History Main / HealthCareMotivation

25th Mar '18 9:24:45 PM Mdumas43073
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[[quoteright:349:[[WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Scott_Lang_Criminal_9024.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:349:[[Music/TupacShakur "Thug life, thug life, I gotta do what I gotta do!"]]]]

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[[quoteright:349:[[WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes [[quoteright:320:[[WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Scott_Lang_Criminal_9024.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:349:[[Music/TupacShakur [[caption-width-right:320:[[Music/TupacShakur "Thug life, thug life, I gotta do what I gotta do!"]]]]
31st Dec '17 6:51:21 PM wingedcatgirl
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Fan Works]]
* In ''Fanfic/HarryPotterAndTheMethodsOfRationality'', the Aurors guarding Azkaban are known to [[IllPretendIDidntHearThat look the other way]] when people sneak in to give prisoners illegal chocolate and Patronus time, for the right price. What the right price is depends on which Auror catches you -- Bahry, whose wife is ill and needs expensive treatments, demands the highest price by far.
[[/folder]]
12th Nov '17 7:57:27 PM harostar
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* In ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'', it's eventually revealed to be what motivated [[spoiler: Bertolt Hoover]]. The military was providing medical care for their ailing father, who was able to "die in comfort" thanks to their child's service.
1st Nov '17 8:47:42 PM Berrenta
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''VideoGame/TheJackboxPartyPack 3'''s "Tee K.O.", a nekomata, one of the characters that can be chosen, enters the T-shirt competition so they can get treatment for their ailing mother. If they win, [[spoiler: the Mayo Clinic gets moved by the victory and heal the mother free of charge, while also giving her cybernetic thumbs and a bluetooth spleen.]]
4th Aug '17 1:16:28 PM ironballs16
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''[Closing Credits]''

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''[Closing Credits]''''[[[CouldHaveAvoidedThisPlot Closing Credits]]]''
4th Aug '17 1:16:03 PM ironballs16
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-->''Opening Scene:''' Walter White sits in his doctor's office. The Doctor looks at him seriously.\\

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-->''Opening -->'''Opening Scene:''' Walter ''Walter White sits in his doctor's office. The Doctor looks at him seriously.seriously''.\\
26th Jun '17 3:05:51 AM MAI742
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One way of getting around the USA's public health system's criteria is to make the curation of the patient's affliction an 'optional' treatment or a procedure that requires a specialized doctor to be brought in for any chance of success, skirting the federal law in that they're not ''refusing'' to give care because the patient is indigent, but not providing a specific ''kind'' of care. Even outside the USA, experimental treatment that's only available in one country is a way to make the HealthcareMotivation trope universal: state or private insurance might cover the treatment itself, but probably not the plane tickets and other expenses. One also has to look at the time period involved -- some of those "duty to care" laws are relatively recent, or have had poor enforcement in the past. And in some cases, hospital administrators might believe it's cheaper to pay fines than bankrupt themselves over a particularly expensive patient.

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One way of getting around the USA's public health system's criteria is to make the curation of classify curing the patient's affliction as an 'optional' treatment or a procedure that requires a specialized doctor to be brought in for any chance of success, skirting the federal law in that they're not ''refusing'' to give care because the patient is indigent, but not providing a specific ''kind'' of care. Even outside the USA, experimental treatment that's only available in one country is a way to make the HealthcareMotivation trope universal: state or private insurance might cover the treatment itself, but probably not the plane tickets and other expenses. One also has to look at the time period involved -- some of those "duty to care" laws are relatively recent, or have had poor enforcement in the past. And in some cases, hospital administrators might believe it's cheaper to pay fines than bankrupt themselves over a particularly expensive patient.
26th Jun '17 3:04:11 AM MAI742
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Saving themselves or a dying family member/lover/friend is a great motivation for a character to do (morally questionable) things that they otherwise might not, especially if money-grubbing private hospitals refuse to treat people without insurance unless they're paid cash upfront (this does actually happen, sadly). Whether it's [[Workaholic working themselves to the bone]], getting indebted [[LoanShark to shady characters]], participating in [[TheMostDangerousGame gladiatorial blood-sports]], being a mercenary/hitman, or [[SingleMomStripper selling their body]] - [[HealthcareMotivation love can inspire them to do all sorts of unusual things]].

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Saving themselves or a dying family member/lover/friend is a great motivation for a character to do (morally questionable) things that they otherwise might not, especially if money-grubbing private hospitals refuse to treat people without insurance unless they're paid cash upfront (this does actually happen, sadly). Whether it's [[Workaholic [[{{Workaholic}} working themselves to the bone]], getting indebted [[LoanShark to shady characters]], participating in [[TheMostDangerousGame gladiatorial blood-sports]], being a mercenary/hitman, or [[SingleMomStripper selling their body]] - [[HealthcareMotivation love can inspire them to do all sorts of unusual things]].
26th Jun '17 3:03:22 AM MAI742
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In countries where the healthcare sector is [[UsefulNotes/Capitalism mostly or entirely run for profit]], as a result of very poor or non-existent [[UsefulNotes/Socialism universal (publicly-provided or state-monitored) healthcare]], healthcare providers and insurers prioritise profit generation over the survival and wellbeing of the population.

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In countries where the healthcare sector is [[UsefulNotes/Capitalism [[UsefulNotes/{{Capitalism}} mostly or entirely run for profit]], as a result of very poor or non-existent [[UsefulNotes/Socialism [[UsefulNotes/{{Socialism}} universal (publicly-provided or state-monitored) healthcare]], healthcare providers and insurers prioritise profit generation over the survival and wellbeing of the population.
26th Jun '17 3:03:02 AM MAI742
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In countries that have little or no public health-care system, the financial cost of medical intervention or treatment can increase very rapidly. And a situation where a vital operation can't be performed because of a lack of money is just what the RuleOfDrama ordered. Thus, if a story takes place in such a country (or even in countries with social security) it is not unusual for one of the characters to be motivated by a family member or friend afflicted by [[SoapOperaDisease some rare degenerative disease]]. Since the doctors won't give any treatment if they are not paid cash upfront (the rarer the disease, the more expensive the treatment), this character will have no choice but to participate in some game, tournament, borrow money or simply work night and day (not ruling out [[SingleMomStripper sex work]] even for a character who otherwise wouldn't consider such a thing), anything that will earn him enough money for the treatment. Failure may result in a MissingMom, DisappearedDad, and the likes.

Much as this trope is often a case of poor research, it can very well be TruthInTelevision, depending on the case.

In the US at least it is illegal to deny care, even if the patient can't pay, but these laws often only apply to stabilizing a patient who needs emergency care. Some things are classed as aesthetic (fixing a cleft palate) and therefore optional, and some problems come up with organ transplants and certain pricey cancer treatments (which may or may not be deemed "experimental" treatments). Most western countries except the USA have some form of universal healthcare system which pays for most, or all, of someone's essential healthcare costs, so this trope is less likely to be used (or justified) in those countries.

It is also often an optional treatment or a procedure that requires a specialized doctor to be brought in for any chance of success, skirting the law in that they're not ''refusing'' to give care because the patient is indigent, but not providing a specific ''kind'' of care. Experimental treatment that's only available in one country is also a popular justification; state or private insurance might cover the treatment itself, but probably not the plane tickets and other expenses. One also has to look at the time period involved -- some of those "duty to care" laws are relatively recent, or have had poor enforcement in the past. And in some cases, hospital administrators might believe it's cheaper to pay fines than bankrupt themselves over a particularly expensive patient.

to:

In countries that have little or no public health-care system, the financial cost of medical intervention or treatment can increase very rapidly. And a situation where the healthcare sector is [[UsefulNotes/Capitalism mostly or entirely run for profit]], as a vital operation can't be performed because result of a lack very poor or non-existent [[UsefulNotes/Socialism universal (publicly-provided or state-monitored) healthcare]], healthcare providers and insurers prioritise profit generation over the survival and wellbeing of money is just what the population.

Poor healthcare systems kill and ruin the lives of actual people, but are great fodder for
the RuleOfDrama ordered. Thus, if a story takes place in such a country (or given that working- and even in countries with social security) it is not unusual for one of the middle-class characters to can be motivated by just one perfectly ordinary accident (foreign body, broken bone, lopped-off finger) or medical condition (myopia, 'flu, diabetes) - let alone SoapOperaDisease - away from being completely bankrupted or dying.

Saving themselves or
a dying family member or friend afflicted by [[SoapOperaDisease some rare degenerative disease]]. Since the doctors won't give any treatment if member/lover/friend is a great motivation for a character to do (morally questionable) things that they are not otherwise might not, especially if money-grubbing private hospitals refuse to treat people without insurance unless they're paid cash upfront (the rarer (this does actually happen, sadly). Whether it's [[Workaholic working themselves to the disease, the more expensive the treatment), this character will have no choice but bone]], getting indebted [[LoanShark to participate shady characters]], participating in some game, tournament, borrow money [[TheMostDangerousGame gladiatorial blood-sports]], being a mercenary/hitman, or simply work night and day (not ruling out [[SingleMomStripper sex work]] even for a character who otherwise wouldn't consider such a thing), anything that will earn him enough money for the treatment. Failure may result in a MissingMom, DisappearedDad, and the likes.

Much as this trope is often a case of poor research, it
selling their body]] - [[HealthcareMotivation love can very well be TruthInTelevision, depending on the case.

In the US at least it is illegal
inspire them to deny care, even if the patient can't pay, but these laws often only apply to stabilizing a patient who needs emergency care. Some things are classed as aesthetic (fixing a cleft palate) and therefore optional, and some problems come up with organ transplants and certain pricey cancer treatments (which may or may not be deemed "experimental" treatments). Most western countries except the do all sorts of unusual things]].

The
USA ''does'' have some form of universal healthcare a (poor) public health system which pays covers emergency treatments. But AsYouKnow, many (tens of) thousands of deaths ensue annually from preventable or treatable conditions which are allowed to fester because they do not meet the 'emergency' criteria until they have passed the point by which the patient's life can actually be saved. Their public system is also notoriously miserly with 'aesthetic' conditions which do not significantly impair the patient's quality-of-life, and so-called 'experimental' treatments. Of the 35 OECD (Organisation for most, or all, Economic Co-operation and Development, which includes all but four of someone's essential healthcare costs, the world's wealthiest) countries only Mexico and the USA don't have Universal Healthcare (defined as curbing profit-seeking by providers and covering both preventative care and 'aesthetic' conditions), so this trope is less likely virtually absent in non-US international media.

One way of getting around the USA's public health system's criteria is
to be used (or justified) in those countries.

It is also often
make the curation of the patient's affliction an optional 'optional' treatment or a procedure that requires a specialized doctor to be brought in for any chance of success, skirting the federal law in that they're not ''refusing'' to give care because the patient is indigent, but not providing a specific ''kind'' of care. Experimental Even outside the USA, experimental treatment that's only available in one country is also a popular justification; way to make the HealthcareMotivation trope universal: state or private insurance might cover the treatment itself, but probably not the plane tickets and other expenses. One also has to look at the time period involved -- some of those "duty to care" laws are relatively recent, or have had poor enforcement in the past. And in some cases, hospital administrators might believe it's cheaper to pay fines than bankrupt themselves over a particularly expensive patient.
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