History Main / HatShop

24th Jun '17 7:23:32 PM nombretomado
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** It also seems to be popular in [[CanadaEh Canada]] and the northern United States when it's really cold outside. (Think ''{{Fargo}}''.)

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** It also seems to be popular in [[CanadaEh Canada]] and the northern United States when it's really cold outside. (Think ''{{Fargo}}''.''Film/{{Fargo}}''.)
18th Jun '17 11:59:58 AM karstovich2
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* A straw '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boater Boater]]''' (or "Skimmer"), with flat crown and brim, says "barbershop quartet member" or "Venetian gondolier" (it's called a ''boater'' for a reason). Accessorize with a brightly colored blazer or striped shirt, respectively. If you actually wear one, it's the summer equivalent to the homburg. In the early twentieth century, associated particularly with the U.S.A. Worn by butchers in England, with bow tie, striped shirt, and apron. Also English schoolboys, more so than the girls, historically they were part of school uniform and still are in some of the more stuffy private schools.
** On tv or in movies, particularly 1940's or 1950's flicks, boater wearing indicated naivety or a hick in the big city.

to:

* A straw '''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boater Boater]]''' (or "Skimmer"), with flat crown and brim, says "barbershop quartet member" or "Venetian gondolier" (it's called a ''boater'' for a reason). Accessorize with a brightly colored blazer or striped shirt, respectively. If you actually wear one, it's the summer equivalent to the homburg. In the early twentieth century, associated particularly with the U.S.A. Worn by butchers in England, with bow tie, striped shirt, and apron. Also English schoolboys, more so than the girls, historically they were part of school uniform and still are in some of the more stuffy stuffier private schools.
schools. This obtains in the U.S. to some degree, albeit with varying degrees of seriousness (for instance [[UsefulNotes/IvyLeague Princeton]]'s marching band has worn boaters as part of its uniform since the 1950s, but mostly as a laugh).
** On tv TV or in movies, particularly 1940's or 1950's flicks, boater wearing indicated naivety or a hick in the big city.
18th Jun '17 11:53:24 AM karstovich2
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** A specific style of hat, transitional between tricorne and bicorne: "I ''am'' Napoleon!".

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** A specific style of hat, transitional between tricorne bicorne (large and bicorne: worn "athwart" rather than "fore-and-aft"): "I ''am'' Napoleon!".Napoleon!".
18th Jun '17 11:50:41 AM karstovich2
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** "Trucker Hats", logo baseball caps with a plastic mesh back, are worn by--surprise--truckers, but also ironic hipsters and farmers.

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** "Trucker Hats", logo baseball caps with a plastic mesh back, are worn by--surprise--truckers, but also ironic farmers and hipsters and farmers.wearing them "ironically."
2nd Jun '17 9:37:01 AM FordPrefect
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* Italian hats are often sized in "punti", whose method of calculation is based on arcane, dark arts lost to the ages (read: I don't speak Italian and searches of English-language web pages turn up nothing). It appears to have some correlation to crown height as well as head circumference, but an Italian-speaking Troper will need to chime in on this one.

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* Italian hats are often sized in "punti", whose method of calculation is based on arcane, dark arts lost to the ages (read: I don't speak Italian and searches of English-language web pages turn up nothing). It [[http://hatsuk.com/hatsuk/hatsukhtml/bible/hatsize.htm appears to have have]] some correlation to crown height as well as head circumference, but an Italian-speaking Troper will need to chime in on this one.
31st May '17 9:40:29 PM karstovich2
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Historically, a top hat was not an automatic indication of wealth. Top hats were made for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver; these were called "stuff hats." By and large, "stuff hats" fell out of fashion as more practical hats became available. However, undertakers continued to wear black wool hats (like the one [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] likes to wear, apparently), as their profession demanded a certain formality in attire, but skilled-but-still-manual labourers, undertakers were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver. \\

to:

Historically, a top hat was not an automatic indication of wealth. Top hats were made for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver; these were called "stuff hats." By and large, "stuff hats" fell out of fashion as more practical hats became available. However, undertakers continued to wear black wool hats (like the one [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] likes to wear, apparently), as their profession apparently). Funeral customs demanded that undertakers have a certain formality in attire, but skilled-but-still-manual labourers, undertakers they were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver.beaver, so they bought the cheaper wool instead. \\
31st May '17 9:37:30 PM karstovich2
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The black wool ones popular with people [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] are for undertakers, as the formality of their profession required proper attire but they were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver. Other top hats for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver, were called "stuff hats" and fell out of fashion for non-mortuary working-class folk as other, more practical hats appeared on the scene. \\

to:

The Historically, a top hat was not an automatic indication of wealth. Top hats were made for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver; these were called "stuff hats." By and large, "stuff hats" fell out of fashion as more practical hats became available. However, undertakers continued to wear black wool ones popular with people hats (like the one [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] are for undertakers, as the formality of likes to wear, apparently), as their profession required proper attire demanded a certain formality in attire, but they skilled-but-still-manual labourers, undertakers were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver. Other top hats for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver, were called "stuff hats" and fell out of fashion for non-mortuary working-class folk as other, more practical hats appeared on the scene. beaver. \\
31st May '17 9:32:30 PM karstovich2
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* '''Top Hat''': An old way to tell if someone (most often, but not always a male) is rich. With overly/stereotypically wealthy garb, the Top Hat is a must. When these first appeared in the 1790s, they were generally made of glossy felted beaver fur; after 1800 or so, they started being made of silk, and by 1850 black silk was standard for high-end hats. The black wool ones popular with people [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] are for undertakers, as the formality of their profession required proper attire but they were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver. Other top hats for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver, were called "stuff hats" and fell out of fashion for non-mortuary working-class folk as other, more practical hats appeared on the scene. Light grey felt is another, slightly less formal option for daytime wear. Like the [[HighClassGlass monocle]], you'll never see this one unless someone being parodied, or unless there's an old style magician or [[DastardlyWhiplash mustache-twirling movie-serial villain]] in the crowd. (Technically, it's still the proper headwear for use with a morning coat, frock coat, or white-tie-and-tails, but these, too, appear virtually only in parody nowadays, so that anyone wearing the top hat is doing so improperly as a display of wealth, hence the image of the hat). It goes with the UnclePennybags image. Noteworthy in that it is sufficiently iconic that [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/awesomemonocle.jpg sticking one on top of a Smiley Face]] is enough for most observers to consider the resulting character as a wealthy male. The '''opera hat''' is a variant with a collapsible crown (originally meant for convenient storage while at the opera), which is good for magic tricks. A ''battered'' top hat (possibly with the crown mostly detached and sticking up like a tin lid) is the headgear of choice for Victorian tramps. Battered and ''dusty'' top hats were sometimes worn by characters in [[SpaghettiWestern Spaghetti Westerns]].

to:

* '''Top Hat''': An old way to tell if someone (most often, but not always a male) is rich. With overly/stereotypically wealthy garb, the Top Hat is a must. When these first appeared in the 1790s, they were generally made of glossy felted beaver fur; after 1800 or so, they started being made of silk, and by 1850 black silk was standard for high-end hats. Light grey felt is another, slightly less formal option for daytime wear; the HBO miniseries ''Series/JohnAdams'' shows this in full display for the [[UsefulNotes/JohnAdams title character]]'s wardrobe during the Washington Administration and his own presidency. \\
\\
The black wool ones popular with people [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] are for undertakers, as the formality of their profession required proper attire but they were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver. Other top hats for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver, were called "stuff hats" and fell out of fashion for non-mortuary working-class folk as other, more practical hats appeared on the scene. Light grey felt is another, slightly less formal option for daytime wear. \\
\\
Like the [[HighClassGlass monocle]], you'll never see this one unless someone being parodied, or unless there's an old style magician or [[DastardlyWhiplash mustache-twirling movie-serial villain]] in the crowd. (Technically, it's still the proper headwear for use with a morning coat, frock coat, or white-tie-and-tails, but these, too, appear virtually only in parody nowadays, so that anyone wearing the top hat is doing so improperly as a display of wealth, hence the image of the hat). It goes with the UnclePennybags image. Noteworthy in that it is sufficiently iconic that [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/awesomemonocle.jpg sticking one on top of a Smiley Face]] is enough for most observers to consider the resulting character as a wealthy male. The '''opera hat''' is a variant with a collapsible crown (originally meant for convenient storage while at the opera), which is good for magic tricks. A ''battered'' top hat (possibly with the crown mostly detached and sticking up like a tin lid) is the headgear of choice for Victorian tramps. Battered and ''dusty'' top hats were sometimes worn by characters in [[SpaghettiWestern Spaghetti Westerns]].
31st May '17 9:29:30 PM karstovich2
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* '''Top Hat''': An old way to tell if someone (most often, but not always a male) is rich. With overly/stereotypically wealthy garb, the Top Hat is a must. Originally made of glossy beaver fur, later generally of silk. (The black wool ones popular with people [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] are for undertakers.) Light grey felt is another, slightly less formal option for daytime wear. Like the [[HighClassGlass monocle]], you'll never see this one unless someone being parodied, or unless there's an old style magician or [[DastardlyWhiplash mustache-twirling movie-serial villain]] in the crowd. (Technically, it's still the proper headwear for use with a morning coat, frock coat, or white-tie-and-tails, but these, too, appear virtually only in parody nowadays, so that anyone wearing the top hat is doing so improperly as a display of wealth, hence the image of the hat). It goes with the UnclePennybags image. Noteworthy in that it is sufficiently iconic that [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/awesomemonocle.jpg sticking one on top of a Smiley Face]] is enough for most observers to consider the resulting character as a wealthy male. The '''opera hat''' is a variant with a collapsible crown (originally meant for convenient storage while at the opera), which is good for magic tricks. A ''battered'' top hat (possibly with the crown mostly detached and sticking up like a tin lid) is the headgear of choice for Victorian tramps. Battered and ''dusty'' top hats were sometimes worn by characters in [[SpaghettiWestern Spaghetti Westerns]].
** Example: On ''Series/TheDailyShow'', John Oliver occasionally wears a top hat, monocle, and tuxedo when he has to look demonstratively British.

to:

* '''Top Hat''': An old way to tell if someone (most often, but not always a male) is rich. With overly/stereotypically wealthy garb, the Top Hat is a must. Originally When these first appeared in the 1790s, they were generally made of glossy felted beaver fur, later generally fur; after 1800 or so, they started being made of silk. (The silk, and by 1850 black silk was standard for high-end hats. The black wool ones popular with people [[http://cdn.babble.com/famecrawler/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/david-beckham-victoria-beckham-royal-wedding2.jpg like David Beckham]] are for undertakers.) undertakers, as the formality of their profession required proper attire but they were generally not wealthy enough to afford silk or beaver. Other top hats for the low-end market, made of "lesser" materials than silk or beaver, were called "stuff hats" and fell out of fashion for non-mortuary working-class folk as other, more practical hats appeared on the scene. Light grey felt is another, slightly less formal option for daytime wear. Like the [[HighClassGlass monocle]], you'll never see this one unless someone being parodied, or unless there's an old style magician or [[DastardlyWhiplash mustache-twirling movie-serial villain]] in the crowd. (Technically, it's still the proper headwear for use with a morning coat, frock coat, or white-tie-and-tails, but these, too, appear virtually only in parody nowadays, so that anyone wearing the top hat is doing so improperly as a display of wealth, hence the image of the hat). It goes with the UnclePennybags image. Noteworthy in that it is sufficiently iconic that [[http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/awesomemonocle.jpg sticking one on top of a Smiley Face]] is enough for most observers to consider the resulting character as a wealthy male. The '''opera hat''' is a variant with a collapsible crown (originally meant for convenient storage while at the opera), which is good for magic tricks. A ''battered'' top hat (possibly with the crown mostly detached and sticking up like a tin lid) is the headgear of choice for Victorian tramps. Battered and ''dusty'' top hats were sometimes worn by characters in [[SpaghettiWestern Spaghetti Westerns]].
** Example: On ''Series/TheDailyShow'', ''Series/TheDailyShowWithJonStewart'', John Oliver occasionally wears wore a top hat, monocle, and tuxedo when he has to look demonstratively British.
30th May '17 2:05:58 PM Geoduck
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* A '''sombrero''' says Mexican outlaw (often from the Old West era). Commonly found SouthOfTheBorder, as well as in {{Spexico}}. A smaller, flat topped version, called the sombrero cordobés or gaucho hat, is closely associated with Zorro and other Spanish-speaking aristocrats.

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* A '''sombrero''' says [[{{Bandito}} Mexican outlaw outlaw]] (often from the Old West era). Commonly found SouthOfTheBorder, as well as in {{Spexico}}. A smaller, flat topped version, called the sombrero cordobés or gaucho hat, is closely associated with Zorro and other Spanish-speaking aristocrats.
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