History Main / HaroldLloyd

28th Jun '13 11:43:22 AM Dante668
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[[redirect:Redirect/HaroldLloyd]]

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[[redirect:Redirect/HaroldLloyd]][[redirect:Creator/HaroldLloyd]]
28th Jun '13 11:43:05 AM Dante668
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[[quoteright:220:[[Film/SafetyLast http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tvtropes-harold-lloyd_7418.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:220:And if you think this is daring, remember he's holding on with a mutilated hand.]]
Harold Lloyd was one of the biggest stars of Hollywood's silent film era. Along with Creator/CharlieChaplin and BusterKeaton (Lloyd is sometimes described as "The Third Genius" in reference to the other two actors), he dominated the silent comedy genre in the 1920s.

Lloyd started acting in high school. He made his film debut in 1913 and soon became partners with another up-and-comer, producer Hal Roach. Lloyd achieved fame with "Lonesome Luke", a fairly obvious imitation of Chaplin's Tramp character that nevertheless proved popular. However, Lloyd grew more ambitious and created his own persona, the "glasses" character that would be a movie fixture for twenty years. The "glasses" character, unlike Chaplin's tragicomic outsider and Keaton's somewhat cynical one, was more of an everyman, a determined, go-getting all-American type who usually got both the girl and the happy ending.

Lloyd split with Roach and became his own boss during his era of greatest success, the 1920s where he produced more feature films than Chaplin and Keaton. Unlike those rivals, he never took credit as a writer or director of his films despite closely controlling all aspects of production. His films during these years became famous for thrilling, elaborate stuntwork and long chase sequences, all of which were performed by Lloyd himself.

Lloyd attempted to adapt the Glasses Character for talkies but met with gradually diminishing returns and was essentially retired by 1938. He held the copyright to most of his features and was reluctant to show them in revivals or on television, and consequently his reputation diminshed over the decades. Some of Lloyd's features were released on video in the early 1990s, and a DVD collection of features and shorts was finally released in 2005.

----
'''Lloyd films with their own pages:'''
* ''Film/TheFreshman''
* ''Film/SafetyLast''
* ''Film/TheKidBrother''
* ''Film/NeverWeaken''

----
!!His other movies provide examples of:
* BananaPeel: ''The Flirt'' (1917).
* BananaRepublic: Lloyd goes to one in ''Why Worry?'' and ends up in the middle of a revolution.
* BigApplesauce: ''Speedy'' was filmed on location.
* TheCameo: BabeRuth in ''Speedy''. Yep.
* CaptainErsatz: Lonesome Luke.
* ConstructionZoneCalamity: ''Never Weaken''
* TheDanza: His characters were usually named "Harold".
* FakeOutOpening: Many of his films start with a misleading opening as a gag.
* FlippingTheBird: In ''Speedy''. In 1928. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4w77jd1KEQ To his own reflection in a mirror.]]
* FunWithSubtitles: To a far greater extent than Keaton or Chaplin, Lloyd used the title cards for gags.
** To the point that's it's almost overwritten, like Creator/WoodyAllen (who was clearly influenced by Lloyd).
* HappyEnding: almost all of them.
* HollywoodDriving: ''Speedy''.
* IconicOutfit: The horn rim glasses, to the point where Lloyd could walk around unrecognized when he wasn't wearing them (they were a prop, he didn't need them to see).
** Usually, though not always, accompanied by a [[NiceHat straw hat]].
* InterruptedSuicide: in the short film ''Never Weaken'', Harold decides to kill himself after a misunderstanding leads him to believe his girl is marrying another. It goes hilariously wrong.
* LiteralCliffhanger: Much of the climactic building-climbing sequence to ''Safety Last'', including the famous image of Lloyd hanging from the hands of a giant clock.
* MagicFeather: The "magic amulet" in ''Grandma's Boy''.
* {{Meganekko}}: Arguably the most iconic male example of the trope.
* NitroBoost: In the short ''Get Out and Get Under'', Lloyd gives his car heroin to make it go faster. Presumably he was not all that familiar with the effects of heroin.
* NoNameGiven: if his characters weren't called "Harold" they were called "The Boy".
* NotSoFakePropWeapon: RealLife. In 1919 Lloyd was posing for photographs with a prop bomb. Unfortunately the not-prop bomb exploded, blowing off the thumb and first two fingers of his right hand. For the rest of his career, including all of the intricate action sequences that were such a hallmark of his 1920s films, Lloyd performed while wearing a specially-made glove designed to hide his injury.
* NoStuntDouble: Even after the injury above, this still applied.
* RealVehicleReveal: In one HaroldLloyd film, Harold is seen relaxing in the back of a rather luxurious car. Then he shifts position, the car pulls away, and it's revealed he's riding a ''bicycle.''
* RevealShot: Harold Lloyd loved using this for gags and did it many times.
* ThrowItIn: Harold's horse-drawn trolley colliding with an elevated rail pillar in ''Speedy'' was not scripted.
* WagTheDirector: Lloyd was in charge of his movies. Of course, since many of them went down as classics, this is an unusually happy example of this trope.
* WeddingDeadline: Harold's epic race to stop his girl from marrying a cad in ''Girl Shy''.
----
!!Harold Lloyd {{Shout Out}}s in fiction:
* The main character in the animated ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' was a mix between Harold Lloyd and JamesStewart.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'': In the episode "Emperor Joker!", one of the Joker's {{mook}}s is a [[http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/2443740.html huge, muscular version of Lloyd]], [[ShownTheirWork with a prosthetic hand]] (he tries to punch Batman with it. Blink and you might not realize it's prosthetic).
* ''{{Futurama}}'': Zoidberg's uncle Harold Zoid (voiced by Hank Azaria), a former silent film star, is a reference to Lloyd.
* {{Martin Scorsese}}'s ''Film/{{Hugo}}'' includes the famous ''Safety Last'' scene pictured above, and in a later scene Hugo dangles from a clock.
* JackieChan also copied the clock scene from ''Safety Last'' in ''Project A'', as well as scenes from BusterKeaton's ''Sherlock Jr.'' and ''SteamboatBillJr'' and Creator/CharlieChaplin's ''Film/ModernTimes''. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdiNGHL99YM Compare the scenes here]].
* The plot of the film ''WesternAnimation/CatsDontDance'' borrows heavily from Harold Loyd's 1932 talkie ''Movie Crazy''.
----

to:

[[quoteright:220:[[Film/SafetyLast http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/tvtropes-harold-lloyd_7418.jpg]]]]
[[caption-width-right:220:And if you think this is daring, remember he's holding on with a mutilated hand.]]
Harold Lloyd was one of the biggest stars of Hollywood's silent film era. Along with Creator/CharlieChaplin and BusterKeaton (Lloyd is sometimes described as "The Third Genius" in reference to the other two actors), he dominated the silent comedy genre in the 1920s.

Lloyd started acting in high school. He made his film debut in 1913 and soon became partners with another up-and-comer, producer Hal Roach. Lloyd achieved fame with "Lonesome Luke", a fairly obvious imitation of Chaplin's Tramp character that nevertheless proved popular. However, Lloyd grew more ambitious and created his own persona, the "glasses" character that would be a movie fixture for twenty years. The "glasses" character, unlike Chaplin's tragicomic outsider and Keaton's somewhat cynical one, was more of an everyman, a determined, go-getting all-American type who usually got both the girl and the happy ending.

Lloyd split with Roach and became his own boss during his era of greatest success, the 1920s where he produced more feature films than Chaplin and Keaton. Unlike those rivals, he never took credit as a writer or director of his films despite closely controlling all aspects of production. His films during these years became famous for thrilling, elaborate stuntwork and long chase sequences, all of which were performed by Lloyd himself.

Lloyd attempted to adapt the Glasses Character for talkies but met with gradually diminishing returns and was essentially retired by 1938. He held the copyright to most of his features and was reluctant to show them in revivals or on television, and consequently his reputation diminshed over the decades. Some of Lloyd's features were released on video in the early 1990s, and a DVD collection of features and shorts was finally released in 2005.

----
'''Lloyd films with their own pages:'''
* ''Film/TheFreshman''
* ''Film/SafetyLast''
* ''Film/TheKidBrother''
* ''Film/NeverWeaken''

----
!!His other movies provide examples of:
* BananaPeel: ''The Flirt'' (1917).
* BananaRepublic: Lloyd goes to one in ''Why Worry?'' and ends up in the middle of a revolution.
* BigApplesauce: ''Speedy'' was filmed on location.
* TheCameo: BabeRuth in ''Speedy''. Yep.
* CaptainErsatz: Lonesome Luke.
* ConstructionZoneCalamity: ''Never Weaken''
* TheDanza: His characters were usually named "Harold".
* FakeOutOpening: Many of his films start with a misleading opening as a gag.
* FlippingTheBird: In ''Speedy''. In 1928. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4w77jd1KEQ To his own reflection in a mirror.]]
* FunWithSubtitles: To a far greater extent than Keaton or Chaplin, Lloyd used the title cards for gags.
** To the point that's it's almost overwritten, like Creator/WoodyAllen (who was clearly influenced by Lloyd).
* HappyEnding: almost all of them.
* HollywoodDriving: ''Speedy''.
* IconicOutfit: The horn rim glasses, to the point where Lloyd could walk around unrecognized when he wasn't wearing them (they were a prop, he didn't need them to see).
** Usually, though not always, accompanied by a [[NiceHat straw hat]].
* InterruptedSuicide: in the short film ''Never Weaken'', Harold decides to kill himself after a misunderstanding leads him to believe his girl is marrying another. It goes hilariously wrong.
* LiteralCliffhanger: Much of the climactic building-climbing sequence to ''Safety Last'', including the famous image of Lloyd hanging from the hands of a giant clock.
* MagicFeather: The "magic amulet" in ''Grandma's Boy''.
* {{Meganekko}}: Arguably the most iconic male example of the trope.
* NitroBoost: In the short ''Get Out and Get Under'', Lloyd gives his car heroin to make it go faster. Presumably he was not all that familiar with the effects of heroin.
* NoNameGiven: if his characters weren't called "Harold" they were called "The Boy".
* NotSoFakePropWeapon: RealLife. In 1919 Lloyd was posing for photographs with a prop bomb. Unfortunately the not-prop bomb exploded, blowing off the thumb and first two fingers of his right hand. For the rest of his career, including all of the intricate action sequences that were such a hallmark of his 1920s films, Lloyd performed while wearing a specially-made glove designed to hide his injury.
* NoStuntDouble: Even after the injury above, this still applied.
* RealVehicleReveal: In one HaroldLloyd film, Harold is seen relaxing in the back of a rather luxurious car. Then he shifts position, the car pulls away, and it's revealed he's riding a ''bicycle.''
* RevealShot: Harold Lloyd loved using this for gags and did it many times.
* ThrowItIn: Harold's horse-drawn trolley colliding with an elevated rail pillar in ''Speedy'' was not scripted.
* WagTheDirector: Lloyd was in charge of his movies. Of course, since many of them went down as classics, this is an unusually happy example of this trope.
* WeddingDeadline: Harold's epic race to stop his girl from marrying a cad in ''Girl Shy''.
----
!!Harold Lloyd {{Shout Out}}s in fiction:
* The main character in the animated ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' was a mix between Harold Lloyd and JamesStewart.
* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'': In the episode "Emperor Joker!", one of the Joker's {{mook}}s is a [[http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/2443740.html huge, muscular version of Lloyd]], [[ShownTheirWork with a prosthetic hand]] (he tries to punch Batman with it. Blink and you might not realize it's prosthetic).
* ''{{Futurama}}'': Zoidberg's uncle Harold Zoid (voiced by Hank Azaria), a former silent film star, is a reference to Lloyd.
* {{Martin Scorsese}}'s ''Film/{{Hugo}}'' includes the famous ''Safety Last'' scene pictured above, and in a later scene Hugo dangles from a clock.
* JackieChan also copied the clock scene from ''Safety Last'' in ''Project A'', as well as scenes from BusterKeaton's ''Sherlock Jr.'' and ''SteamboatBillJr'' and Creator/CharlieChaplin's ''Film/ModernTimes''. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdiNGHL99YM Compare the scenes here]].
* The plot of the film ''WesternAnimation/CatsDontDance'' borrows heavily from Harold Loyd's 1932 talkie ''Movie Crazy''.
----
[[redirect:Redirect/HaroldLloyd]]
6th Jun '13 1:14:44 PM kchishol
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Added DiffLines:

[[caption-width-right:220:And if you think this is daring, remember he's holding on with a mutilated hand.]]
29th Apr '13 10:04:00 PM TheWildWestPyro
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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'': In the episode "Emperor Joker!", one of the Joker's {{mook}}s is a huge, muscular version of Lloyd, [[ShownTheirWork with a prosthetic hand]] (he tries to punch Batman with it. Blink and you might not realize it's prosthetic).

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheBraveAndTheBold'': In the episode "Emperor Joker!", one of the Joker's {{mook}}s is a [[http://scans-daily.dreamwidth.org/2443740.html huge, muscular version of Lloyd, Lloyd]], [[ShownTheirWork with a prosthetic hand]] (he tries to punch Batman with it. Blink and you might not realize it's prosthetic).
17th Feb '13 2:15:32 PM Exxolon
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Harold Lloyd was one of the biggest stars of Hollywood's silent film era. Along with Creator/CharlieChaplin and BusterKeaton, he dominated the silent comedy genre in the 1920s.

to:

Harold Lloyd was one of the biggest stars of Hollywood's silent film era. Along with Creator/CharlieChaplin and BusterKeaton, BusterKeaton (Lloyd is sometimes described as "The Third Genius" in reference to the other two actors), he dominated the silent comedy genre in the 1920s.
31st Jan '13 7:39:46 AM SeptimusHeap
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* IconicOutfit: The horn rim glasses, to the point where Lloyd could walk around unrecognized when he wasn't wearing them (they were a prop, he didn't need them to see).
** Usually, though not always, accompanied by a [[NiceHat straw hat]].



* MemeticOutfit: The horn rim glasses, to the point where Lloyd could walk around unrecognized when he wasn't wearing them (they were a prop, he didn't need them to see).
** Usually, though not always, accompanied by a [[NiceHat straw hat]].
15th Jan '13 6:58:51 PM nombretomado
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** To the point that's it's almost overwritten, like WoodyAllen (who was clearly influenced by Lloyd).

to:

** To the point that's it's almost overwritten, like WoodyAllen Creator/WoodyAllen (who was clearly influenced by Lloyd).
13th Jan '13 1:14:41 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* RealVehicleReveal: In one HaroldLloyd film, Harold is seen relaxing in the back of a rather luxurious car. Then he shifts position, the car pulls away, and it's revealed he's riding a ''bicycle.''
3rd Jan '13 5:40:17 AM mongol
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* ''Film/TheKidBrother''



* BigBallOfViolence: This happens when Harold finally stands up to the town bully in ''The Kid Brother''.
* BookEnds: The wrecked ship in the river that pops up in the background of an early scene in ''The Kid Brother'' is the location of the climactic fight.



* [[EverythingsBetterWithMonkeys Everything's Better With Monkeys]]: Averted. One in a sailor suit causes much trouble for Harold in ''The Kid Brother''.



* FunWithSubtitles: In ''The Kid Brother'' Harold keeps calling out to the girl he likes as she walks farther and farther away, leading to a title card with a tiny "Goodbye" in the center of the screen.
** To a far greater extent than Keaton or Chaplin, Lloyd used the title cards for gags.
*** To the point that's it's almost overwritten, like WoodyAllen (who was clearly influenced by Lloyd).

to:

* FunWithSubtitles: In ''The Kid Brother'' Harold keeps calling out to the girl he likes as she walks farther and farther away, leading to a title card with a tiny "Goodbye" in the center of the screen.
**
To a far greater extent than Keaton or Chaplin, Lloyd used the title cards for gags.
*** ** To the point that's it's almost overwritten, like WoodyAllen (who was clearly influenced by Lloyd).



* MedicineShow: ''The Kid Brother''.



* MissingMom: ''The Kid Brother''.



* WellDoneSonGuy: ''The Kid Brother''. "Son, you're a real Hickory."
30th Dec '12 1:39:05 AM Surenity
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Added DiffLines:

* The plot of the film ''WesternAnimation/CatsDontDance'' borrows heavily from Harold Loyd's 1932 talkie ''Movie Crazy''.
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