History Main / HeirClubforMen

29th Oct '17 7:47:42 PM chopshop
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* Parodied in ''Series/GarthMarenghisDarkplace'', where [[PrimaDonnaDirector Garth]] at one point [[{{Wangst}} mopes and monologues]] about his wife "denying him an heir" by only having daughters before she went through menopause. Garth isn't royalty of any sort, just a mundane horror writer (and not an especially good one either); he's a rather pathetic bigot with a [[SmallNameBigEgo laughably overblown ego]], so he continues to subscribe to beliefs like this long after they died out, even when they wouldn't really apply to him anyways.
24th Oct '17 1:58:27 PM xcountryguy
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* In ''Manga/Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]

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* In ''Manga/Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When [[spoiler:When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]



* This is the only reason LipstickLesbian Margot Verger sleeps with Will Graham in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': the only way she could get control of her family's company is if she produced a male heir, otherwise it'd go to a church when her brother Mason dies. [[spoiler: When Mason finds out what she is planning, he arranges a car 'accident' to get her in an operating room and sterilizes her, aborting her child in the process. He...[[{{Understatement}} doesn't like Margot much.]]]]
** This doesn't stop Margot however since in season 3 [[spoiler: with Hannibal's help she gets hold of Mason's sperm and her wife Alana uses it to become pregnant and give birth to a son.]]

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* This is the only reason LipstickLesbian Margot Verger sleeps with Will Graham in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': the only way she could get control of her family's company is if she produced a male heir, otherwise it'd go to a church when her brother Mason dies. [[spoiler: When [[spoiler:When Mason finds out what she is planning, he arranges a car 'accident' to get her in an operating room and sterilizes her, aborting her child in the process. He...[[{{Understatement}} doesn't like Margot much.]]]]
** This doesn't stop Margot however since in season 3 [[spoiler: with [[spoiler:with Hannibal's help she gets hold of Mason's sperm and her wife Alana uses it to become pregnant and give birth to a son.]]



** Thomas Marik also recognized his illegitimate daughter Isis as a potential heir when his legitimate, male heir developed severe leukemia. While his son's [[spoiler: eventually terminal]] illness forced his hand, his reasons for keeping Isis illegitimate as long as possible had nothing to do with her gender.

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** Thomas Marik also recognized his illegitimate daughter Isis as a potential heir when his legitimate, male heir developed severe leukemia. While his son's [[spoiler: eventually [[spoiler:eventually terminal]] illness forced his hand, his reasons for keeping Isis illegitimate as long as possible had nothing to do with her gender.



** Averted in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening''. The countries of Ferox and Plegia do not have a dynastic line; Ferox has leaders based on strength and Plegia appears to have an elected monarchy [[spoiler: In Plegia Gangrel became king through trickery and Validar was a priest of the Grimaleal]]. Rosanne appears to be dynastic line, but the only character mentioned is the male Virion. Justified aversion in Ylisse. Emmeryn became Exalt because she was the eldest-- at the age of nine. Her younger brother Chrom does not ascend the throne when he is old enough, [[spoiler: he only does after she dies, and even if you do the Spotpass Paralogue that reveals she's still alive, she's [[TraumaInducedAmnesia no longer in a state where she can rule]]]]. Also averted and justified in the Future Past; only [[spoiler: Lucina]] can become Exalt because [[spoiler: only she can use the Falchion, to kill Grima]], and whether she has a younger brother or not never has any effect on plot.

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** Averted in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening''. The countries of Ferox and Plegia do not have a dynastic line; Ferox has leaders based on strength and Plegia appears to have an elected monarchy [[spoiler: In [[spoiler:In Plegia Gangrel became king through trickery and Validar was a priest of the Grimaleal]]. Rosanne appears to be dynastic line, but the only character mentioned is the male Virion. Justified aversion in Ylisse. Emmeryn became Exalt because she was the eldest-- at the age of nine. Her younger brother Chrom does not ascend the throne when he is old enough, [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he only does after she dies, and even if you do the Spotpass Paralogue that reveals she's still alive, she's [[TraumaInducedAmnesia no longer in a state where she can rule]]]]. Also averted and justified in the Future Past; only [[spoiler: Lucina]] [[spoiler:Lucina]] can become Exalt because [[spoiler: only [[spoiler:only she can use the Falchion, to kill Grima]], and whether she has a younger brother or not never has any effect on plot.
22nd Oct '17 10:49:14 AM nombretomado
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* As of 2011, UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealthOfNations has begun the process of changing to equal primogeniture[[note]]and also removing the bar on those who had married Catholics to succession to the throne; however, the requirement that the monarch be a Protestant has not been removed, as he or she will continue to be the Supreme Governor of the Church of England[[/note]] and the Prime Ministers of the Commonwealth Realms have all agreed in principle to the modification. However, as the Commonwealth monarchy is governed by separate but identical laws in all the Commonwealth Realms, the change requires parliamentary approval in all Realms save UsefulNotes/NewZealand and Papua New Guinea. Canada and Australia create further problems: it will require the approval of all ten [[CanadianPolitics provincial parliaments]] and all six [[UsefulNotes/AustralianPolitics state parliaments]], as well: the Canadian provinces and Australian states are legally distinct monarchies, so their separate but identical laws would also need to be changed. Some feared that Quebec might hold up the process as a means of getting long-desired concessions from Ottawa, particularly as that the sovereigntist Parti Quebecois was in power at the time the agreement was reached, but as it turns out the main hurdle in Canada has been court challenges over arcane points of Canadian constitutional law (and Canadian constitutional law can be ''incredibly'' arcane--it makes American constitutional law seem downright straightforward),[[note]]As of writing (March 2015) these challenges are still ongoing. The most likely to cause problems is that the Canadian federal government found what they think is a loophole they used to avoid the requirement that all ten provinces separately approve the change--a loophole they used primarily because they were afraid that Quebec would trip things up. While this is the most solid challenge legally, it has become politically irrelevant: Quebec kicked out the PQ quite resoundingly in April 2014, replaced by a Liberal government unlikely to use the monarchy as a bargaining chip.[[/note]] while the jurisdiction that has delayed passing the legislation the longest was Western Australia, which simply took a very long time in getting around to holding the vote (a senior WA MLA has basically admitted that their reason for the delay was "erm, we forgot").

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* As of 2011, UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealthOfNations has begun the process of changing to equal primogeniture[[note]]and also removing the bar on those who had married Catholics to succession to the throne; however, the requirement that the monarch be a Protestant has not been removed, as he or she will continue to be the Supreme Governor of the Church of England[[/note]] and the Prime Ministers of the Commonwealth Realms have all agreed in principle to the modification. However, as the Commonwealth monarchy is governed by separate but identical laws in all the Commonwealth Realms, the change requires parliamentary approval in all Realms save UsefulNotes/NewZealand and Papua New Guinea. Canada and Australia create further problems: it will require the approval of all ten [[CanadianPolitics [[UsefulNotes/CanadianPolitics provincial parliaments]] and all six [[UsefulNotes/AustralianPolitics state parliaments]], as well: the Canadian provinces and Australian states are legally distinct monarchies, so their separate but identical laws would also need to be changed. Some feared that Quebec might hold up the process as a means of getting long-desired concessions from Ottawa, particularly as that the sovereigntist Parti Quebecois was in power at the time the agreement was reached, but as it turns out the main hurdle in Canada has been court challenges over arcane points of Canadian constitutional law (and Canadian constitutional law can be ''incredibly'' arcane--it makes American constitutional law seem downright straightforward),[[note]]As of writing (March 2015) these challenges are still ongoing. The most likely to cause problems is that the Canadian federal government found what they think is a loophole they used to avoid the requirement that all ten provinces separately approve the change--a loophole they used primarily because they were afraid that Quebec would trip things up. While this is the most solid challenge legally, it has become politically irrelevant: Quebec kicked out the PQ quite resoundingly in April 2014, replaced by a Liberal government unlikely to use the monarchy as a bargaining chip.[[/note]] while the jurisdiction that has delayed passing the legislation the longest was Western Australia, which simply took a very long time in getting around to holding the vote (a senior WA MLA has basically admitted that their reason for the delay was "erm, we forgot").
6th Oct '17 12:22:20 PM animenutcase
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* Plays into the backstory of half-siblings Kakeru Manabe and Machi Kuragi in ''Manga/FruitsBasket''. Kakeru is both older and a boy, but he's the [[HeroisBastard son of a mistress]]. Machi is a legitimate child, but she's younger and a girl. Both women pushed their children to be perfect so as to be named heir. Kakeru's mother eased up when he rebelled, but Machi's only let up after giving birth to a son. Not only does she refuse to [[NeverMyFault acknowledge]] that it's her fault her daughter is "dull", but she and her husband kick her out when they catch her trying to cover her brother with a blanket, assuming she was trying to smother him to death.

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* Plays into the backstory of half-siblings Kakeru Manabe and Machi Kuragi in ''Manga/FruitsBasket''. Kakeru is both older and a boy, but he's the [[HeroisBastard [[HeroicBastard son of a mistress]]. Machi is a legitimate child, but she's younger and a girl. Both women pushed their children to be perfect so as to be named heir. Kakeru's mother eased up when he rebelled, but Machi's only let up after giving birth to a son. Not only does she refuse to [[NeverMyFault acknowledge]] that it's her fault her daughter is "dull", but she and her husband kick her out when they catch her trying to cover her brother with a blanket, assuming she was trying to smother him to death.
6th Oct '17 12:21:44 PM animenutcase
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Added DiffLines:

* Plays into the backstory of half-siblings Kakeru Manabe and Machi Kuragi in ''Manga/FruitsBasket''. Kakeru is both older and a boy, but he's the [[HeroisBastard son of a mistress]]. Machi is a legitimate child, but she's younger and a girl. Both women pushed their children to be perfect so as to be named heir. Kakeru's mother eased up when he rebelled, but Machi's only let up after giving birth to a son. Not only does she refuse to [[NeverMyFault acknowledge]] that it's her fault her daughter is "dull", but she and her husband kick her out when they catch her trying to cover her brother with a blanket, assuming she was trying to smother him to death.
21st Sep '17 8:50:18 PM Luzhell
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* Parodied in [[http://www.theonion.com/content/news/clinton_chastises_hillary_for this article]] in ''Website/TheOnion''. This is HilariousInHindsight now that Hillary herself is (barring health problems) considered the Democratic frontrunner to succeed UsefulNotes/BarackObama in 2016 (to say nothing of her run in 2008) and may be positioning herself to run as "President Grandma."

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* Parodied in [[http://www.theonion.com/content/news/clinton_chastises_hillary_for this article]] in ''Website/TheOnion''. This is HilariousInHindsight now that Hillary herself is (barring health problems) considered the Democratic frontrunner to succeed UsefulNotes/BarackObama in 2016 (to say nothing of her run in 2008) and may be positioning herself to run as "President Grandma."
9th Sep '17 7:40:55 PM Clanger00
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** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother. The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does not apply retroactively; what this means, as a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child to be affected by the law, Prince George, would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father (or abdicates), nothing has changed.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]
*** None of the British monarchs since 1910 (George V, Edward VIII, George VI, Elizabeth II, and the future (presumably) Charles III, William V, and George VII) would have been or would be affected by the change. You have to go back to 1841 when the future Edward VII was born a year after his older sister supplanting her as heir to Queen Victoria.

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** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother.
**
The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does but would not apply retroactively; what this means, as make a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child difference to be affected by the law, current succession as Prince George, the first royal child born after the law change, is the oldest child and thus would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father (or abdicates), nothing has changed.laws.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]
*** None
[[/note]] In fact, none of the British monarchs since 1910 (George V, Edward VIII, George VI, Elizabeth II, and the future (presumably) Charles III, William V, and George VII) would have been or would be affected by the change. You have to go back to 1841 when the future Edward VII was born a year after his older sister supplanting her as heir to Queen Victoria.
9th Sep '17 7:02:06 PM Clanger00
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The distinction is less clear than you might then. It's rarely the case that there are ''no'' male claimants, however, so if there's no ''clear'' heir then a SuccessionCrisis often results. The threat of such a crisis is reason enough for kings of countries with these laws to go to great lengths to ensure that they have at least one son on the ground who is both legitimate and his official heir.

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The distinction is less clear than you might then. think. It's rarely the case that there are ''no'' male claimants, however, so if there's no ''clear'' heir (the king has no sons, but does have brothers and uncles) then a SuccessionCrisis often results. The threat of such a crisis is reason enough for kings of countries with these laws to go to great lengths to ensure that they have at least one son on the ground who is both legitimate and his official heir.
3rd Sep '17 9:34:11 PM SSJMagus
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** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother. The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does not apply retroactively; what this means, as a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child to be affected by the law, Prince George, would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father, nothing has changed.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]

to:

** Seven European countries have done away with this altogether: Sweden, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Belgium, Denmark, and the United Kingdom. In other words, these countries provide that a woman can inherit the throne even if she has younger brothers (sometimes known as "absolute primogeniture"). The first of these changes was passed in Sweden effective January 1, 1980, and so far no woman has actually inherited a crown via absolute primogeniture; Sweden's Crown Princess Victoria is likely to eventually become the first woman in the modern world to inherit a crown despite having a living brother. The British example is, as usual, a little bit odd, in that it was only passed in 2013 and does not apply retroactively; what this means, as a practical matter, is that nothing has seriously changed, since first child to be affected by the law, Prince George, would've had the same place in the succession under the old laws (being the eldest son as well as the eldest child); unless he (God forbid) predeceases his father, father (or abdicates), nothing has changed.[[note]]Bear in mind that the [[UsefulNotes/TheCommonwealth Commonwealth Realms]] put a substantial wrinkle in this; see below for details.[[/note]]
30th Jul '17 12:50:29 PM Anderling
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* '''Agnatic-Cognatic Succession''': Women may inherit if there are no suitable make heir.

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* '''Agnatic-Cognatic Succession''': Women may inherit if there are is no suitable make male heir.
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