconstructed (like everything else) in ''Anime/NeonGenesisEvangelion''.else). The series often lampshades how often that not only are the [=EVAs=] really costly to repair and maintain (it costing about enough money to bankrupt a small country to repair a severely damaged EVA after one battle), but how much time, effort, and money it takes to repair New Tokyo-3 as well as disposing the dead Angels (Ramiel sits in the middle of the city for weeks on end rotting before it gets completely disposed of).



*** It's not even a question of funding. The destruction of Eva-00 was a bigger explosion than any of the previous battles. We know Shinji's friends fled, but it's also a case of InferredHolocaust, even with the population in shelters.
*** There's almost nobody living in the city to begin with. Misato appears to be the only person actually living in her building, most wide shots of the city show little, if any, traffic, and almost every classroom in Shinji's school is empty...and this is ''before'' things start getting bad. Dialogue halfway through the series suggests that the population is down to actual NERV employees and a few diehards. It's only in the Rebuild movies that Tokyo-3 is ever depicted as having an appropriate population level for a city that size.

to:

*** ** It's not even a question of funding. The destruction of Eva-00 was a bigger explosion than any of the previous battles. We know Shinji's friends fled, but it's also a case of InferredHolocaust, even with the population in shelters.
*** ** There's almost nobody living in the city to begin with. Misato appears to be the only person actually living in her building, most wide shots of the city show little, if any, traffic, and almost every classroom in Shinji's school is empty...and this is ''before'' things start getting bad. Dialogue halfway through the series suggests that the population is down to actual NERV employees and a few diehards. It's only in the Rebuild movies that Tokyo-3 is ever depicted as having an appropriate population level for a city that size.



* Averted in ''TigerAndBunny''. Damages incurred by a superhero must be paid for either by his/her sponsor company or the hero him/herself. In the very first episode [[DestructiveSaviour Kotetsu]], the protagonist, is berated for damaging a monorail track in order to stop a hijacker. And in episode 5 he is brought before a judge who rules that his company be fined for the property that was destroyed during one of his rescue attempts in episode 4.
** To be precise, the city pays for any damage deemed necessary for the hero to capture a criminal and/or protect civilians. However, anything the city deems unnecessary is billed to the hero's sponsor company. So a hero who pulls a chunk out of the road in order to stop a bystander being shot would not be charged, but a hero who stomps a car's roof in when he could have just run around it would be charged. All of the heroes in the show are employees or owners of companies which use the hero's "brand" to generate money, so that they don't personally have to pay these charges (and also to generate a living wage for them, as they aren't directly paid to be heroes). One of the reasons co-protagonist Wild Tiger is nicknamed the "Crusher for Justice" is due to his habit of smashing things up with his super strength and earning himself a constant stream of large bills for his sponsor company to pay. The show actually begins with [[spoiler:his original sponsor company going out of business due to the large bills he receives. The only reason he agrees to be in a partnership with Barnaby is because the next company to hire him tells him to do it or quit, and implies that no other sponsor company would agree to take on a hero who's fame (and ability to generate money) is waning but continues to rack up such large bills.]]

to:

* Averted in ''TigerAndBunny''. Damages incurred by a superhero must be paid for either by his/her sponsor company or the hero him/herself. In the very first episode [[DestructiveSaviour Kotetsu]], the protagonist, is berated for damaging a monorail track in order to stop a hijacker. And in episode 5 he is brought before a judge who rules that his company be fined for the property that was destroyed during one of his rescue attempts in episode 4.
**
4. To be precise, the city pays for any damage deemed necessary for the hero to capture a criminal and/or protect civilians. However, anything the city deems unnecessary is billed to the hero's sponsor company. So a hero who pulls a chunk out of the road in order to stop a bystander being shot would not be charged, but a hero who stomps a car's roof in when he could have just run around it would be charged. All of the heroes in the show are employees or owners of companies which use the hero's "brand" to generate money, so that they don't personally have to pay these charges (and also to generate a living wage for them, as they aren't directly paid to be heroes). One of the reasons co-protagonist Wild Tiger is nicknamed the "Crusher for Justice" is due to his habit of smashing things up with his super strength and earning himself a constant stream of large bills for his sponsor company to pay. The show actually begins with [[spoiler:his original sponsor company going out of business due to the large bills he receives. The only reason he agrees to be in a partnership with Barnaby is because the next company to hire him tells him to do it or quit, and implies that no other sponsor company would agree to take on a hero who's fame (and ability to generate money) is waning but continues to rack up such large bills.]]



* The other series involving demons and exorcists, ''Manga/BlueExorcist'' tends to gloss over this kind of thing, though it does happen. Arguably, since the True Cross Order has been established for about ''two thousand'' years, they probably have this kind of thing down pat.

to:

* ''Manga/BlueExorcist'':
**
The other series involving demons and exorcists, ''Manga/BlueExorcist'' tends to gloss over this kind of thing, though it does happen. Arguably, since the True Cross Order has been established for about ''two thousand'' years, they probably have this kind of thing down pat.



* Lampshaded by [[MarvelUniverse Marvel Comics]] with their ''ComicBook/DamageControl'' series -- a comic book about the company which cleans up after super battles. D.C. has been shown to clean up very specific examples of property damage, enlisting the help of subcontractors. In the after-effects of the ''Civil War'', its created-for-the-story new CEO is shown to have helped cause damage so the company gets hired to fix it. And they also dealt with the aftermath of ''WorldWarHulk'', explaining why New York wasn't rubble just days after it was smashed.
** Marvel has also at times claimed that, despite having probably caused more property damage than Franchise/{{Godzilla}}, the Hulk hasn't actually killed any civilians during his rampages. Ever.
*** Amadeus Cho even claimed that Hulk didn't kill any ''military'', either!

to:

* MarvelUniverse:
**
Lampshaded by [[MarvelUniverse Marvel Comics]] with their ''ComicBook/DamageControl'' series -- a comic book about the company which cleans up after super battles. D.C. has been shown to clean up very specific examples of property damage, enlisting the help of subcontractors. In the after-effects of the ''Civil War'', its created-for-the-story new CEO is shown to have helped cause damage so the company gets hired to fix it. And they also dealt with the aftermath of ''WorldWarHulk'', explaining why New York wasn't rubble just days after it was smashed.
** Marvel has also at times claimed that, despite having probably caused more property damage than Franchise/{{Godzilla}}, the Hulk hasn't actually killed any civilians during his rampages. Ever.
***
Ever. Amadeus Cho even claimed that Hulk didn't kill any ''military'', either!either.



* In one issue of Franchise/{{Superman}}, Superboy has a nice big fight scene with a robot, and then attempts to fly away. Lex Luthor of all people calls out from the crowd, asking why he thinks he can just leave Metropolis with the cleaning bill. Superman arrives and actually sides with Lex, saying that he always sticks around to clean up after battles.
** Superman himself has actually been ''shown'' cleaning up after his particularly destructive battles. After Superman got his powers back post-Infinite Crisis and he and Lex Luthor had a huge smash-up in Metropolis, Supes was shown clearing debris and doing minor construction work (i.e. welding some support beams to the side of a slightly-damaged building to prevent it collapsing) potentially saving the city millions of dollars and months or years of work fixing the damage.
*** In the Golden and Silver Age stories, more often than not, he would repair even minor damage with super speed after he caused it.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'':
**
In one issue of Franchise/{{Superman}}, issue, Superboy has a nice big fight scene with a robot, and then attempts to fly away. Lex Luthor of all people calls out from the crowd, asking why he thinks he can just leave Metropolis with the cleaning bill. Superman arrives and actually sides with Lex, saying that he always sticks around to clean up after battles.
** Superman himself has actually been ''shown'' cleaning up after his particularly destructive battles. After Superman got his powers back post-Infinite Crisis and he and Lex Luthor had a huge smash-up in Metropolis, Supes was shown clearing debris and doing minor construction work (i.e. welding some support beams to the side of a slightly-damaged building to prevent it collapsing) potentially saving the city millions of dollars and months or years of work fixing the damage.
***
damage. In the Golden and Silver Age stories, more often than not, he would repair even minor damage with super speed after he caused it.



* This was a major plot point in a ''Flash'' storyline where Wally gets legally barred from Keystone City because of all the collateral damage that results from his everyday crime fighting. In order to make their case the city authorities even have accountants following him around and calculating the damage done in front of him.
** Also explained in another issue...where's it's pointed out that Wally is GREAT at construction...as he can build a bridge in minutes. Though, he does note that it's 'quick and dirty'...but, well...he could fix it up later.
* Vastly earlier issue 56 of Comicbook/TheAvengers where accountants were talking to the team, trying to account for all the damage caused during a fight with elemental golems. Most of the Avengers were dismissive about it, Thor left a bag of gold, IronMan reminded them that he was Tony Stark and could pay for it, and Cap... Cap handed over the parking ticket and the badge number of the officer who had ticketed the Quinjet when he'd made an emergency landing in an illegal zone. And the paperwork for having taken something out of a prison without filling in forms beforehand. The accountants loved him.
** An Avengers annual had the heroes touring a construction site. The GenreSavvy employees knew villains would not be far behind (it ''is'' a construction site) and indeed, they showed up. Without the heroes knowing, the employees put the smack down on all the bad guys.

to:

* This was a major plot point in a ''Flash'' storyline where Wally gets legally barred from Keystone City because of all the collateral damage that results from his everyday crime fighting. In order to make their case the city authorities even have accountants following him around and calculating the damage done in front of him.
**
him. Also explained in another issue...where's it's pointed out that Wally is GREAT at construction...as he can build a bridge in minutes. Though, he does note that it's 'quick and dirty'...but, well...he could fix it up later.
* Vastly earlier issue 56 of Comicbook/TheAvengers where accountants were talking to the team, trying to account for all the damage caused during a fight with elemental golems. Most of the Avengers were dismissive about it, Thor left a bag of gold, IronMan reminded them that he was Tony Stark and could pay for it, and Cap... Cap handed over the parking ticket and the badge number of the officer who had ticketed the Quinjet when he'd made an emergency landing in an illegal zone. And the paperwork for having taken something out of a prison without filling in forms beforehand. The accountants loved him.
**
him. An Avengers annual had the heroes touring a construction site. The GenreSavvy employees knew villains would not be far behind (it ''is'' a construction site) and indeed, they showed up. Without the heroes knowing, the employees put the smack down on all the bad guys.



* In the comic book series ''Comicbook/TheBoys'', a CIA subdivision is set up to take superheroes to task for the damages they incur. One character's girlfriend was graphically killed in front of him by a speedster throwing another superhuman into her, right after they traded "I love yous" for the first time.
** Of course, ''The Boys'' is, depending on who you ask, a deconstruction or just one long bitchfest about superheroes in general. While heroes in other genres might at least make token attempts to minimize property damage or justify it with equal contributions, the superpowered [[{{Jerkass}} jerkasses]] of The Boys just don't care and would slaughter a million civilians to apprehend a jaywalker.
* ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'', which takes a rather cynical view of superhero conventions, actually has the Authority helping out before and after supervillain attacks.
** Also somewhat unique in that the Authority often acknowledges that what they're doing will cause property damage and probably cost civilian lives. The characters justify it with the excuse that the bad guys would have done much worse if nobody had stopped them, but the fact that they ''openly acknowledge'' the cost of what they do is unique in itself.

to:

* In the comic book series ''Comicbook/TheBoys'', a CIA subdivision is set up to take superheroes to task for the damages they incur. One character's girlfriend was graphically killed in front of him by a speedster throwing another superhuman into her, right after they traded "I love yous" for the first time.
**
time. Of course, ''The Boys'' is, depending on who you ask, a deconstruction or just one long bitchfest about superheroes in general. While heroes in other genres might at least make token attempts to minimize property damage or justify it with equal contributions, the superpowered [[{{Jerkass}} jerkasses]] of The Boys just don't care and would slaughter a million civilians to apprehend a jaywalker.
* ''ComicBook/TheAuthority'', which takes a rather cynical view of superhero conventions, actually has the Authority helping out before and after supervillain attacks.
**
attacks. Also somewhat unique in that the Authority often acknowledges that what they're doing will cause property damage and probably cost civilian lives. The characters justify it with the excuse that the bad guys would have done much worse if nobody had stopped them, but the fact that they ''openly acknowledge'' the cost of what they do is unique in itself.



** Discussed again in the first ComicBook/{{New 52}} issue of ''Green Lantern Corps'', when Guy Gardner can't get a job as a high school football coach, largely because simply having him on school grounds on a regular basis would send the school's liability insurance rates through the roof. In the same issue, it's played with a bit again in John's scene, where he tries to convince the company that hired him to design a new building to incorporate expensive measures to minimize damage if it happens to get caught in a supervillain attack or real knock-down-drag-out hero/villain fight. They disagree about whether the added expense is worth it.
* In ''Comicbook/{{Miracleman}}'', the title character tosses a car at the villainous Kid Miracleman in a futile attempt to stop him. Recalling the battle, Miracleman says that his defenders claim the car was empty. "I'm sorry, but that simply isn't true."
** Even worse, it wasn't a car. It was a school bus full of children.

to:

** * Discussed again in the first ComicBook/{{New 52}} issue of ''Green Lantern Corps'', when Guy Gardner can't get a job as a high school football coach, largely because simply having him on school grounds on a regular basis would send the school's liability insurance rates through the roof. In the same issue, it's played with a bit again in John's scene, where he tries to convince the company that hired him to design a new building to incorporate expensive measures to minimize damage if it happens to get caught in a supervillain attack or real knock-down-drag-out hero/villain fight. They disagree about whether the added expense is worth it.
* In ''Comicbook/{{Miracleman}}'', the title character tosses a car at the villainous Kid Miracleman in a futile attempt to stop him. Recalling the battle, Miracleman says that his defenders claim the car was empty. "I'm sorry, but that simply isn't true."
**
" Even worse, it wasn't a car. It was a school bus full of children.



* The first incarnation of Marvel's ''{{Thunderbolts}}'' finished winning the hearts of [[BigApplesauce New York City]] in their first issue by staying behind to repair the damage to [[MonumentalBattle the Statue of Liberty]] caused in one of their battles.
** It was specifically mentioned that everyone was so happy to see a new team of heroes, that the metalworkers unions weren't going to sue their pants off for doing union work. Citizen V even alludes to the fact that superheroes cleaning up after themselves is usually ''not'' appreciated by those who would otherwise be paid to do it. Definitely a bit of lampshading for this trope.

to:

* The first incarnation of Marvel's ''{{Thunderbolts}}'' finished winning the hearts of [[BigApplesauce New York City]] in their first issue by staying behind to repair the damage to [[MonumentalBattle the Statue of Liberty]] caused in one of their battles.
**
battles. It was specifically mentioned that everyone was so happy to see a new team of heroes, that the metalworkers unions weren't going to sue their pants off for doing union work. Citizen V even alludes to the fact that superheroes cleaning up after themselves is usually ''not'' appreciated by those who would otherwise be paid to do it. Definitely a bit of lampshading for this trope.



* There was a comic in which ComicBook/SheHulk decided the Thing needed some stress relief, so she took him out to a bar for a few drinks and started a fight with him. However, the city block destroyed in the process was scheduled for demolition (and she knew it). In fact, the workers hired to demolish that city block spent most of the comic sitting on the bar roof cheering -- their contract said they got a hefty bonus if demolition was completed early, it didn't say the workers had to be the ones doing the demolishing.

to:

* ''ComicBook/SheHulk'':
**
There was a comic in which ComicBook/SheHulk She-Hulk decided the Thing needed some stress relief, so she took him out to a bar for a few drinks and started a fight with him. However, the city block destroyed in the process was scheduled for demolition (and she knew it). In fact, the workers hired to demolish that city block spent most of the comic sitting on the bar roof cheering -- their contract said they got a hefty bonus if demolition was completed early, it didn't say the workers had to be the ones doing the demolishing.



* Periodically lampshaded in ''Comicbook/AstroCity''. Characters will sometimes make passing references to the city's "great public works" program, usually in the wake of yet another superhero battle. The introduction to the "Local Heroes" TPB includes a newspaper clipping that mentions Honor Guard using alien AppliedPhlebotinum to repair damage after one of their fights.

to:

* ''Comicbook/AstroCity'':
**
Periodically lampshaded in ''Comicbook/AstroCity''.lampshaded. Characters will sometimes make passing references to the city's "great public works" program, usually in the wake of yet another superhero battle. The introduction to the "Local Heroes" TPB includes a newspaper clipping that mentions Honor Guard using alien AppliedPhlebotinum to repair damage after one of their fights.



* Averted in Kirkman's {{ComicBook/Invincible}} several times. Fairly early in the series, a duel between Invincible and [[TheExpy Omni-Man]] shatters entire skyscrapers, killing thousands -- so even when Invincible manages a PyrrhicVictory, he can never reveal his secret identity for fear of criminal charges or even assassination attempts against his family.
** The trope is averted several times later in the series as well. You'd think that a guy who publicly saved the Earth from annihilation multiple times would be forgiven when a moment's hesitation results in a city being vaporized... but that's not how humans think.

to:

* Averted in Kirkman's {{ComicBook/Invincible}} several times. Fairly early in the series, a duel between Invincible and [[TheExpy Omni-Man]] shatters entire skyscrapers, killing thousands -- so even when Invincible manages a PyrrhicVictory, he can never reveal his secret identity for fear of criminal charges or even assassination attempts against his family.
**
family. The trope is averted several times later in the series as well. You'd think that a guy who publicly saved the Earth from annihilation multiple times would be forgiven when a moment's hesitation results in a city being vaporized... but that's not how humans think.



-->'''Q''': Need I remind you, 007, that you have a license to kill, not to break traffic laws.

to:

-->'''Q''': --->'''Q''': Need I remind you, 007, that you have a license to kill, not to break traffic laws.



-->'''Q:''' Will you need collision insurance?\\

to:

-->'''Q:''' --->'''Q:''' Will you need collision insurance?\\



However, it is justifiable by context, in that Q is posing in that scene as an Avis rental agent, going through the pretence of filling in the necessary paperwork involved in any car rental agreement. They are secret agents, after all.

to:

** However, it is justifiable by context, in that Q is posing in that scene as an Avis rental agent, going through the pretence of filling in the necessary paperwork involved in any car rental agreement. They are secret agents, after all.



-->'''Boy''': Godzilla! Bye bye.
-->'''Tom Servo''': Thanks for leveling our country!
* The eponymous female lead of ''Film/ILoveYouBethCooper'' commits dozens of crimes during the movie, including fleeing the scene of an accident she caused by reckless driving and intentionally ramming a stolen car through a house wall in front of dozens of witnesses. Through sheer luck she doesn't actually hurt anyone but there is no suggestion at the end of the film that she is going to face any consequences at all for the thousands of dollars worth of property damage she inflicted during the film.
** In the book version it is mentioned that she only just gets away with it thanks to Tracee's dad being a lawyer.
** [[http://nowyourethinkinglikealawyer.blogspot.com/2009/07/i-love-you-beth-cooper-final-exam.html This blog]] suggests that the law might have made a legal defense difficult.

to:

-->'''Boy''': --->'''Boy''': Godzilla! Bye bye.
-->'''Tom
bye.\\
'''Tom
Servo''': Thanks for leveling our country!
* The eponymous female lead of ''Film/ILoveYouBethCooper'' commits dozens of crimes during the movie, including fleeing the scene of an accident she caused by reckless driving and intentionally ramming a stolen car through a house wall in front of dozens of witnesses. Through sheer luck she doesn't actually hurt anyone but there is no suggestion at the end of the film that she is going to face any consequences at all for the thousands of dollars worth of property damage she inflicted during the film.
**
film. In the book version it is mentioned that she only just gets away with it thanks to Tracee's dad being a lawyer.
**
lawyer. [[http://nowyourethinkinglikealawyer.blogspot.com/2009/07/i-love-you-beth-cooper-final-exam.html This blog]] suggests that the law might have made a legal defense difficult.



* At the end of ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', a New York City official is demanding, in an interview, that the superheroes be held responsible for the damage caused by the Chitauri invasion, claiming that it was "their fight". It's entirely possible that Tony might get sued (considering his is the only name known by the public of all the Avengers and he's the only one who can ''afford'' to pay for the damages). There's also the fact that the Stark Tower (and its ARC reactor) were used to open the portal.

to:

* Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse:
**
At the end of ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', a New York City official is demanding, in an interview, that the superheroes be held responsible for the damage caused by the Chitauri invasion, claiming that it was "their fight". It's entirely possible that Tony might get sued (considering his is the only name known by the public of all the Avengers and he's the only one who can ''afford'' to pay for the damages). There's also the fact that the Stark Tower (and its ARC reactor) were used to open the portal.



Film/DCExtendedUniverse



* In ''Film/PacificRim'' the [[HumongousMecha Jaegers]] cause probably billions of dollars worth of collateral damage. However, considering that it's them vs. ''[[ApocalypseHow the apocalypse]]'', you can see why people tolerate them.
** And it's known that standard proceedure is to intercept the Kaiju long before they make landfall. For several years, the Jaegers run a near flawless record. Fighting in and thus damaging cities is avoided and would only be a lot worse without the Jaegers, as a tactical nuclear strike is the only other effective anti-kaiju weapon.

to:

* In ''Film/PacificRim'' the [[HumongousMecha Jaegers]] cause probably billions of dollars worth of collateral damage. However, considering that it's them vs. ''[[ApocalypseHow the apocalypse]]'', you can see why people tolerate them.
**
them. And it's known that standard proceedure is to intercept the Kaiju long before they make landfall. For several years, the Jaegers run a near flawless record. Fighting in and thus damaging cities is avoided and would only be a lot worse without the Jaegers, as a tactical nuclear strike is the only other effective anti-kaiju weapon.



* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', after a battle in a cafe, Harry and the others take the time to actually repair the damage.
** Only to save their own hides. Other Death Eaters would've seen the damage and known where they were.
** However, it is very considerate of Hermione to pay for the food they steal while they're on the run.

to:

* In ''Literature/HarryPotterAndTheDeathlyHallows'', after a battle in a cafe, Harry and the others take the time to actually repair the damage.
**
damage. Only to save their own hides. Other Death Eaters would've seen the damage and known where they were.
**
were. However, it is very considerate of Hermione to pay for the food they steal while they're on the run.



* The Franchise/PowerRangers were bad about this. In the never ending series of the same name, the protagonists often leveled up to a quarter of the city they live in while fighting of some random mooks. Building destruction has been greatly toned down since 9/11, though.

to:

* ''Franchise/PowerRangers'':
**
The Franchise/PowerRangers Rangers were bad about this. In the never ending series of the same name, the protagonists often leveled up to a quarter of the city they live in while fighting of some random mooks. Building destruction has been greatly toned down since 9/11, though.



*** Also it has been shown that when the zords are on the move the Pink Ranger takes care of crowd control by directing traffic away from the combat zone.
*** And the premiere shows the B-Squad's status by showing them cleaning up the wreckage from the A-Squad's mecha battle. Presumably when [[JustForPun A-Squad goes AWOL]] and B-Squad takes over Earth's defense, they have lower-ranked cadets cleaning up ''their'' messes.

to:

*** ** Also it has been shown that when the zords are on the move the Pink Ranger takes care of crowd control by directing traffic away from the combat zone.
*** ** And the premiere shows the B-Squad's status by showing them cleaning up the wreckage from the A-Squad's mecha battle. Presumably when [[JustForPun A-Squad goes AWOL]] and B-Squad takes over Earth's defense, they have lower-ranked cadets cleaning up ''their'' messes.



* Lampshaded in the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Flooded". While assessing the damage after yet another fight with a demon has caused extensive damage to her house, Buffy asks: "I've trashed this house so many times. How did Mom pay for this?"

to:

* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
**
Lampshaded in the ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' episode "Flooded". While assessing the damage after yet another fight with a demon has caused extensive damage to her house, Buffy asks: "I've trashed this house so many times. How did Mom pay for this?"



--->'''Cordelia''': I don't get it. Buffy's the Slayer, shouldn't she haveó
--->'''Xander''': What, a license to kill?
--->'''Cordelia''': Well, not for fun, but she's like this Superman. Shouldn't there be different rules for her?

to:

--->'''Cordelia''': I don't get it. Buffy's the Slayer, shouldn't she haveó
--->'''Xander''':
have--\\
'''Xander''':
What, a license to kill?
--->'''Cordelia''':
kill?\\
'''Cordelia''':
Well, not for fun, but she's like this Superman. Shouldn't there be different rules for her?



* The whole premise of the upcoming DCComics series ''Powerless''. The show examines how a normal person living in the DCUniverse would react to all the chaos and collateral damage caused by superheroes and their villains.

to:

* The whole premise of the upcoming DCComics series ''Powerless''.''Series/{{Powerless}}''. The show examines how a normal person living in the DCUniverse would react to all the chaos and collateral damage caused by superheroes and their villains.



* Subverted in ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' with the Faultline zone, the victim of a massive earthquake attack by a tectonics-controlling villain, which for years remained as a giant deserted fissure in the ground. Faultline only started being slowly rebuilt a year or two ago.

to:

* ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'':
**
Subverted in ''VideoGame/CityOfHeroes'' with the Faultline zone, the victim of a massive earthquake attack by a tectonics-controlling villain, which for years remained as a giant deserted fissure in the ground. Faultline only started being slowly rebuilt a year or two ago.



* ''VideoGame/ESPRaDe'', on multiple occasions, makes civilian buildings and vehicles in Tokyo-2 fair game--such as parts of Houoh High School, and the cars on the street just before fighting the "Izuna" Assault Tank in the shopping mall stage. There's no penalty, in-game or story-wise, for doing so.

to:

* ''VideoGame/ESPRaDe'', ''VideoGame/ESPRaDe'':
** The game,
on multiple occasions, makes civilian buildings and vehicles in Tokyo-2 fair game--such as parts of Houoh High School, and the cars on the street just before fighting the "Izuna" Assault Tank in the shopping mall stage. There's no penalty, in-game or story-wise, for doing so.



* Aversion: in ''{{X-COM}} Apocalypse'', you have the option of paying for any collateral damage you do while cleaning buildings from aliens. If you don't, the owners may attack you the next time you have to go in.

to:

* Aversion: in ''{{X-COM}} Apocalypse'', you ''{{XCOM}} Apocalypse'':
** You
have the option of paying for any collateral damage you do while cleaning buildings from aliens. If you don't, the owners may attack you the next time you have to go in.



* Played with in ''Franchise/MassEffect'', in which Shepard is a Spectre and has broad operational authority to do whatever the heck he/she feels like but still gets chewed out by his/her superiors for any collateral damage.

to:

* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
**
Played with in ''Franchise/MassEffect'', with, in which Shepard is a Spectre and has broad operational authority to do whatever the heck he/she feels like but still gets chewed out by his/her superiors for any collateral damage.



* Also subverted in the original ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'', where if you burn down/destroy certain doors, the owners of said doors make you pay them for the damage. This also happens in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames'' sub-series.
** In at least one instance, burning through a door has the inhabitant of the house pay ''you''.
* I don't remember any actual penalties for impromptu demolitions in ''VideoGame/{{Mercenaries}}: Playground of Destruction''. Of course, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin with a title like that...]] Being in a war zone might mitigate this, although there's still penalties for killing civilians off, no matter how annoying or stupid.
** There aren't. Unless you blow up either a keep-it-upright mission objective, or someone's HQ ...in the words of the intro, you can level half of North Korea and not be bothered, as long as you only harm soldiers and structures. Killing civvies and reporters, however, does carry a stiff fine.
** The sequel keeps it the same - unless you murder civilians, where money is deducted in the forms of bribes. Your VoiceWithAnInternetConnection will complain about having to do the bribing to smooth things out.

to:

* Also subverted in the original ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaI'', where if you burn down/destroy certain doors, the owners of said doors make you pay them for the damage. This also happens in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOracleGames'' sub-series.
**
sub-series. In at least one instance, burning through a door has the inhabitant of the house pay ''you''.
* I don't remember any actual penalties for impromptu demolitions in ''VideoGame/{{Mercenaries}}: Playground of Destruction''. Of course, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin with a title like that...]] Being in a war zone might mitigate this, although there's still penalties for killing civilians off, no matter how annoying or stupid.
** There aren't. Unless you blow up either a keep-it-upright mission objective, or someone's HQ ...in the words of the intro, you can level half of North Korea and not be bothered, as long as you only harm soldiers and structures. Killing civvies and reporters, however, does carry a stiff fine.
** The sequel keeps it the same - unless you murder civilians, where money is deducted in the forms of bribes. Your VoiceWithAnInternetConnection will complain about having to do the bribing to smooth things out.
''you''.



* Lan/Netto commits so many felonies during the course of the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' series that the LetsPlay of it actually harps on the fact.
** It's actually less egregious than other examples because he very rarely breaks physical stuff - Lan mostly sneaks somewhere he is not allowed to be in pursuit of of the current villain. And because he manages to save the day, officials can let it slide.
** The sequel series ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' lampshades hero insurance in the 2nd game, Omega-Xis mentions being considered a hero is something to be proud of, and that because of it, people won't mind if they cause damage.

to:

* Lan/Netto commits so many felonies during the course of the ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' series that the LetsPlay of it actually harps on the fact.
**
fact. It's actually less egregious than other examples because he very rarely breaks physical stuff - Lan mostly sneaks somewhere he is not allowed to be in pursuit of of the current villain. And because he manages to save the day, officials can let it slide.
**
slide. The sequel series ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce'' lampshades hero insurance in the 2nd game, Omega-Xis mentions being considered a hero is something to be proud of, and that because of it, people won't mind if they cause damage.



* In the 2009 ''VideoGame/{{Ghostbusters|the video game}}'' game, it's revealed early on that the Ghostbusters no longer work for the ''people'' of New York, but for the ''city'' of New York, with a contract to take care of any and all paranormal disturbances. In addition, the city has a lucrative insurance contract for damage due to either paranormal entities or paranormal "investigations". In fact, the mayor got the insurance policy after the Ghostbusters endorsed him in the election campaign, and it's outright stated by Ray that it probably won the election for the mayor. In addition, there's an oversight committee, headed by the [[SarcasmMode ever-lovable]] [[ObstructiveBureaucrat Walter Peck]], called the Paranormal Contract Oversight Committee.
** And the icing on the cake: the game TRACKS how much property damage the Ghostbusters incur.

to:

* In the 2009 ''VideoGame/{{Ghostbusters|the video game}}'' game, it's revealed early on that the Ghostbusters no longer work for the ''people'' of New York, but for the ''city'' of New York, with a contract to take care of any and all paranormal disturbances. In addition, the city has a lucrative insurance contract for damage due to either paranormal entities or paranormal "investigations". In fact, the mayor got the insurance policy after the Ghostbusters endorsed him in the election campaign, and it's outright stated by Ray that it probably won the election for the mayor. In addition, there's an oversight committee, headed by the [[SarcasmMode ever-lovable]] [[ObstructiveBureaucrat Walter Peck]], called the Paranormal Contract Oversight Committee.
**
Committee. And the icing on the cake: the game TRACKS how much property damage the Ghostbusters incur.



* [[http://www.evil-comic.com/archive/20060420.html Parodied]] in EvilInc. One of the services the titular company provides is "Battlefield Location and Booking" which seeks out abandoned locations for villains and heroes to battle to avoid lawsuits from any property damage and casualties. This could also be considered an inversion since, as the name of the company indicates, it's the ''supervillains'' who are in charge of this service.
** If there's one thing supervillans probably will hate more than superheroes, it's ''lawyers''.

to:

* [[http://www.evil-comic.com/archive/20060420.html Parodied]] in EvilInc. One of the services the titular company provides is "Battlefield Location and Booking" which seeks out abandoned locations for villains and heroes to battle to avoid lawsuits from any property damage and casualties. This could also be considered an inversion since, as the name of the company indicates, it's the ''supervillains'' who are in charge of this service.
**
service. If there's one thing supervillans probably will hate more than superheroes, it's ''lawyers''.



* Subverted in ''TheMadScientistWars''. Xyon City has an "{{abandoned warehouse district}}" that is paid for by a tax on explosives. When old abandoned warehouses are destroyed, new ones are built. The reasoning seems to be that if people are going to blow stuff up, it might as well be in a designated area away from the important stuff. Played straight in that this doesn't always work.
** A storyline invovles the characters trying to run a group of heroes out of town, partially because of this trope.

to:

* Subverted in ''TheMadScientistWars''.''TheMadScientistWars'':
** Subverted.
Xyon City has an "{{abandoned warehouse district}}" that is paid for by a tax on explosives. When old abandoned warehouses are destroyed, new ones are built. The reasoning seems to be that if people are going to blow stuff up, it might as well be in a designated area away from the important stuff. Played straight in that this doesn't always work.
** A storyline invovles involves the characters trying to run a group of heroes out of town, partially because of this trope.



* Megas in ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR'' regularly destroys significant chunks of the vicinity while he smashes the MonsterOfTheWeek. It's mostly PlayedForLaughs since Coop's a loveable buffoon, and the stuff he destroys often has signs that say things like "Conveniently Empty Building" and "We Were Going to Tear This Down Anyway". Plus it takes place in New Jersey, where such destruction might actually serve as an improvement...

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR'':
**
Megas in ''WesternAnimation/MegasXLR'' regularly destroys significant chunks of the vicinity while he smashes the MonsterOfTheWeek. It's mostly PlayedForLaughs since Coop's a loveable buffoon, and the stuff he destroys often has signs that say things like "Conveniently Empty Building" and "We Were Going to Tear This Down Anyway". Plus it takes place in New Jersey, where such destruction might actually serve as an improvement...



* ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' don't seem at all concerned about how much collateral damage they cause defeating the monsters that invade Townsville -- the monsters alone would probably cause less damage. The citizens of Townsville have apparently gotten used to this... but Citiesville, where the girls temporarily move to, is not so understanding:
-->'''Citiesville Mayor''': ''At what time'' did it seem like a good idea to blow up the Citiesville Bridge? Do you realize that the bank robbers you captured stole approximately $400? Do you realize you did ''several million dollars'' IN PROPERTY DAMAGE TO THAT BRIDGE?!!"
** In another episode, when the girls' class has Career Day, Hanut's father comes in. In a deadpan style, he says that he insures buildings in Townsville from damage... and that he is a veeeeeery busy man.
*** Of course, it's best not to think of [[FridgeLogic how unlikely it is that any insurance company would agree to insure buildings in Townsville at all]].
** And then there is TheMovie of the girls' origins, in which they almost destroy pretty much the entire town. [[GooGooGodlike From playing tag]]. Professor Utonium is actually arrested over this, and there is talk of the girls being incarcerated.
*** Said movie also shows that Townsville pre-Powerpuffs is a horrifying dystopia of crime and violence where criminals run rampant and the police seemingly never leave their favorite store, the [[IncrediblyLamePun Donut Thing]]. The Powerpuffs might cause a lot of property damage, but Townsville seems to think that the reduced crime rate is worth it.
** In still another episode, the Professor is horribly worried about the girls' getting injured, and so builds a HumongousMecha for them to use. They refuse to...until they come up against a bigger monster that even they can't handle. They win... but level virtually all of Townsville doing it. The Mayor thanks them, then asks them whose stupid idea the big robot suit was. When they say it was the Professor's, he decides he'll let them off as long as they promise ''never to use it again''. They're only too happy to agree, as the thing was damn finicky to work with.
*** The suit returns in a later episode after The Mayor unwittingly activated the autopilot, and it's just as destructive as before

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'':
** The girls
don't seem at all concerned about how much collateral damage they cause defeating the monsters that invade Townsville -- the monsters alone would probably cause less damage. The citizens of Townsville have apparently gotten used to this... but Citiesville, where the girls temporarily move to, is not so understanding:
-->'''Citiesville --->'''Citiesville Mayor''': ''At what time'' did it seem like a good idea to blow up the Citiesville Bridge? Do you realize that the bank robbers you captured stole approximately $400? Do you realize you did ''several million dollars'' IN PROPERTY DAMAGE TO THAT BRIDGE?!!"
BRIDGE?!!
** In another episode, when the girls' class has Career Day, Hanut's father comes in. In a deadpan style, he says that he insures buildings in Townsville from damage... and that he is a veeeeeery busy man.
***
man. Of course, it's best not to think of [[FridgeLogic how unlikely it is that any insurance company would agree to insure buildings in Townsville at all]].
** And then there is TheMovie of the girls' origins, in which they almost destroy pretty much the entire town. [[GooGooGodlike From playing tag]]. Professor Utonium is actually arrested over this, and there is talk of the girls being incarcerated.
***
incarcerated. Said movie also shows that Townsville pre-Powerpuffs is a horrifying dystopia of crime and violence where criminals run rampant and the police seemingly never leave their favorite store, the [[IncrediblyLamePun Donut Thing]]. The Powerpuffs might cause a lot of property damage, but Townsville seems to think that the reduced crime rate is worth it.
** In still another episode, the Professor is horribly worried about the girls' getting injured, and so builds a HumongousMecha for them to use. They refuse to...until they come up against a bigger monster that even they can't handle. They win... but level virtually all of Townsville doing it. The Mayor thanks them, then asks them whose stupid idea the big robot suit was. When they say it was the Professor's, he decides he'll let them off as long as they promise ''never to use it again''. They're only too happy to agree, as the thing was damn finicky to work with.
***
with. The suit returns in a later episode after The Mayor unwittingly activated the autopilot, and it's just as destructive as before



* From ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'''s SuperheroEpisode:
-->'''Mayor:''' ''Thank you, mysterious heroes! The value of the Gemerald you saved is slightly greater than the cost of the damage you caused to this museum: A net gain for our great city!''

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'':
**
From ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'''s the SuperheroEpisode:
-->'''Mayor:''' ''Thank --->'''Mayor:''' Thank you, mysterious heroes! The value of the Gemerald you saved is slightly greater than the cost of the damage you caused to this museum: A net gain for our great city!''city!



* Subverted in ''TheTick''. Arthur's attempt to break through the SidekickGlassCeiling ends with a climactic battle with the Tick, in which a restaurant was partially trashed. The episode ends with the reunited heroes fixing the same restaurant, with the maitre d' profusely thanking them: "When most superheroes have their brawls, they just leave a mess."

to:

* Subverted in ''TheTick''.''WesternAnimation/TheTick'':
** Subverted.
Arthur's attempt to break through the SidekickGlassCeiling ends with a climactic battle with the Tick, in which a restaurant was partially trashed. The episode ends with the reunited heroes fixing the same restaurant, with the maitre d' profusely thanking them: "When most superheroes have their brawls, they just leave a mess."



" Der Fledermous, can you tell us what the superhero community plans to do about this menace?"\\

to:

" Der "Der Fledermous, can you tell us what the superhero community plans to do about this menace?"\\



* The {{DCAU}} had its share of this as well: witness [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ywo6F4xYTvA this]] battle between Franchise/{{Superman}} and Darkseid, which is made all the funnier by [[FanNickname Supes]] monologuing about how he [[WorldOfCardboardSpeech usually has to hold back so nobody gets hurt]]. Gee, I guess all those buildings he punches Darkseid through were conveniently evacuated moments before? Conversely, the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2BvSqqmidM fight between Superman and Captain Marvel]] was conveniently set in an empty city. Two [[TheCape Capes]] tearing up Metropolis over an argument might have stretched the suspension of disbelief just a little too much.

to:

* The {{DCAU}} had its share of this as well: witness well:
** Witness
[[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ywo6F4xYTvA this]] battle between Franchise/{{Superman}} and Darkseid, which is made all the funnier by [[FanNickname Supes]] monologuing about how he [[WorldOfCardboardSpeech usually has to hold back so nobody gets hurt]]. Gee, I guess all those buildings he punches Darkseid through were conveniently evacuated moments before? Conversely, the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B2BvSqqmidM fight between Superman and Captain Marvel]] was conveniently set in an empty city. Two [[TheCape Capes]] tearing up Metropolis over an argument might have stretched the suspension of disbelief just a little too much.



*** ''Somehow''? Franchise/{{Batman}} is a member! Superman even glances at him for confirmation before saying that.
*** Squeezing coal into diamonds is one of Supes' powers.
*** Merchandizing. JLA gets royalties for every movie, action figure, poster comic, talk show,etc they do. They actually mention this as one source of income. And then there's Batman using his super computer systems for insider trading through dummy accounts to set up hundreds of discrete accounts they can draw funds from.
*** Which would invoke [[YouFailEconomicsForever another]] trope.



*** Of course, this ''is'' Franchise/{{Superman}} we're talking about here. The guy can literally punch someone a mile, use his telescopic and XRayVision to examine the spot they're going to land for civilians, zip off to move any inconvenient bystanders clear at SuperSpeed, and return to the scene of the battle to chat with his allies before anyone other than TheFlash had even noticed he'd gone anywhere. It takes a lot of work to look that reckless [[NoEndorHolocaust (without actually killing anyone)]].



* In ''WesternAnimation/SupermanDoomsday,'' Supes throws Doomsday through a building on more than one occasion, and eventually defeats him by taking him to orbit and slamming him into the ground in the middle of Metropolis hard enough to level the entire block. In real life, Supes would've racked up a higher death toll than all the villains in the movie put together with that move. And he may well have, as this being a direct-to-DVD release rather than a TV episode, people were being explicitly killed in the show...but he was "dead" at that point, and he ''did'' stop Doomsday, who had wiped out entire ''worlds'' on his own.
** To put this in perspective, Metropolis is essentially in the same place as New York City. In the comic arc that this was based on the Justice League engaged Doomsday in central Ohio, and would have been completely wiped out if Superman hadn't shown up when he did. The battle between the two stretched over a third of the country, and left more than a thousand dead in its wake. The government's position was that anything that could take that kind of punishment was a serious enough threat that even losing most of Metropolis would have been a [[GodzillaThreshold justifiable price]] for putting it down.
* Lampshaded in ''TransformersAnimated''. When Optimus Prime crashes into a truck, he apologized and says he heard something called "insurance" will cover that.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/SupermanDoomsday,'' Supes throws Doomsday through a building on more than one occasion, and eventually defeats him by taking him to orbit and slamming him into the ground in the middle of Metropolis hard enough to level the entire block. In real life, Supes would've racked up a higher death toll than all the villains in the movie put together with that move. And he may well have, as this being a direct-to-DVD release rather than a TV episode, people were being explicitly killed in the show...but he was "dead" at that point, and he ''did'' stop Doomsday, who had wiped out entire ''worlds'' on his own.
**
own. To put this in perspective, Metropolis is essentially in the same place as New York City. In the comic arc that this was based on the Justice League engaged Doomsday in central Ohio, and would have been completely wiped out if Superman hadn't shown up when he did. The battle between the two stretched over a third of the country, and left more than a thousand dead in its wake. The government's position was that anything that could take that kind of punishment was a serious enough threat that even losing most of Metropolis would have been a [[GodzillaThreshold justifiable price]] for putting it down.
* Lampshaded in ''TransformersAnimated''.''WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated'':
** Lampshaded.
When Optimus Prime crashes into a truck, he apologized and says he heard something called "insurance" will cover that.



*** They also get called on it more than once, especially GentleGiant Bulkhead. It's not fear that makes public opinion towards them someone ambivalent--it's the fact that they keep breaking stuff.
*** Averted in Generation One's third-season episode "The Burden Hardest to Bear" where Rodimus Prime is chewed out by Japanese politicians and business men over the damage caused in recent battles. This forms the basis for his TakeThisJobAndShoveIt moment.

to:

*** ** They also get called on it more than once, especially GentleGiant Bulkhead. It's not fear that makes public opinion towards them someone ambivalent--it's the fact that they keep breaking stuff.
*** ** Averted in Generation One's third-season episode "The Burden Hardest to Bear" where Rodimus Prime is chewed out by Japanese politicians and business men over the damage caused in recent battles. This forms the basis for his TakeThisJobAndShoveIt moment.



* Cyborg from ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' once used a ''building'' against Plasmus. Perhaps TheAbridgedSeries' line that "This city already has its own destructive jerks - the Teen Titans!" was closer than you'd think.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'':
**
Cyborg from ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans'' once used a ''building'' against Plasmus. Perhaps TheAbridgedSeries' line that "This city already has its own destructive jerks - the Teen Titans!" was closer than you'd think.



*** Raven has Cyborg beat in "Birthmark", where pretty much the entire city, frozen in time mind you, becomes her weapons. She used ''two buildings'' to try to crush Slade, who had superpowers at the time and survived unscathed. It's hard to believe that those buildings, or even half the cars, were empty.

to:

*** ** Raven has Cyborg beat in "Birthmark", where pretty much the entire city, frozen in time mind you, becomes her weapons. She used ''two buildings'' to try to crush Slade, who had superpowers at the time and survived unscathed. It's hard to believe that those buildings, or even half the cars, were empty.



* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': Korra catches a trio of gangster benders and she's arrested along with the thugs for causing far more damage than the thugs would have if left unchecked. [[DaChief Chief Bei Fong]] explicitly tells Korra that the fact that she's the Avatar means squat to her.

to:

* Averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'': ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'':
**
Korra catches a trio of gangster benders and she's arrested along with the thugs for causing far more damage than the thugs would have if left unchecked. [[DaChief Chief Bei Fong]] explicitly tells Korra that the fact that she's the Avatar means squat to her.



* The [[FanNickname Mane 6]] of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' have caused a surprising amount of damage to poor old Ponyville. Their reasons for wanton destruction are usually caused for decidedly unheroic and mundane reasons ([[MundaneFantastic Well, mundane within the show's context at least]]) and include a flubbed spell to drive out [[ExplosiveBreeder parasprites]], [[CloudCuckooLander Pinkie Pie]] finding a ''cloning pool'', and Twilight afraid of being late for a homework assignment. However, since they're the heroes, not once are they called on it.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'':
**
The [[FanNickname Mane 6]] of ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic'' have caused a surprising amount of damage to poor old Ponyville. Their reasons for wanton destruction are usually caused for decidedly unheroic and mundane reasons ([[MundaneFantastic Well, mundane within the show's context at least]]) and include a flubbed spell to drive out [[ExplosiveBreeder parasprites]], [[CloudCuckooLander Pinkie Pie]] finding a ''cloning pool'', and Twilight afraid of being late for a homework assignment. However, since they're the heroes, not once are they called on it.



* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', the Crystal Gems regulary are in the middle of destruction of Beach City. Most citizens complain, but quickly bounce back. Only Mr. Pizza got seriously angry at one point and asked for repairs. The Gems ignored him and Steven apologized for them which Mr. Pizza accepted. It's never mentioned how the town pays for all the repair costs.
** In the Gems defense, one episode explains that the Gems had actually warned the citizens ancestors about settling there since they would be in danger. The humans settled anyway and most have grown up with the weirdness, only reacting confused or in panic when directly confronted by it.

to:

* In ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'', the Crystal Gems regulary are in the middle of destruction of Beach City. Most citizens complain, but quickly bounce back. Only Mr. Pizza got seriously angry at one point and asked for repairs. The Gems ignored him and Steven apologized for them which Mr. Pizza accepted. It's never mentioned how the town pays for all the repair costs.
**
costs. In the Gems Gems' defense, one episode explains that the Gems had actually warned the citizens ancestors about settling there since they would be in danger. The humans settled anyway and most have grown up with the weirdness, only reacting confused or in panic when directly confronted by it.
3rd Jun '16 12:35:34 PM hullflyer
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** Lampshaded in ''Film/LethalWeapon3'' were they got demoted after Riggs blew up a building when he tried to defuse a bomb.

to:

** Lampshaded in ''Film/LethalWeapon3'' were where they got demoted after Riggs blew up a building when he tried to defuse a bomb.
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