History Main / HereditaryRepublic

26th Feb '17 3:26:03 AM mirisu92
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* All of these examples probably pale in comparison with the Philippines, where [[GenerationXerox two parent-and-child tandems have been President]] (Diosdado Macapagal and daughter Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo / Corazon "Cory" Aquino and son Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III), where the entire government is at the mercy of around [[UpToEleven 178 families]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines see the full list here]]), where ''at least three in four'' members of Congress have other relatives sitting in office, and where some families have held power in the same province or city for almost a century if not more. The list of examples run from the Aquinos to the Arroyos to the Binays to the Marcoses � and so on ''ad infinitum''. In fact, if not for the need to pretend at democracy, all that's missing is a formal peerage system.

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* All of these examples probably pale in comparison with the Philippines, UsefulNotes/{{Philippines}}, where [[GenerationXerox two parent-and-child tandems have been President]] (Diosdado Macapagal and daughter Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo / Corazon "Cory" Aquino and son Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III), where the entire government is at the mercy of around [[UpToEleven 178 families]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines see the full list here]]), where ''at least three in four'' members of Congress have other relatives sitting in office, and where some families have held power in the same province or city for almost a century if not more. The list of examples run from the Aquinos to the Arroyos to the Binays to the Marcoses � and so on ''ad infinitum''. In fact, if not for the need to pretend at democracy, all that's missing is a formal peerage system.



** Consider that a study was done on the effect of family pedigree on winnability at the elections. The results revealed that, other factors constant, any candidate is ''four times more likely'' to win an election if he or she has at least one other relative in office. [[NightmareFuel Make of that what you will.]]

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** Consider that a study was done on the effect of family pedigree on winnability at the elections. The results revealed that, other factors constant, any candidate is candidates who win the first time, even in effectively random circumstances, are ''four times more likely'' to win an election if he or she has at least one have other relative relatives running for office in office.future. [[NightmareFuel Make of that what you will.]]
17th Feb '17 6:43:18 PM Fireblood
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* In the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series, there are no literal examples, but does have two nations (Siddermark and the Temple Lands) where most candidates for the head of state position tend to be from a limited number of families, so it's hardly uncommon for the current ruler to be a descendant of a previous one, even if it doesn't literally pass down from father to son.

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* In the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series, there are no literal examples, but it does have two nations (Siddermark and the Temple Lands) where most candidates for the head of state position tend to be from a limited number of families, so it's hardly uncommon for the current ruler to be a descendant of a previous one, even if it doesn't literally pass down from father to son.
17th Feb '17 1:49:10 PM Narsil
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Added DiffLines:

** For the first couple of centuries after Augustus, it was rare for a ruler to pass power to his own son--far more commonly, the ruler would adopt a suitable heir (often marrying that heir to his daughter). That said, this was largely by chance. Very few of those emperors had adult or near-adult male sons when they died, and the few who did almost invariably picked that son as heir.
9th Jan '17 5:45:08 PM Bissek
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* In the ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'' series, there are no literal examples, but does have two nations (Siddermark and the Temple Lands) where most candidates for the head of state position tend to be from a limited number of families, so it's hardly uncommon for the current ruler to be a descendant of a previous one, even if it doesn't literally pass down from father to son.
17th Dec '16 2:12:22 AM RobTan
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder: Western Animation ]]

* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'', while burying the Springfield time capsule, Mayor Quimby says it will be opened in the 31st Century "...by some future Mayor Quimby"

[[/folder]]
13th Dec '16 8:56:30 PM karstovich2
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** North Korea doesn't quite operate like a "normal" hereditary monarchy, as Kim Jong-un is actually Kim Jong-il's ''youngest'' son. What happened to Jong-un's two older brothers? Well, the eldest brother was disowned by the family for trying to sneak into [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Tokyo Disneyland]]. And Kim Jong-il thought his middle son was "no good because he is like a little girl". Kim Jong-un also has an older sister, but she was obviously never in the running in North Korea's highly patriarchal society.

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** North Korea doesn't quite operate like a "normal" hereditary monarchy, as Kim Jong-un is actually Kim Jong-il's ''youngest'' son. What happened to Jong-un's two older brothers? Well, the eldest brother was disowned by the family for trying to sneak into [[Ride/DisneyThemeParks Tokyo Disneyland]]. And Kim Jong-il thought his middle son was "no good because he is like a little girl". Kim All this being said, none of this is especially unusual in the traditional monarchies of East Asia; historically, Chinese, Korean, and Japanese kings and emperors would frequently pass over older sons they deemed unworthy, and even in those times and places where a rule was in effect that would seem to dictate the monarch's choice (most typically, that the heir had to be the eldest son of the official empress or queen, i.e. the monarch's favored consort), ways were often found to ensure the crown went to the desired heir (for instance, if the "heir's mother must be official empress/queen" rule were in effect and the desired heir's mother was not the empress/queen, the monarch would depose the current empress/queen and replace her with the desired heir's mother). (Kim Jong-un also has an older sister, but she was obviously never in the running in North Korea's highly patriarchal society.)
1st Dec '16 9:59:24 PM SSJMagus
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** There have been three cases when a president has been the descendant of a previous one: UsefulNotes/JohnQuincyAdams and UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush were the sons of UsefulNotes/JohnAdams and UsefulNotes/GeorgeHWBush, respectively, while UsefulNotes/BenjaminHarrison was the grandson of UsefulNotes/WilliamHenryHarrison. UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt and UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt were distant cousins who were also closely related by marriage.\\

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** There have been three cases when a president has been the descendant of a previous one: UsefulNotes/JohnQuincyAdams and UsefulNotes/GeorgeWBush were the sons of UsefulNotes/JohnAdams and UsefulNotes/GeorgeHWBush, respectively, while UsefulNotes/BenjaminHarrison was the grandson of UsefulNotes/WilliamHenryHarrison. UsefulNotes/TheodoreRoosevelt and UsefulNotes/FranklinDRoosevelt were distant cousins [[KissingCousins who were also closely related by marriage.marriage]].\\
1st Dec '16 9:57:43 PM SSJMagus
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* England (and Wales), Scotland and Ireland were a republic under UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell, who was succeeded by his son Richard, though this was mainly because Cromwell most emphatically refused the crown that Parliament was fully prepared to offer him. Other than that he was the King in everything but name. Richard was widely hated. After this dynasty began, people figured they might as well restore the monarchy and invited back the last king's son from exile to become Charles II.

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* England (and Wales), Scotland and Ireland were a republic under UsefulNotes/OliverCromwell, who was succeeded by his son Richard, though this was mainly because Cromwell most emphatically refused the crown that Parliament was fully prepared to offer him. Other than that he was the King in everything but name.name (indeed Cromwell held ''more'' power than the King of England he overthrew had held). Richard was widely hated. After this dynasty began, people figured they might as well restore the monarchy and invited back the last king's son from exile to become Charles II.
25th Nov '16 6:50:39 AM Jhonny
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There ''are'', however, some republics in which the power resides in the hands of a single family, just as it would in a monarchy, except they refer to their leaders by republican titles (usually president), and there is no actual law stating that the succession works thusly. It usually overlaps with JustTheFirstCitizen.

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There ''are'', however, some republics in which the power resides in the hands of a single family, just as it would in a monarchy, except they refer to their leaders by republican titles (usually president), president, but sometimes Prime Minister), and there is no actual law stating that the succession works thusly. It usually overlaps with JustTheFirstCitizen.
25th Nov '16 6:50:11 AM Jhonny
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It gets hazy around the edges when the dynasty merely occupies most positions, or there are several BlueBlood or OldMoney families that frequently rotate through the same office. Historically most republics (in contrast to democracies) have tended to have been oligarchies, where either the highest aristocrat or the highest plutocrat families have elected a state head amongst an inner circle of candidates, easily creating "hereditary" state heads - especially if two competing families have elected a third family representant to prevent their competitor becoming too influential.

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It gets hazy around the edges when the dynasty merely occupies most positions, or there are several BlueBlood or OldMoney families that frequently rotate through the same office. Historically most republics (in contrast to democracies) have tended to have been oligarchies, where either the highest aristocrat or the highest plutocrat families have elected a state head of government amongst an inner circle of candidates, easily creating "hereditary" state heads of government - especially if two competing families have elected a third family representant representative to prevent their competitor becoming too influential.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.HereditaryRepublic