History Main / HeirClubforMen

17th May '17 5:14:52 AM Clare
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* ''Literature/EarthsChildren'': Justified in-universe The Clan of the Cave Bear''. Since Clan women are inherently incapable of leadership, each clan is led by a man who invariably passes the leadership on to another male. The new leader is traditionally the oldest son of the previous leader, though there are exceptions. For example, Creb is the oldest son of a leader, but, because he is crippled and therefore unable to truly become a man in the eyes of the Clan, he has instead become his clan's Mog-ur (shaman), while his younger brother, Brun, is leader of the clan.

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* ''Literature/EarthsChildren'': Justified in-universe The in ''The Clan of the Cave Bear''. Since Clan women are inherently incapable of leadership, each clan is led by a man who invariably passes the leadership on to another male. The new leader is traditionally the oldest son of the previous leader, though there are exceptions. For example, Creb is the oldest son of a leader, but, because he is crippled and therefore unable to truly become a man in the eyes of the Clan, he has instead become his clan's Mog-ur (shaman), while his younger brother, Brun, is leader of the clan.
4th May '17 3:20:32 PM AthenaBlue
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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Animated]]



[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
* In ''Film/PansLabyrinth'', Captain Vidal is determined to have a male heir no matter the cost to his wife or his stepdaughter.
* The fact that only males can inherit the throne in ''Film/{{Stardust}}'' means that Princess Una isn't a target of her other brothers, who are busy killing each other off because the law also demands that there be only one male contender. It helps they have no idea where she is.

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[[folder:Films [[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]
* In ''Film/PansLabyrinth'', Captain Vidal is determined to have a male heir no matter the cost to his wife or his stepdaughter.
* The fact that only males can inherit the throne in ''Film/{{Stardust}}'' means that Princess Una isn't a target of her other brothers, who are busy killing each other off because the law also demands that there be only one male contender. It helps they have no idea where she is.
Live-Action]]



* Possible examples in ''Film/TheThiefOfBagdad''; Jaffar's stated reason for asking for the hand of the princess of Basra is that he wants to start a dynasty. The sultan of Basra then says, "I tried that once, and what have I got? A daughter!" (Of course, Jaffar ''is'' a usurper, for whom having a marriage and heir with royal blood would probably be a bit more important.)
* Frederich is shown praying desperately for a son in ''Film/SnowWhiteATaleOfTerror''. It seems to be the only reason he married Claudia as he is still in love with his dead wife. Claudia, who admitted to her mirror that she really loved him, is not happy when she realizes this.



* ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'': The deleted scene where the contents of Baron Frankenstein's will were revealed: On his will, Baron Frankenstein described Frederick as his only ''male'' heir and never considered leaving anything to his granddaughter.



* In ''Film/PansLabyrinth'', Captain Vidal is determined to have a male heir no matter the cost to his wife or his stepdaughter.
* Frederich is shown praying desperately for a son in ''Film/SnowWhiteATaleOfTerror''. It seems to be the only reason he married Claudia as he is still in love with his dead wife. Claudia, who admitted to her mirror that she really loved him, is not happy when she realizes this.
* The fact that only males can inherit the throne in ''Film/{{Stardust}}'' means that Princess Una isn't a target of her other brothers, who are busy killing each other off because the law also demands that there be only one male contender. It helps they have no idea where she is.
* Possible examples in ''Film/TheThiefOfBagdad''; Jaffar's stated reason for asking for the hand of the princess of Basra is that he wants to start a dynasty. The sultan of Basra then says, "I tried that once, and what have I got? A daughter!" (Of course, Jaffar ''is'' a usurper, for whom having a marriage and heir with royal blood would probably be a bit more important.)



* ''Film/YoungFrankenstein'': The deleted scene where the contents of Baron Frankenstein's will were revealed: On his will, Baron Frankenstein described Frederick as his only ''male'' heir and never considered leaving anything to his granddaughter.



* Downplayed in ''Literature/TheWitchlands'' -- Vivia is the heir to the Nubrevnan throne despite having a younger brother, but the Council gives her a lot of grief for being a woman and it's quite obvious that they'd rather marry her off to have a man on the throne or somehow get Merik to be the king. Vivia also notes that while there's no formal rule about the gender of the Council memebers, all women eligible for a seat end up sending a male relative in their stead. [[spoiler:At least until the end of the second book.]]

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* Downplayed in ''Literature/TheWitchlands'' -- Vivia is the heir to the Nubrevnan throne despite having a younger brother, but the Council gives her a lot of grief for being a woman and it's quite obvious that they'd rather marry her off to have a man on the throne or somehow get Merik to be the king. Vivia also notes that while there's no formal rule about the gender of the Council memebers, members, all women eligible for a seat end up sending a male relative in their stead. [[spoiler:At least until the end of the second book.]]



* ''Series/TheAdventuresOfShirleyHolmes'': As revealed in the intro, Literature/SherlockHolmes expected a "young ''man''" to solve his puzzle. Shirley didn't seem to mind.
** In [[spoiler:"The Case of the Rising Moon", a Princess was being targeted because some of her subjects didn't like the idea of a woman being their ruler]].
* ''Series/{{Attila}}'': Emperor Valentinian sits on the Roman throne despite being something of a halfwit controlled by an EvilMatriarch. His much brighter sister Honoria laments the fact that she can't rule because she's a woman and later attempts to [[TheStarscream overthrow him]] in a failed plot.
* Parodied on ''Series/TheDailyShow'' after newscasters started congratulating Kate Middleton on giving birth specifically to a boy as though this is an achievement, and preferable to giving birth to a girl, as opposed to a near fifty-fifty shot with no way to influence the process.
--> '''John Oliver:''' What would your response have been if it had been a girl? "Damnation upon your cursed womb, Catherine! Burn the princess, for she hath produced a baby of the weaker sex! Burn the princess! Burn them both! Burn them!"
* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' has a plot related to the entail of the estate, which is a similar issue to the situation in ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' whereby the daughters cannot inherit and the male heir is somewhat distant to the family (he's the Earl's fifth cousin). Fortunately, the heir-presumptive is a young bachelor of an age where he could marry one of the current Earl's daughters -- particularly the eldest, Lady Mary -- and keep the property and title in the family. [[spoiler:He does -- marrying Mary (who, as it turns out, is [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage perfect for him]]) and producing an heir -- but there's a lot of drama before they get there.]] Previously, Mary was set to marry another cousin, who was to be the heir. Then [[spoiler:the ''Titanic'' sunk with him on board, although a later episode reveals he may have survived]].
* A subversion occurs in ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. The crew lands on a Sebacean breakaway colony where succession goes to the eldest child regardless of gender, but the law states that a husband and wife must rule together. As such, the princess cannot become empress unless she finds a male who can give her children before she reaches a certain birthday (and, due to some gene poisoning by her brother, only Crichton fits the bill).
* The episode "Heart of Gold" of ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' has Burgess, a man who knocked up a whore and wants the child, as it is male, for an heir. And he didn't do it accidentally; rather, Burgess' wife is implied to be infertile and when he receives the news that it's a boy, his wife is present and appears to be as relieved as Burgess is.



* An episode of ''Series/TheWestWing'' features a muck-raking and inaccurate 'expose' memoir from a former staffer fired for incompetence which, amongst other things, alleges that the President wore special undergarments in order to produce a male heir when conceiving the child that ended up being his youngest daughter. The President is bemused, to say the least.
* The episode "Heart of Gold" of ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' has Burgess, a man who knocked up a whore and wants the child, as it is male, for an heir. And he didn't do it accidentally; rather, Burgess' wife is implied to be infertile and when he receives the news that it's a boy, his wife is present and appears to be as relieved as Burgess is.
* ''Series/TheTudors'' has this in spades, not surprisingly considering that it's a show about UsefulNotes/HenryVIII.

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* An This is the only reason LipstickLesbian Margot Verger sleeps with Will Graham in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': the only way she could get control of her family's company is if she produced a male heir, otherwise it'd go to a church when her brother Mason dies. [[spoiler: When Mason finds out what she is planning, he arranges a car 'accident' to get her in an operating room and sterilizes her, aborting her child in the process. He...[[{{Understatement}} doesn't like Margot much.]]]]
** This doesn't stop Margot however since in season 3 [[spoiler: with Hannibal's help she gets hold of Mason's sperm and her wife Alana uses it to become pregnant and give birth to a son.]]
* ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'': When Uther couldn't get an heir, he turned to magic, and it gave him one, but cost him the life of his queen, Ygraine.
* The ''Series/{{NCIS}}''
episode of ''Series/TheWestWing'' "Newborn King" features a muck-raking and inaccurate 'expose' memoir Marine who was sent home after she got pregnant from a former staffer fired for incompetence which, amongst other things, alleges that the President wore special undergarments in order to produce fling with a male heir when conceiving the child that ended up being his youngest daughter. soldier from Afghanistan. The President is bemused, to say the least.
* The episode "Heart of Gold" of ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' has Burgess, a man who knocked up a whore and wants the child, as it is male, for an heir. And he didn't do it accidentally; rather, Burgess' wife is implied
father turned out to be infertile the only heir to a tribe that owned a valuable piece of land, and when he receives the news died, his family became ''very'' interested in getting their hands on that it's baby, sending a boy, trio of Russian mercenaries after the Marine. [[spoiler:It all ends up for naught, as not only does Team Gibbs subdue the mercenaries, but the Marine gives birth to a girl, who is ineligible to inherit.]]
* ''Series/ThePalace'' featured a haughty princess scheming to dethrone her younger brother by destroying
his wife is present and appears to reputation. (There was also another brother in line before her, but getting rid of him would be as relieved as Burgess is.
* ''Series/TheTudors'' has this
a [[RoyalBrat piece of cake]] -- assuming the public [[TheWrongfulHeirToTheThrone even let him become king]] in spades, not surprisingly considering that it's a show about UsefulNotes/HenryVIII.the first place.)



* ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' has a plot related to the entail of the estate, which is a similar issue to the situation in ''Literature/PrideAndPrejudice'' whereby the daughters cannot inherit and the male heir is somewhat distant to the family (he's the Earl's fifth cousin). Fortunately, the heir-presumptive is a young bachelor of an age where he could marry one of the current Earl's daughters -- particularly the eldest, Lady Mary -- and keep the property and title in the family. [[spoiler:He does -- marrying Mary (who, as it turns out, is [[PerfectlyArrangedMarriage perfect for him]]) and producing an heir -- but there's a lot of drama before they get there.]] Previously, Mary was set to marry another cousin, who was to be the heir. Then [[spoiler:the ''Titanic'' sunk with him on board, although a later episode reveals he may have survived]].
* ''Series/ThePalace'' featured a haughty princess scheming to dethrone her younger brother by destroying his reputation. (There was also another brother in line before her, but getting rid of him would be a [[RoyalBrat piece of cake]] -- assuming the public [[TheWrongfulHeirToTheThrone even let him become king]] in the first place.)
* ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'': When Uther couldn't get an heir, he turned to magic, and it gave him one, but cost him the life of his queen, Ygraine.
* The ''Series/{{NCIS}}'' episode "Newborn King" features a Marine who was sent home after she got pregnant from a fling with a soldier from Afghanistan. The father turned out to be the only heir to a tribe that owned a valuable piece of land, and when he died, his family became ''very'' interested in getting their hands on that baby, sending a trio of Russian mercenaries after the Marine. [[spoiler:It all ends up for naught, as not only does Team Gibbs subdue the mercenaries, but the Marine gives birth to a girl, who is ineligible to inherit.]]



* A subversion occurs in ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. The crew lands on a Sebacean breakaway colony where succession goes to the eldest child regardless of gender, but the law states that a husband and wife must rule together. As such, the princess cannot become empress unless she finds a male who can give her children before she reaches a certain birthday (and, due to some gene poisoning by her brother, only Crichton fits the bill.)
* Parodied on ''Series/TheDailyShow'' after newscasters started congratulating Kate Middleton on giving birth specifically to a boy as though this is an achievement, and preferable to giving birth to a girl, as opposed to a near fifty-fifty shot with no way to influence the process.
--> '''John Oliver:''' What would your response have been if it had been a girl? "Damnation upon your cursed womb, Catherine! Burn the princess, for she hath produced a baby of the weaker sex! Burn the princess! Burn them both! Burn them!"
* ''Series/TheAdventuresOfShirleyHolmes'': As revealed in the intro, Literature/SherlockHolmes expected a "young ''man''" to solve his puzzle. Shirley didn't seem to mind.
** In [[spoiler:"The Case of the Rising Moon", a Princess was being targeted because some of her subjects didn't like the idea of a woman being their ruler]].
* This is the only reason LipstickLesbian Margot Verger sleeps with Will Graham in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': the only way she could get control of her family's company is if she produced a male heir, otherwise it'd go to a church when her brother Mason dies. [[spoiler: When Mason finds out what she is planning, he arranges a car 'accident' to get her in an operating room and sterilizes her, aborting her child in the process. He...[[{{Understatement}} doesn't like Margot much.]]]]
** This doesn't stop Margot however since in season 3 [[spoiler: with Hannibal's help she gets hold of Mason's sperm and her wife Alana uses it to become pregnant and give birth to a son.]]
* ''Series/{{Attila}}'': Emperor Valentinian sits on the Roman throne despite being something of a halfwit controlled by an EvilMatriarch. His much brighter sister Honoria laments the fact that she can't rule because she's a woman and later attempts to [[TheStarscream overthrow him]] in a failed plot.

to:

* A subversion occurs ''Series/TheTudors'' has this in ''Series/{{Farscape}}''. The crew lands on a Sebacean breakaway colony where succession goes to the eldest child regardless of gender, but the law states spades, not surprising considering that it's a husband show about UsefulNotes/HenryVIII.
* An episode of ''Series/TheWestWing'' features a muck-raking
and wife must rule together. As such, inaccurate "exposé" memoir from a former staffer fired for incompetence which, amongst other things, alleges that the princess cannot become empress unless she finds President wore special undergarments in order to produce a male who can give her children before she reaches a certain birthday (and, due to some gene poisoning by her brother, only Crichton fits heir when conceiving the bill.)
* Parodied on ''Series/TheDailyShow'' after newscasters started congratulating Kate Middleton on giving birth specifically to a boy as though this is an achievement, and preferable to giving birth to a girl, as opposed to a near fifty-fifty shot with no way to influence the process.
--> '''John Oliver:''' What would your response have been if it had been a girl? "Damnation upon your cursed womb, Catherine! Burn the princess, for she hath produced a baby of the weaker sex! Burn the princess! Burn them both! Burn them!"
* ''Series/TheAdventuresOfShirleyHolmes'': As revealed in the intro, Literature/SherlockHolmes expected a "young ''man''" to solve his puzzle. Shirley didn't seem to mind.
** In [[spoiler:"The Case of the Rising Moon", a Princess was
child that ended up being targeted because some of her subjects didn't like his youngest daughter. The President is bemused, to say the idea of a woman being their ruler]].
* This is the only reason LipstickLesbian Margot Verger sleeps with Will Graham in ''Series/{{Hannibal}}'': the only way she could get control of her family's company is if she produced a male heir, otherwise it'd go to a church when her brother Mason dies. [[spoiler: When Mason finds out what she is planning, he arranges a car 'accident' to get her in an operating room and sterilizes her, aborting her child in the process. He...[[{{Understatement}} doesn't like Margot much.]]]]
** This doesn't stop Margot however since in season 3 [[spoiler: with Hannibal's help she gets hold of Mason's sperm and her wife Alana uses it to become pregnant and give birth to a son.]]
* ''Series/{{Attila}}'': Emperor Valentinian sits on the Roman throne despite being something of a halfwit controlled by an EvilMatriarch. His much brighter sister Honoria laments the fact that she can't rule because she's a woman and later attempts to [[TheStarscream overthrow him]] in a failed plot.
least.
26th Apr '17 10:11:13 PM valar55
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* In ''Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]

to:

* In ''Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', ''Anime/Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]
26th Apr '17 10:10:34 PM valar55
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* In ''Acca: 13 District Inspection Department'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]

to:

* In ''Acca: 13 District Inspection Department'', ''Acca13TerritoryInspectionDept'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]
10th Apr '17 3:21:14 PM AthenaBlue
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* Notably averted in ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', by the fact that all sisters of a family rule together, and their daughters are all considered heirs to the throne. Men presumably cannot inherit the throne, but as boys are so rare that a family with four boys out of thirty-two children is considered lucky, this is not a problem that is likely to ever present itself.

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* Notably averted ''Literature/TheAscendantKingdomsSaga'': It's discovered in ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', by the fact first book, ''Ice Forged'', that a long-ago ruler, King Hougen, anchored humanity's control of magic to the bloodlines of himself and twelve of his followers, anchors that are ''only'' passed along the lines of firstborn sons. [[DeconstructedTrope Because of this]], over half the anchoring bloodlines, including that of Hougen himself, ended even ''before'' a FantasticNuke attack kills off almost all sisters of a family rule together, Donderath's noble houses and their brings on [[ApocalypseHow the collapse of human civilization across the Continent]]. This leaves protagonist Blaine [=McFadden=], who was exiled for murder at the start of the series, as the last surviving Lord of the Blood and therefore the only one able to re-anchor magic.[[note]]Technically one of the others survives, but he's a wraith so he doesn't count as far as the magic is concerned.[[/note]]
* ''Literature/AssassinFantastic'': In ''Coin of the Realm'', Princess Rosalind's father had six
daughters are all considered heirs to before finally getting the throne. Men presumably cannot inherit son he wanted to succeed him. He regards his daughters as nothing more than "coin to be traded", with no more value than whatever he can get for marrying them off. This, naturally, doesn't sit well with Rosalind at all.
* ''Literature/TheAssassinsOfTamurin'': The success of Makina Seval's plot hinges on her adopted daughter Ashken having a male heir with Ardavan. Nilang assures Lale she has a contingency plan -- if Ashken's first child should happen to be female, she will quickly be SwitchedAtBirth with a male child before anyone is
the throne, but as boys are so rare wiser.
* In ''[[Literature/AuntDimity Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince]]'', Tappan Hall actually belongs to Lady Barbara Booker's great-nephew due to an entail. Even so, he declines to be addressed by the title "Lord" while she's still alive, insisting
that a family with four boys out of thirty-two children is considered lucky, this is not a problem that is likely to ever present itself. she should rightfully have it.



* Notably averted in ''Literature/ABrothersPrice'', by the fact that all sisters of a family rule together, and their daughters are all considered heirs to the throne. Men presumably cannot inherit the throne, but as boys are so rare that a family with four boys out of thirty-two children is considered lucky, this is not a problem that is likely to ever present itself.
* In ''Literature/TheCastleOfOtranto'', a nobleman's sole male heir is mysteriously killed, and he immediately begins making plans to marry his late son's fiancée, annulling his current marriage and consigning his wife and daughter to ruin. Played with, in that he acts this way because he fears that failure to produce another son will bring an ancestral curse down on him, not because he actually cares about his bloodline's future.
* Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TheChroniclesOfNarnia'': In ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'', it is when the usurping EvilUncle finally gets a male heir that jump-starts the plot and gets Prince Caspian moving. Fast.



* In Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TillWeHaveFaces'', the king of Glome wants a male heir and gets three daughters. His anger about this is the source of much tension in his family and the court. In the end, his oldest daughter seizes, and holds, the throne after his death.
* ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'': The kingdom of Númenor had a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primogeniture#Agnatic_primogeniture Agnatic Primogeniture]] law applied to its line of Kings. Tar-Aldarion, having no male heirs and having only a daughter, changed the Law of Succession, replacing the principle of agnatic primogeniture with that of fully equal primogeniture and she (as Tar-Ancalimë) became the first Ruling Queen of Númenor. Afterwards, the oldest child inherited the throne whether they were male or female.\\
\\
His legal changes were largely undone in practice, however, as only two other queens claimed the throne in the next 16 generations. The odds of this happening by pure chance are ''extremely'' low, assuming male and female royal offspring were equally likely to be born and survive to inherit.

to:

* In Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TillWeHaveFaces'', Creator/RobertEHoward's stories of Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian after he became king, several times it is a plot point that Conan's death creates a problem, as he has no son. Oddly enough, we never see any pressure on him to marry and have one, though in other stories he does eventually get married and have a son.
* In Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion'', Roya Orico grasped that
the king [[spoiler:titular curse]] lay with him and convinced his Royina to secretly lie with his (evil) Chancellor (who was at least polite about it) and said Chancellor's even more evil brother (who was not). When that plan proved unsuccessful (and Royina Sara threatened to kill herself), he summoned his much younger half brother Teidez to court along with his sister Iselle. [[spoiler:Bujold eventually subverts it when Iselle (the bright one to begin with) is left the last of Glome wants Fonsa's line alive when the titular curse is finally broken.]]
* ''Literature/TheDalemarkQuartet'': This is how Dagner [[UnexpectedSuccessor winds up]] Earl of the South Dales -- his mother is the niece of
a previous Earl, and every other male heir and gets three daughters. His anger about was killed during an attempted invasion of the North when his younger brother Moril used MagicMusic to close the pass, leaving him the heir. Kialan finds this hilarious. Dagner himself would rather be a [[WanderingMinstrel Singer]].
* In ''Literature/DarkOnesMistress'',
this is the source of much tension in his family and the court. In the end, his oldest daughter seizes, and holds, the throne after his death.
* ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'': The kingdom of Númenor had a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primogeniture#Agnatic_primogeniture Agnatic Primogeniture]] law applied to its line of Kings. Tar-Aldarion, having no male heirs and having only a daughter, changed the Law of Succession, replacing the principle of agnatic primogeniture
main reason Clara, along with that of fully equal primogeniture and she (as Tar-Ancalimë) became four other women, was kidnapped in the first Ruling Queen of Númenor. Afterwards, place.
* ''Literature/{{Darkover}}'' is obsessed with this trope and wanting sons, though with several exceptions. The Aillard line is matriarchal and matrilineal, and Renunciates are forbidden from playing
the oldest child inherited the throne whether game; they were male or female.\\
\\
His legal changes were largely undone in practice, however, as only two other queens claimed the throne in the next 16 generations. The odds of this happening by pure chance are ''extremely'' low, assuming male and female
must vow to never make a traditional royal offspring were equally likely to be born marriage or become a concubine, and survive "to bear children only in [their] own time and season," not for their family's ambitions. This is justified because [[PsychicPowers laran]] is determined [[SuperpowerfulGenetics genetically]].
* A particularly ironic {{lampshade|Hanging}} is placed on Rhys in Katharine Kerr's {{Literature/Deverry}} Cycle, when he puts aside his wife for being infertile ... and she remarries and is immediately knocked up by her new husband, much
to inherit.the amusement of everyone involved, except Rhys. A much less amusing example in one of the flashback story arcs involved a king who had three daughters and no sons. When he died the fathers of his grandsons each declared that their firstborn son was the rightful king (And that the father of the 'rightful' king was naturally his regent until the king became of age). This kicked off a century long SuccessionCrisis known as the Time of Troubles.



* In Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'', it is when the usurping EvilUncle finally gets a male heir that jump-starts the plot and gets Prince Caspian moving. Fast.
* Inverted in Robert Jordan's ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime''. Andor is always ruled by a queen, and it's said that no man has ever survived sitting on the Lion Throne. Every so often there are minor "[[SuccessionCrisis wars of succession]]" because it's unclear which woman is next in line.
* ''Literature/TheAssassinsOfTamurin'': The success of Makina Seval's plot hinges on her adopted daughter Ashken having a male heir with Ardavan. Nilang assures Lale she has a contingency plan -- if Ashken's first child should happen to be female, she will quickly be SwitchedAtBirth with a male child before anyone is the wiser.
* In Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion'', Roya Orico grasped that the [[spoiler:titular curse]] lay with him and convinced his Royina to secretly lie with his (evil) Chancellor (who was at least polite about it) and said Chancellor's even more evil brother (who was not). When that plan proved unsuccessful (and Royina Sara threatened to kill herself), he summoned his much younger half brother Teidez to court along with his sister Iselle. [[spoiler:Bujold eventually subverts it when Iselle (the bright one to begin with) is left the last of Fonsa's line alive when the titular curse is finally broken.]]
* In the first book of Melanie Rawn's ''Sunrunner'' series, ''Literature/DragonPrince'', the realm is in an incredibly fragile political situation due solely to the fact High Prince Roelstra has ''seventeen'' daughters, yet no male heir; like Henry VIII in real life, Roelstra has put aside wife after wife, and his daughters (legitimate and illegitimate) are both opportun''ists'' and opportun''ities'', politically. One of the book's key intrigues rests on ensuring (via an elaborate deception) that Roelstra's fourth and current wife bears -- or ''appears'' to bear -- a son.
* Creator/AndreNorton examples:
** ''[[Literature/WitchWorld The Jargoon Pard]]'': Lady Heroise is determined to bear a son she can mold into her puppet and so rule Car do Prawn. Unfortunately her child is a daughter. Luckily the expectant couple in the next room has [[SwitchedAtBirth just delivered a son]]. But unbeknownst to Heroise the father just happens to be her own long lost half-brother....!
** ''The Crystal Gryphon'' and the prequel short story "Of the Shaping of Ulm's Heir" are begun by this trope. Lord Ulric of Ulmsdale had been unable to father any living children, so he divorced his second wife and married the widowed Lady Tephana because she was of proven fertility, having a son from a previous marriage. This led to a great deal of trouble starting at the end of the short story and picking up at the beginning of the novel, when Lady Tephana utterly rejected her son by Ulric - Kerovan - and settled down to scheming on behalf of her first-marriage son and later her daughter by Ulric. (The latter could inherit if Kerovan died or was publicly rejected as being unqualified to rule, e.g. because of mental or physical infirmity).
** Joisan, the female lead of ''The Crystal Gryphon'' is involved in another potential SuccessionCrisis. Her paternal uncle, the lord of Ithdale, has no children but two potential heirs: Joisan (his half-brother's only child) and his younger sister's son, Toross. Although Joisan has been in an ArrangedMarriage since early childhood, Toross's mother keeps trying to throw her together with Toross in the hopes of securing the succession for him. And Toross goes along with it because [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend he's genuinely in love with Joisan]].
** In ''Literature/IceCrown'', downplayed; Princess Ludorica says her grandfather would have preferred a prince, but has used her.
** Downplayed still more in ''Literature/TheZeroStone'', where the only effect is that Jern's father tried to teach him and his brother but not their sister.
* In Creator/PiersAnthony's ''Literature/ASpellForChameleon'', the Magician Trent must marry the Sorceress Iris in order to remain in Literature/{{Xanth}}; this condition is set because only Magicians can rule in Xanth, and in hopes that their powers will ensure that they have a Magician son. In ''The Source of Magic'', the widowed Trent has difficulty ensuring an heir because he's still in love with his first wife; they do succeed, in time, in having a child, but a daughter. Finally, in ''Night Mare'', when Magicians are being removed as soon as they are King, during an invasion, LoopholeAbuse is invoked: the laws of Literature/{{Xanth}} forbid a ruling queen, but [[SheIsTheKing do not explicitly require that kings be male]]. Sorceresses, both Iris and her daughter, ascend the throne as Kings.
* The entire plot of the ''Literature/MerryGentry'' series is TheFairFolk being mostly infertile, and whether Prince Cel or Merry can deliver an heir first.
* The ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series:
** The House of Rahl takes it a step further: Not only must they have a male heir, but the heir must have the magical gift. More recent generations (particularly Darken Rahl) took to killing any female and/or non-gifted children.
** Inverted in the case of the Confessors. Any ''male'' child of a Confessor had to be killed because they invariably ended up abusing their power.

to:

* In Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'', it is when ''Literature/EarthsChildren'': Justified in-universe The Clan of the usurping EvilUncle finally gets a male heir that jump-starts the plot and gets Prince Caspian moving. Fast.
* Inverted in Robert Jordan's ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime''. Andor
Cave Bear''. Since Clan women are inherently incapable of leadership, each clan is always ruled led by a queen, and it's said that no man has ever survived sitting on who invariably passes the Lion Throne. Every so often leadership on to another male. The new leader is traditionally the oldest son of the previous leader, though there are minor "[[SuccessionCrisis wars exceptions. For example, Creb is the oldest son of succession]]" a leader, but, because it's unclear which woman he is next in line.
* ''Literature/TheAssassinsOfTamurin'': The success of Makina Seval's plot hinges on her adopted daughter Ashken having a male heir with Ardavan. Nilang assures Lale she has a contingency plan -- if Ashken's first child should happen to be female, she will quickly be SwitchedAtBirth with a male child before anyone is the wiser.
* In Creator/LoisMcMasterBujold's ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion'', Roya Orico grasped that the [[spoiler:titular curse]] lay with him
crippled and convinced his Royina to secretly lie with his (evil) Chancellor (who was at least polite about it) and said Chancellor's even more evil brother (who was not). When that plan proved unsuccessful (and Royina Sara threatened to kill herself), he summoned his much younger half brother Teidez to court along with his sister Iselle. [[spoiler:Bujold eventually subverts it when Iselle (the bright one to begin with) is left the last of Fonsa's line alive when the titular curse is finally broken.]]
* In the first book of Melanie Rawn's ''Sunrunner'' series, ''Literature/DragonPrince'', the realm is in an incredibly fragile political situation due solely to the fact High Prince Roelstra has ''seventeen'' daughters, yet no male heir; like Henry VIII in real life, Roelstra has put aside wife after wife, and his daughters (legitimate and illegitimate) are both opportun''ists'' and opportun''ities'', politically. One of the book's key intrigues rests on ensuring (via an elaborate deception) that Roelstra's fourth and current wife bears -- or ''appears'' to bear -- a son.
* Creator/AndreNorton examples:
** ''[[Literature/WitchWorld The Jargoon Pard]]'': Lady Heroise is determined to bear a son she can mold into her puppet and so rule Car do Prawn. Unfortunately her child is a daughter. Luckily the expectant couple in the next room has [[SwitchedAtBirth just delivered a son]]. But unbeknownst to Heroise the father just happens to be her own long lost half-brother....!
** ''The Crystal Gryphon'' and the prequel short story "Of the Shaping of Ulm's Heir" are begun by this trope. Lord Ulric of Ulmsdale had been
therefore unable to father any living children, so he divorced his second wife and married truly become a man in the widowed Lady Tephana because she was of proven fertility, having a son from a previous marriage. This led to a great deal of trouble starting at the end eyes of the short story and picking up at the beginning of the novel, when Lady Tephana utterly rejected her son by Ulric - Kerovan - and settled down to scheming on behalf of her first-marriage son and later her daughter by Ulric. (The latter could inherit if Kerovan died or was publicly rejected as being unqualified to rule, e.g. because of mental or physical infirmity).
** Joisan, the female lead of ''The Crystal Gryphon'' is involved in another potential SuccessionCrisis. Her paternal uncle, the lord of Ithdale,
Clan, he has no children but two potential heirs: Joisan (his half-brother's only child) and instead become his clan's Mog-ur (shaman), while his younger sister's son, Toross. Although Joisan has been in an ArrangedMarriage since early childhood, Toross's mother keeps trying to throw her together with Toross in the hopes of securing the succession for him. And Toross goes along with it because [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend he's genuinely in love with Joisan]].
** In ''Literature/IceCrown'', downplayed; Princess Ludorica says her grandfather would have preferred a prince, but has used her.
** Downplayed still more in ''Literature/TheZeroStone'', where the only effect
brother, Brun, is that Jern's father tried to teach him and his brother but not their sister.
* In Creator/PiersAnthony's ''Literature/ASpellForChameleon'', the Magician Trent must marry the Sorceress Iris in order to remain in Literature/{{Xanth}}; this condition is set because only Magicians can rule in Xanth, and in hopes that their powers will ensure that they have a Magician son. In ''The Source of Magic'', the widowed Trent has difficulty ensuring an heir because he's still in love with his first wife; they do succeed, in time, in having a child, but a daughter. Finally, in ''Night Mare'', when Magicians are being removed as soon as they are King, during an invasion, LoopholeAbuse is invoked: the laws of Literature/{{Xanth}} forbid a ruling queen, but [[SheIsTheKing do not explicitly require that kings be male]]. Sorceresses, both Iris and her daughter, ascend the throne as Kings.
* The entire plot
leader of the ''Literature/MerryGentry'' series is TheFairFolk being mostly infertile, and whether Prince Cel or Merry can deliver clan.
** On the other hand, Clan men lack the racial memories of healing plants which medicine women possess, resulting in
an heir first.
* The ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series:
** The House of Rahl takes it a step further: Not
[[GenderInvertedTrope Heir Club for Women]], in which each medicine woman passes on her knowledge only must they have a male heir, but the heir must have the magical gift. More recent generations (particularly Darken Rahl) took to killing any female and/or non-gifted children.
** Inverted in the case of the Confessors. Any ''male'' child of a Confessor had to be killed because they invariably ended up abusing their power.
her daughters.



* In ''Literature/TheForgottenBeastsOfEld'', the baby Tamlorn's mother is Sybel's aunt, who married King Drede. His father is either the king, in which case he's the heir, or another man, who the king killed in a fit of jealousy, which is why Tam's life is in danger, especially since in the latter case, he could be a pretender for the king's rivals to gather around.
* In ''Literature/TheGoblinEmperor'', this drives most of the plot. The elven emperor was very dutiful in begetting sons; he not only divorced one wife for barrenness, he also produced a total of four sons with different wives. Only because those three sons and he himself die in an airship accident does his half-goblin son Maia inherit the throne. And is then promptly told by his advisors that he has to produce a male heir. Maia agrees that arranging a marriage for him is the wisest course of action, but does not manage to get really enthusiastic about it, and at one point invalidates his own claim to the throne by calling the barren ex-wife of his father "zhasanai", a title reserved for the emperor's ''widow''. As he already has an underage nephew who could inherit the throne after him, producing a male heir is less about securing that there is a heir, and more about making sure that those who would like to see his nephew on the throne don't just have to murder ''him'' to get there.



* The ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'' has Emperor Gregor, last of a RoyallyScrewedUp line of emperors, who seemed quite averse to marriage and heir-production. Which caused no end of trouble for his Prime Minister, [[{{Cincinnatus}} Aral Vorkosigan]], who was arguably the most legitimate claimant to the throne but adamantly did not want the job, as well as his son, Miles.



* ''Literature/{{Darkover}}'' is obsessed with this trope and wanting sons, though with several exceptions. The Aillard line is matriarchal and matrilineal, and Renunciates are forbidden from playing the game; they must vow to never make a traditional royal marriage or become a concubine, and "to bear children only in [their] own time and season," not for their family's ambitions. This is justified because [[PsychicPowers laran]] is determined [[SuperpowerfulGenetics genetically]].
* This trope is played with by Creator/SheriSTepper in three novels. In ''Six Moon Dance'' the founding mothers of the planet Newholme create an artificial scarcity of female babies, and a dominant ideology that females are the stronger sex and males are the weaker, leading to the population desiring female heirs. In ''Raising the Stones'' the power derived by males from their heirs is eradicated by legally denying the father-child relationship. Heirs are are only accepted through the maternal line, and any male claiming fathership is frowned upon. And in ''Literature/TheGateToWomensCountry'' the women and men of the story live in different quarters, and when a male comes of age they must choose which quarter they permanently wish to live in. If they, for example, choose the men?s quarter, then their mother can no longer claim them as an heir; if they choose the women?s quarter, then the father no longer has fathership.
* A particularly ironic {{lampshade|Hanging}} is placed on Rhys in Katharine Kerr's {{Literature/Deverry}} Cycle, when he puts aside his wife for being infertile...and she remarries and is immediately knocked up by her new husband, much to the amusement of everyone involved, except Rhys. A much less amusing example in one of the flashback story arcs involved a king who had three daughters and no sons. When he died the fathers of his grandsons each declared that their firstborn son was the rightful king (And that the father of the 'rightful' king was naturally his regent until the king became of age). This kicked off a century long SuccessionCrisis known as the Time of Troubles.
* In ''Literature/TheCastleOfOtranto'', a nobleman's sole male heir is mysteriously killed, and he immediately begins making plans to marry his late son's fiancee, annulling his current marriage and consigning his wife and daughter to ruin. Played with, in that he acts this way because he fears that failure to produce another son will bring an ancestral curse down on him, not because he actually cares about his bloodline's future.
* In ''[[Literature/AssassinFantastic Coin of the Realm]]'', Princess Rosalind's father had six daughters before finally getting the son he wanted to succeed him. He regards his daughters as nothing more than "coin to be traded", with no more value than whatever he can get for marrying them off. This, naturally, doesn't sit well with Rosalind at all.
* In Lynda Robinson's Lord Meren mysteries, in which Meren is perfectly happy having his ''adopted'' son Kysen as his legal heir. His relatives, on the other hand, loathe the idea of a common-born adoptee carrying on the family name, and keep badgering the widowed Meren to remarry and produce a "proper" son.

to:

* ''Literature/{{Darkover}}'' In Cornelia Funke's ''Literature/{{Inkheart}}'' series, the Adderhead is obsessed with terrified of death; and somehow this trope and wanting sons, though with several exceptions. makes him think he needs a male heir.
* In ''Literature/{{Ladylord}}'', trouble regarding a lack of male heirs makes an appearance twice in the story.
The Aillard line is matriarchal and matrilineal, and Renunciates are forbidden from playing the game; they must vow to never make a traditional royal marriage or become a concubine, and "to bear children only in [their] own time and season," not for their family's ambitions. This is justified because [[PsychicPowers laran]] is determined [[SuperpowerfulGenetics genetically]].
* This trope is played with by Creator/SheriSTepper in three novels. In ''Six Moon Dance'' the founding mothers
whole premise of the planet Newholme create an artificial scarcity of female babies, and a dominant ideology that females are the stronger sex and males are the weaker, leading to the population desiring female heirs. In ''Raising the Stones'' the power derived by males from their heirs book is eradicated by legally denying the father-child relationship. Heirs are are only accepted through the maternal line, and any male claiming fathership is frowned upon. And in ''Literature/TheGateToWomensCountry'' the women and men of the story live in different quarters, and kicked off when a male comes of age they must choose which quarter they permanently wish lord doesn't have any sons, but declares his daughter to live in. If they, for example, choose be [[SheIsTheKing his "son" and heir]] anyway. In the men?s quarter, then their mother can no longer claim them as other case, a lord has trouble acquiring an heir; if they choose heir due to impotence, making the women?s quarter, then the father no longer has fathership.
* A
pregnancy of one particular concubine particularly ironic {{lampshade|Hanging}} is placed on Rhys in Katharine Kerr's {{Literature/Deverry}} Cycle, when he puts aside his wife for being infertile...and she remarries and is immediately knocked up by her new husband, much valuable to the amusement of everyone involved, except Rhys. A much less amusing example in one of the flashback story arcs involved a king who had three daughters and no sons. When he died the fathers of his grandsons each declared that their firstborn son was the rightful king (And that the father of the 'rightful' king was naturally his regent until the king became of age). him. This kicked off a century long SuccessionCrisis known as grants said concubine more leeway in court than she would otherwise have. After the Time child is born, she is part of Troubles.
* In ''Literature/TheCastleOfOtranto'',
a nobleman's sole male heir is mysteriously killed, and he immediately begins making plans plot to marry his late son's fiancee, annulling his current marriage and consigning his wife and daughter to ruin. Played with, have him kidnapped by the lord's enemies, in that he acts this way part because this preserves her necessity - she's the only woman ever to bear the lord a son, and he fears that failure can't kill her if he thinks he needs to produce make another son will bring an ancestral curse down on him, not because he actually cares about his bloodline's future.
* In ''[[Literature/AssassinFantastic Coin of
one. (In fact, the Realm]]'', Princess Rosalind's father had six daughters before finally getting the son he wanted to succeed him. He regards his daughters as nothing more than "coin to be traded", with no more value than whatever he can get for marrying them off. This, naturally, doesn't sit well with Rosalind at all.
first child [[MamasBabyPapasMaybe isn't even his]].)
* In Lynda Robinson's Lord Meren ''Lord Meren'' mysteries, in which Meren is perfectly happy having his ''adopted'' son Kysen as his legal heir. His relatives, on the other hand, loathe the idea of a common-born adoptee carrying on the family name, and keep badgering the widowed Meren to remarry and produce a "proper" son.
* The entire plot of the ''Literature/MerryGentry'' series is TheFairFolk being mostly infertile, and whether Prince Cel or Merry can deliver an heir first.
* Creator/AndreNorton examples:
** ''[[Literature/WitchWorld The Jargoon Pard]]'': Lady Heroise is determined to bear a son she can mold into her puppet and so rule Car do Prawn. Unfortunately her child is a daughter. Luckily the expectant couple in the next room has [[SwitchedAtBirth just delivered a son]]. But unbeknownst to Heroise the father just happens to be her own long lost half-brother....!
** ''The Crystal Gryphon'' and the prequel short story "Of the Shaping of Ulm's Heir" are begun by this trope. Lord Ulric of Ulmsdale had been unable to father any living children, so he divorced his second wife and married the widowed Lady Tephana because she was of proven fertility, having a son from a previous marriage. This led to a great deal of trouble starting at the end of the short story and picking up at the beginning of the novel, when Lady Tephana utterly rejected her son by Ulric - Kerovan - and settled down to scheming on behalf of her first-marriage son and later her daughter by Ulric. (The latter could inherit if Kerovan died or was publicly rejected as being unqualified to rule, e.g. because of mental or physical infirmity).
** Joisan, the female lead of ''The Crystal Gryphon'' is involved in another potential SuccessionCrisis. Her paternal uncle, the lord of Ithdale, has no children but two potential heirs: Joisan (his half-brother's only child) and his younger sister's son, Toross. Although Joisan has been in an ArrangedMarriage since early childhood, Toross's mother keeps trying to throw her together with Toross in the hopes of securing the succession for him. And Toross goes along with it because [[UnluckyChildhoodFriend he's genuinely in love with Joisan]].
** In ''Literature/IceCrown'', downplayed; Princess Ludorica says her grandfather would have preferred a prince, but has used her.
** Downplayed still more in ''Literature/TheZeroStone'', where the only effect is that Jern's father tried to teach him and his brother but not their sister.
* The background of the ''One Dozen Daughters'' series by Creator/MercedesLackey is a tiny kingdom where the royal couple of a nation that practices strict primogeniture ends up producing thirteen children before they finally get an heir. Then they realize that such a small kingdom can't afford a dozen royal dowries, so it is decided that as each daughter comes of age, she has to leave the kingdom and seek her fortune somewhere else (The books themselves follow the adventures of said daughters).
* ''Literature/TheOrdinaryPrincess'': All children born to a King of Phantasmarania are girls. Each King's next in line for the throne is his eldest daughter's youngest
son.



* In Creator/RobertEHoward's stories of Franchise/ConanTheBarbarian after he became king, several times it is a plot point that Conan's death creates a problem, as he has no son. Oddly enough, we never see any pressure on him to marry and have one, though in other stories he does eventually get married and have a son.
* In Cornelia Funke's {{Inkheart}} series, the Adderhead is terrified of death; and somehow this makes him think he needs a male heir.
* The Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse gives us the misandrist Hapans. But Ta'a Chume never had a daughter, so her daughter-in-law, from the primitive and even ''more'' misandrist Dathomiri, becomes the new queen. But mostly she doesn't want Jedi to rule her kingdom. Three guesses what religion her granddaughter joins.
* Male heirs are the norm in ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'', with the Princedom of Corisande being of particular note, as Prince Hektor regards his heir as an InadequateInheritor, and would gladly make his daughter Irys the heir of Corisandian law allowed it. There are exceptions though, primarily with Sharleyan of Chisholm, who inherited, and kept, the Crown despite the shadow of a less competent queen hanging over her. She later became the co-ruler and TheLancer to Cayleb of Charis, and nobody has any doubt that Cayelb and Sharleyan's daughter Alahnah will be their heir in the fullness of time.
* ''Literature/SeptimusHeap'' has only female Queens. Men can't become rulers, and there never were any Kings; even the idea is deemed ludicrous.



* Used in the ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' series.

to:

* Used Male heirs are the norm in ''Literature/{{Safehold}}'', with the Princedom of Corisande being of particular note, as Prince Hektor regards his heir as an InadequateInheritor, and would gladly make his daughter Irys the heir of Corisandian law allowed it. There are exceptions though, primarily with Sharleyan of Chisholm, who inherited, and kept, the Crown despite the shadow of a less competent queen hanging over her. She later became the co-ruler and TheLancer to Cayleb of Charis, and nobody has any doubt that Cayleb and Sharleyan's daughter Alahnah will be their heir in the ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' series.fullness of time.
* ''Literature/SeptimusHeap'' has only female Queens. Men can't become rulers, and there never were any Kings; even the idea is deemed ludicrous.
* ''Literature/TheSilmarillion'': The kingdom of Númenor had a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primogeniture#Agnatic_primogeniture Agnatic Primogeniture]] law applied to its line of Kings. Tar-Aldarion, having no male heirs and having only a daughter, changed the Law of Succession, replacing the principle of agnatic primogeniture with that of fully equal primogeniture and she (as Tar-Ancalimë) became the first Ruling Queen of Númenor. Afterwards, the oldest child inherited the throne whether they were male or female.\\
\\
His legal changes were largely undone in practice, however, as only two other queens claimed the throne in the next 16 generations. The odds of this happening by pure chance are ''extremely'' low, assuming male and female royal offspring were equally likely to be born and survive to inherit.
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'':



* In ''Literature/TheForgottenBeastsOfEld'', the baby Tamlorn's mother is Sybel's aunt, who married King Drede. His father is either the king, in which case he's the heir, or another man, who the king killed in a fit of jealousy, which is why Tam's life is in danger, especially since in the latter case, he could be a pretender for the king's rivals to gather around.
* In the Literature/TalesOfTheBranionRealm, equal primogeniture is used, possibly because the sovereign doubles as a [[GodInHumanForm religious avatar]] and the God in question neither recognizes nor cares about gender. It doesn't care about bastardy either, which drives the plot of the third book when the royal family has converted to a different faith and a woman [[StalkerWithATestTube seduces]] the monarch to bear his firstborn. A civil war ensues.
* In ''[[Literature/AuntDimity Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince]]'', Tappan Hall actually belongs to Lady Barbara Booker's great-nephew due to an entail. Even so, he declines to be addressed by the title "Lord" while she's still alive, insisting that she should rightfully have it.
* In ''Literature/{{Ladylord}}'', trouble regarding a lack of male heirs makes an appearance twice in the story. The whole premise of the book is kicked off when a lord doesn't have any sons, but declares his daughter to be [[SheIsTheKing his "son" and heir]] anyway. In the other case, a lord has trouble acquiring an heir due to impotence, making the pregnancy of one particular concubine particularly valuable to him. This grants said concubine more leeway in court than she would otherwise have. After the child is born, she is part of a plot to have him kidnapped by the lord's enemies, in part because this preserves her necessity - she's the only woman ever to bear the lord a son, and he can't kill her if he thinks he needs to make another one. (In fact, the first child [[MamasBabyPapasMaybe isn't even his]].)
* In ''Literature/DarkOnesMistress'', this is the main reason Clara, along with four other women, was kidnapped in the first place.
* ''Literature/TheOrdinaryPrincess'': All children born to a King of Phantasmarania are girls. Each King's next in line for the throne is his eldest daughter's youngest son.
* The background of the ''One Dozen Daughters'' series by Creator/MercedesLackey is a tiny kingdom where the royal couple of a nation that practices strict primogeniture ends up producing thirteen children before they finally get an heir. Then they realize that such a small kingdom can't afford a dozen royal dowries, so it is decided that as each daughter comes of age, she has to leave the kingdom and seek her fortune somewhere else (The books themselves follow the adventures of said daughters).

to:

* In ''Literature/TheForgottenBeastsOfEld'', ''Franchise/StarWarsLegends'' gives us the baby Tamlorn's mother is Sybel's aunt, who married King Drede. His father is either misandrist Hapans. But Ta'a Chume never had a daughter, so her daughter-in-law, from the king, in which case he's primitive and even ''more'' misandrist Dathomiri, becomes the heir, or another man, who the king killed in a fit of jealousy, which is why Tam's life is in danger, especially since in the latter case, he could be a pretender for the king's rivals new queen. But mostly she doesn't want Jedi to gather around.
rule her kingdom. Three guesses what religion her granddaughter joins.
* In the Literature/TalesOfTheBranionRealm, first book of Melanie Rawn's ''Sunrunner'' series, ''Literature/DragonPrince'', the realm is in an incredibly fragile political situation due solely to the fact High Prince Roelstra has ''seventeen'' daughters, yet no male heir; like Henry VIII in real life, Roelstra has put aside wife after wife, and his daughters (legitimate and illegitimate) are both opportun''ists'' and opportun''ities'', politically. One of the book's key intrigues rests on ensuring (via an elaborate deception) that Roelstra's fourth and current wife bears -- or ''appears'' to bear -- a son.
* The ''Literature/SwordOfTruth'' series:
** The House of Rahl takes it a step further: Not only must they have a male heir, but the heir must have the magical gift. More recent generations (particularly Darken Rahl) took to killing any female and/or non-gifted children.
** Inverted in the case of the Confessors. Any ''male'' child of a Confessor had to be killed because they invariably ended up abusing their power.
* In the ''Literature/TalesOfTheBranionRealm'',
equal primogeniture is used, possibly because the sovereign doubles as a [[GodInHumanForm religious avatar]] and the God in question neither recognizes nor cares about gender. It doesn't care about bastardy either, which drives the plot of the third book when the royal family has converted to a different faith and a woman [[StalkerWithATestTube seduces]] the monarch to bear his firstborn. A civil war ensues.
* This trope is played with by Creator/SheriSTepper in three novels. In ''[[Literature/AuntDimity Aunt Dimity and ''Six Moon Dance'' the Lost Prince]]'', Tappan Hall actually belongs to Lady Barbara Booker's great-nephew due to an entail. Even so, he declines to be addressed by the title "Lord" while she's still alive, insisting that she should rightfully have it.
* In ''Literature/{{Ladylord}}'', trouble regarding a lack of male heirs makes an appearance twice in the story. The whole premise
founding mothers of the book planet Newholme create an artificial scarcity of female babies, and a dominant ideology that females are the stronger sex and males are the weaker, leading to the population desiring female heirs. In ''Raising the Stones'' the power derived by males from their heirs is kicked off eradicated by legally denying the father-child relationship. Heirs are are only accepted through the maternal line, and any male claiming fathership is frowned upon. And in ''Literature/TheGateToWomensCountry'' the women and men of the story live in different quarters, and when a lord doesn't have any sons, but declares his daughter male comes of age they must choose which quarter they permanently wish to be [[SheIsTheKing his "son" and heir]] anyway. In live in. If they, for example, choose the other case, a lord men?s quarter, then their mother can no longer claim them as an heir; if they choose the women?s quarter, then the father no longer has trouble acquiring an fathership.
* In Creator/CSLewis' ''Literature/TillWeHaveFaces'', the king of Glome wants a male
heir due to impotence, making the pregnancy of one particular concubine particularly valuable to him. This grants said concubine more leeway in court than she would otherwise have. After the child is born, she is part of a plot to have him kidnapped by the lord's enemies, in part because this preserves her necessity - she's the only woman ever to bear the lord a son, and he can't kill her if he thinks he needs to make another one. (In fact, the first child [[MamasBabyPapasMaybe isn't even his]].)
* In ''Literature/DarkOnesMistress'',
gets three daughters. His anger about this is the main reason Clara, along with four other women, was kidnapped source of much tension in his family and the first place.
* ''Literature/TheOrdinaryPrincess'': All children born to a King of Phantasmarania are girls. Each King's next in line for
court. In the end, his oldest daughter seizes, and holds, the throne is after his eldest daughter's youngest son.
death.
* The background of ''Literature/TortallUniverse'': According to Thayet ''jian'' Wilima, a document called the ''One Dozen Daughters'' series by Creator/MercedesLackey is a tiny kingdom where the royal couple ''Book of a nation Glass'' states that practices strict primogeniture ends up producing thirteen children before they finally get an heir. Then they realize that such a small kingdom this is the case for her home country of Sarain, and apparently it's magically or divinely enforced, which is why she can't afford taken the throne despite being the only child of the late Warlord.
* The ''Literature/VorkosiganSaga'' has Emperor Gregor, last of
a dozen royal dowries, so it RoyallyScrewedUp line of emperors, who seemed quite averse to marriage and heir-production. Which caused no end of trouble for his Prime Minister, [[{{Cincinnatus}} Aral Vorkosigan]], who was arguably the most legitimate claimant to the throne but adamantly did not want the job, as well as his son, Miles.
* Inverted in Robert Jordan's ''Literature/TheWheelOfTime''. Andor
is decided always ruled by a queen, and it's said that as each daughter comes of age, she no man has to leave ever survived sitting on the kingdom Lion Throne. Every so often there are minor "[[SuccessionCrisis wars of succession]]" because it's unclear which woman is next in line.
* Downplayed in ''Literature/TheWitchlands'' -- Vivia is the heir to the Nubrevnan throne despite having a younger brother, but the Council gives her a lot of grief for being a woman
and seek it's quite obvious that they'd rather marry her fortune somewhere else (The books themselves follow off to have a man on the adventures throne or somehow get Merik to be the king. Vivia also notes that while there's no formal rule about the gender of said daughters).the Council memebers, all women eligible for a seat end up sending a male relative in their stead. [[spoiler:At least until the end of the second book.]]



* ''Literature/TheAscendantKingdomsSaga'': It's discovered in the first book, ''Ice Forged'', that a long-ago ruler, King Hougen, anchored humanity's control of magic to the bloodlines of himself and twelve of his followers, anchors that are ''only'' passed along the lines of firstborn sons. [[DeconstructedTrope Because of this]], over half the anchoring bloodlines, including that of Hougen himself, ended even ''before'' a FantasticNuke attack kills off almost all of Donderath's noble houses and brings on [[ApocalypseHow the collapse of human civilization across the Continent]]. This leaves protagonist Blaine [=McFadden=], who was exiled for murder at the start of the series, as the last surviving Lord of the Blood and therefore the only one able to re-anchor magic.[[note]]Technically one of the others survives, but he's a wraith so he doesn't count as far as the magic is concerned.[[/note]]
* In ''Literature/TheGoblinEmperor'', this drives most of the plot. The elven emperor was very dutiful in begetting sons; he not only divorced one wife for barrenness, he also produced a total of four sons with different wives. Only because those three sons and he himself die in an airship accident does his half-goblin son Maia inherit the throne. And is then promptly told by his advisors that he has to produce a male heir. Maia agrees that arranging a marriage for him is the wisest course of action, but does not manage to get really enthusiastic about it, and at one point invalidates his own claim to the throne by calling the barren ex-wife of his father "zhasanai", a title reserved for the emperor's ''widow''. As he already has an underage nephew who could inherit the throne after him, producing a male heir is less about securing that there is a heir, and more about making sure that those who would like to see his nephew on the throne don't just have to murder ''him'' to get there.
* Justified in-universe in ''[[Literature/EarthsChildren The Clan of the Cave Bear]]''. Since Clan women are inherently incapable of leadership, each clan is led by a man who invariably passes the leadership on to another male. The new leader is traditionally the oldest son of the previous leader, though there are exceptions. For example, Creb is the oldest son of a leader, but, because he is crippled and therefore unable to truly become a man in the eyes of the Clan, he has instead become his clan's Mog-ur (shaman), while his younger brother, Brun, is leader of the clan.
** On the other hand, Clan men lack the racial memories of healing plants which medicine women possess, resulting in an [[GenderInvertedTrope Heir Club for Women]], in which each medicine woman passes on her knowledge only to her daughters.
* Underplayed in ''Literature/TheWitchlands'' - Vivia is the heir to the Nubrvenan throne despite having a younger brother, but the Council gives her a lot of grief for being a woman and it's quite obvious that they'd rather marry her off to have a man on the throne or somehow get Merik to be the king. Vivia also notes that while there's no formal rule about the gender of the Council memebers, all women eligible for a seat end up sending a male relative in their stead. [[spoiler:At least until the end of the second book.]]

to:

* ''Literature/TheAscendantKingdomsSaga'': It's discovered in In Creator/PiersAnthony's ''Literature/ASpellForChameleon'', the first book, ''Ice Forged'', Magician Trent must marry the Sorceress Iris in order to remain in Literature/{{Xanth}}; this condition is set because only Magicians can rule in Xanth, and in hopes that a long-ago ruler, King Hougen, anchored humanity's control of magic to the bloodlines of himself and twelve of his followers, anchors their powers will ensure that are ''only'' passed along they have a Magician son. In ''The Source of Magic'', the lines of firstborn sons. [[DeconstructedTrope Because of this]], over half the anchoring bloodlines, including that of Hougen himself, ended even ''before'' a FantasticNuke attack kills off almost all of Donderath's noble houses and brings on [[ApocalypseHow the collapse of human civilization across the Continent]]. This leaves protagonist Blaine [=McFadden=], who was exiled for murder at the start of the series, as the last surviving Lord of the Blood and therefore the only one able to re-anchor magic.[[note]]Technically one of the others survives, but widowed Trent has difficulty ensuring an heir because he's a wraith so he doesn't count as far as the magic is concerned.[[/note]]
* In ''Literature/TheGoblinEmperor'', this drives most of the plot. The elven emperor was very dutiful
still in begetting sons; he not only divorced one wife for barrenness, he also produced a total of four sons love with different wives. Only because those three sons and he himself die in an airship accident does his half-goblin son Maia inherit first wife; they do succeed, in time, in having a child, but a daughter. Finally, in ''Night Mare'', when Magicians are being removed as soon as they are King, during an invasion, LoopholeAbuse is invoked: the throne. And is then promptly told by his advisors laws of Literature/{{Xanth}} forbid a ruling queen, but [[SheIsTheKing do not explicitly require that he has to produce a male heir. Maia agrees that arranging a marriage for him is the wisest course of action, but does not manage to get really enthusiastic about it, kings be male]]. Sorceresses, both Iris and at one point invalidates his own claim to her daughter, ascend the throne by calling the barren ex-wife of his father "zhasanai", a title reserved for the emperor's ''widow''. As he already has an underage nephew who could inherit the throne after him, producing a male heir is less about securing that there is a heir, and more about making sure that those who would like to see his nephew on the throne don't just have to murder ''him'' to get there.
* Justified in-universe in ''[[Literature/EarthsChildren The Clan of the Cave Bear]]''. Since Clan women are inherently incapable of leadership, each clan is led by a man who invariably passes the leadership on to another male. The new leader is traditionally the oldest son of the previous leader, though there are exceptions. For example, Creb is the oldest son of a leader, but, because he is crippled and therefore unable to truly become a man in the eyes of the Clan, he has instead become his clan's Mog-ur (shaman), while his younger brother, Brun, is leader of the clan.
** On the other hand, Clan men lack the racial memories of healing plants which medicine women possess, resulting in an [[GenderInvertedTrope Heir Club for Women]], in which each medicine woman passes on her knowledge only to her daughters.
* Underplayed in ''Literature/TheWitchlands'' - Vivia is the heir to the Nubrvenan throne despite having a younger brother, but the Council gives her a lot of grief for being a woman and it's quite obvious that they'd rather marry her off to have a man on the throne or somehow get Merik to be the king. Vivia also notes that while there's no formal rule about the gender of the Council memebers, all women eligible for a seat end up sending a male relative in their stead. [[spoiler:At least until the end of the second book.]]
as Kings.
13th Mar '17 9:38:11 AM ScottMarshall
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*** Matilda's son Henry II profited from this when French king Louis VII grew so worried over his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine so far only bearing daughters that he had his marriage annulled (officially on grounds of consanguinity) even though that meant losing control over Aquitaine. To make matters worse from Louis' point of view, Eleanor then married Henry II (handing over Aquitaine to England) and bore him four sons, including Richard the Lionheart and John. Of course from Henry Plantagenet's point of view that may have been too much of a good thing because his sons kept conspiring and fighting against each other as well as against their father.

to:

*** Matilda's son Henry II profited from this when French king Louis VII grew so worried over his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine so far only bearing daughters that he had his marriage annulled (officially on grounds of consanguinity) even though that meant losing control over Aquitaine. To make matters worse from Louis' point of view, Eleanor then married Henry II (handing over Aquitaine to England) and bore him four sons, including Richard the Lionheart and John.John Lackland. Of course from Henry Plantagenet's point of view that may have been too much of a good thing because his sons kept conspiring and fighting against each other as well as against their father.
12th Mar '17 4:21:21 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Most noble families seen thus far practice male-preferential primogeniture: the eldest living son inherits, but a daughter can make do if there are no sons. However, according to Septa Mordane, the Iron Throne can only go to the closest male relative. In spite of this, Stannis names his daughter Shireen (his only child) as his heir. The one kingdom in Westeros which consistently averts this is Dorne; Dornish law provides for absolute primogeniture, meaning that the oldest child inherits, regardless of gender.

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': Most noble families seen thus far practice male-preferential primogeniture: the eldest living son inherits, but a daughter can make do if there are no sons. However, according to Septa Mordane, the Iron Throne can only go to the closest male relative. In spite of this, Stannis names his daughter Shireen (his only child) as his heir. The one kingdom in Westeros which consistently averts this is Dorne; Dornish law provides for absolute primogeniture, meaning that the oldest child inherits, regardless of gender.
12th Mar '17 4:20:39 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': All the noble families seen thus far practice male-preferential primogeniture: the eldest living son inherits, but a daughter can make do if there are no sons. However, according to Septa Mordane, the Iron Throne can only go to the closest male relative. In spite of this, Stannis names his daughter Shireen (his only child) as his heir.

to:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': All the Most noble families seen thus far practice male-preferential primogeniture: the eldest living son inherits, but a daughter can make do if there are no sons. However, according to Septa Mordane, the Iron Throne can only go to the closest male relative. In spite of this, Stannis names his daughter Shireen (his only child) as his heir. The one kingdom in Westeros which consistently averts this is Dorne; Dornish law provides for absolute primogeniture, meaning that the oldest child inherits, regardless of gender.
23rd Feb '17 7:11:04 AM lavendermintrose
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Acca: 13 District Inspection Department'', Prince Schwan is regarded as the heir because he is the only (known) son of the king's daughters. [[spoiler: When he realizes Lotta is his cousin, he doesn't care, because she is a girl... until Magie tells him Lotta has a brother.]]
17th Feb '17 2:37:13 PM TechPriest90
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** To say that this "law" was deeply unpopular is putting it mildly. 1857 showed just how much it was hated - while the Indian Government today likes to style the uprising of 1857 as the [[InsistentTerminology First War of Indian Independence]], a more pragmatic observation is that it was largely the local nobles (and their armies, of course) doing most of the killing and maiming - [[ValuesDissonance roughly 100,000 Britishers, almost all of them being Company officials or their mercenaries]] - in retaliation for them trying to snatch their lands away. Good luck trying to find anyone who sympathises with [[AssholeVictim the Company]] in India today though - [[FlameBait it's a touchy subject.]] TheRaj that came afterwards, [[KnowWhenToFoldEm understandably enough]], withdrew the law - AndThereWasMuchRejoicing. For the nobles anyway.

to:

** To say that this "law" was deeply unpopular is putting it mildly. 1857 showed just how much it was hated - while the Indian Government today likes to style the uprising of 1857 as the [[InsistentTerminology First War of Indian Independence]], a more pragmatic observation is that it was largely the local nobles (and their armies, of course) doing most of the killing and maiming - [[ValuesDissonance roughly 100,000 Britishers, all Britishers they could get their hands on, almost all of them being Company officials or their mercenaries]] - in retaliation for them trying to snatch their lands away. Good luck trying to find anyone who sympathises with [[AssholeVictim the Company]] in India today though - [[FlameBait it's a touchy subject.]] TheRaj that came afterwards, [[KnowWhenToFoldEm understandably enough]], withdrew the law - AndThereWasMuchRejoicing. For the nobles anyway.
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