History Main / HereditaryRepublic

1st Feb '16 9:13:42 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''officially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They waited three centuries before finally dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.
to:
* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''officially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They Empire, but they waited three centuries before finally dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.dictatorship when the ''Princeps'' became ''Dominus''.
21st Jan '16 5:23:39 PM zarpaulus
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Added DiffLines:
** Even before Caesar the Senate and most elected positions in the Roman Republic were only open to Patricians, Rome's hereditary aristocracy.
27th Nov '15 6:53:15 PM Fireblood
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* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''oficially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They waited three centuries before finally dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.
to:
* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''oficially'' ''officially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They waited three centuries before finally dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.
25th Nov '15 9:24:15 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''oficially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They waited three centuries before dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.
to:
* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''oficially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They waited three centuries before finally dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.
25th Nov '15 9:23:47 AM Morgenthaler
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* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''oficially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire.
to:
* TheRomanEmpire, at least at first. Augustus Caesar was, after all, [[JustTheFirstCitizen only the Republic's First Citizen]] (the term became "prince" later, which itself itself came from the word "first" in Latin), and throughout his dynasty, there was juggling of the actual offices held. The pretense slid away slowly, because Rome's previous bad experience with monarchy meant it was politically expedient to not admit becoming one again. There wasn't actually any specific point at which the Roman Republic ''oficially'' transformed into the Roman Empire, but Augustus taking office was the ''de facto'' beginning of the Empire. They waited three centuries before dropping the pretense and admitting that Rome had become an absolute dictatorship.
30th Sep '15 10:18:27 PM mirisu92
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* All of these examples probably pale in comparison with the Philippines, where [[GenerationXerox two parent-and-child tandems have been President]] (Diosdado Macapagal and daughter Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo / Corazon "Cory" Aquino and son Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III), where the entire government is at the mercy of around [[UpToEleven 178 families]], where ''at least three in four'' members of Congress have other relatives sitting in office, and where some families have held power in the same province or city for almost a century if not more. The list of examples run from the Aquinos to the Arroyos to the Binays to the Marcoses … and so on ''ad infinitum''. In fact, if not for the need to pretend at democracy, all that's missing is a formal peerage system. ** Filipino Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has publicly called the Philippines "the political dynasty capital of the world". See the full list of dynasties [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines here.]] ''That'' is how bad it is.
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* All of these examples probably pale in comparison with the Philippines, where [[GenerationXerox two parent-and-child tandems have been President]] (Diosdado Macapagal and daughter Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo / Corazon "Cory" Aquino and son Benigno "Noynoy" Aquino III), where the entire government is at the mercy of around [[UpToEleven 178 families]], families]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines see the full list here]]), where ''at least three in four'' members of Congress have other relatives sitting in office, and where some families have held power in the same province or city for almost a century if not more. The list of examples run from the Aquinos to the Arroyos to the Binays to the Marcoses … and so on ''ad infinitum''. In fact, if not for the need to pretend at democracy, all that's missing is a formal peerage system. ** Filipino Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has publicly called the Philippines "the political dynasty capital of the world". See the full list of dynasties [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines here.]] ''That'' is how bad it is.
30th Sep '15 10:17:02 PM mirisu92
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** Filipino Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has publicly called the Philippines "the political dynasty capital of the world". ''That'' is how bad it is.
to:
** Filipino Senator Miriam Defensor-Santiago has publicly called the Philippines "the political dynasty capital of the world". See the full list of dynasties [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_political_families_in_the_Philippines here.]] ''That'' is how bad it is.
20th Sep '15 5:22:30 PM nombretomado
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* All the Stadholders of the Dutch Republic (1581-1795), while theoretically elected, were members of the House of Orange-Nassau and served for life. After the NapoleonicWars the Netherlands were made into an outright kingdom with Orange-Nassau as its royal house, which has remained on the throne up to this day.
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* All the Stadholders of the Dutch Republic (1581-1795), while theoretically elected, were members of the House of Orange-Nassau and served for life. After the NapoleonicWars UsefulNotes/TheNapoleonicWars the Netherlands were made into an outright kingdom with Orange-Nassau as its royal house, which has remained on the throne up to this day.
15th Aug '15 6:33:42 AM mirisu92
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* India has the Nehru–Gandhi family: Jawaharlal Nehru, his daughter Indira Gandhi, and her son Rajiv Gandhi have all been Prime Ministers of India (the latter two were both assassinated). Furthermore Rajiv's widow Sonia Gandhi is the current President of India's Congress Party, while their son Rahul is its General Secretary. Surprisingly, not related to UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi since Gandhi is a relatively commonplace surname in India, and Indira Gandhi's husband Feroze, who adopted his mother's last name of Gandhy, changing the spelling for that of the man himself to honor him (or to maximise political mileage, if you want to be cynical).
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* India has the Nehru–Gandhi family: Jawaharlal Nehru, his daughter Indira Gandhi, and her ''her'' son Rajiv Gandhi have all been Prime Ministers of India (the latter two were both assassinated). Furthermore Rajiv's widow Sonia Gandhi is the current President of India's Congress Party, while their son Rahul is its General Secretary. Surprisingly, not related to UsefulNotes/MahatmaGandhi since Gandhi is a relatively commonplace surname in India, and Indira Gandhi's husband Feroze, who adopted his mother's last name of Gandhy, changing the spelling for that of the man himself to honor him (or to maximise political mileage, if you want to be cynical).
15th Aug '15 6:32:17 AM mirisu92
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* All of these examples probably pale in comparison with the Philippines, where [[GenerationXerox two parent-and-child tandems have been President]] (Diosdado Macapagal and daughter Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo / Corazon "Cory" Aquino and son Benigno "Pnoy" Aquino III), where the entire government is at the mercy of around [[UpToEleven 178 families]], where ''at least three in four'' members of Congress have other relatives sitting in office, and where some families have held power in the same province or city for almost a century if not more. The list of examples run from the Aquinos to the Arroyos to the Binays to the Marcoses … and so on ''ad infinitum''. In fact, if not for the need to pretend at democracy, all that's missing is a formal peerage system.
to:
* All of these examples probably pale in comparison with the Philippines, where [[GenerationXerox two parent-and-child tandems have been President]] (Diosdado Macapagal and daughter Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo / Corazon "Cory" Aquino and son Benigno "Pnoy" "Noynoy" Aquino III), where the entire government is at the mercy of around [[UpToEleven 178 families]], where ''at least three in four'' members of Congress have other relatives sitting in office, and where some families have held power in the same province or city for almost a century if not more. The list of examples run from the Aquinos to the Arroyos to the Binays to the Marcoses … and so on ''ad infinitum''. In fact, if not for the need to pretend at democracy, all that's missing is a formal peerage system.

** Consider that a study was done on the effect of family pedigree on winnability at the elections. The results revealed that, other factors constant, any person is ''four times more likely'' to win an election if he or she has at least one other relative in office. [[FridgeHorror Make of that what you will.]]
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** Consider that a study was done on the effect of family pedigree on winnability at the elections. The results revealed that, other factors constant, any person candidate is ''four times more likely'' to win an election if he or she has at least one other relative in office. [[FridgeHorror [[NightmareFuel Make of that what you will.]]
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