History Main / HappyBirthdayToYou

2nd Feb '16 8:56:03 AM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In ''Anime/SuzysZooDaisukiWitzy'', the English dub used an original birthday song:
to:
* In ''Anime/SuzysZooDaisukiWitzy'', the English dub used an original birthday song:song in the episode ''Surprise, Witzy!'':
2nd Feb '16 8:49:26 AM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* In ''Anime/SuzysZooDaisukiWitzy'', the English dub used an original birthday song: -->''It's your birthday Witzy/What a happy way/to celebrate a piece of cake/and play the day away''.
29th Jan '16 9:35:26 PM TrendingToon1
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
** Averted in the episode "Whose Birthday Is It?", when the cast sings the traditional Happy Birthday song to Swiper.
29th Jan '16 12:55:47 PM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* [[TGIOChiliBees Chain restaurants like Applebee's, Bennigan's, and TGI Friday's]] usually make a fuss over customer birthdays, but the staff must sing an original corporate birthday song or chant because it is a "public performance"; if they were to sing "Happy Birthday" it would have to be licensed and paid for. ** Since, as previously mentioned, it's only the ''lyrics'' that are copyrighted, not the melody (although apparently you can still be sued for translations, as noted with ''Star Trek'' performing it in Klingon above), this tends not to be the case at foreign-food places; for example, a certain Italian chain restaurant sings a Pavarotti-esque rendition of ''Happy Birthday'' in Italian, albeit with the lyrics completely changed as opposed to a straight literal translation to avoid any chances of a lawsuit.
to:
* [[TGIOChiliBees [[KitschyThemedRestaurant Chain restaurants like Applebee's, Bennigan's, and TGI Friday's]] usually make a fuss over customer birthdays, but the staff must sing an original corporate birthday song or chant because it is a "public performance"; if they were to sing "Happy Birthday" it would have to be licensed and paid for. ** for. Since, as previously mentioned, it's only the ''lyrics'' that are copyrighted, not the melody (although apparently you can still be sued for translations, as noted with ''Star Trek'' performing it in Klingon above), this tends not to be the case at foreign-food places; for example, a certain Italian chain restaurant sings a Pavarotti-esque rendition of ''Happy Birthday'' "Happy Birthday" in Italian, albeit with the lyrics completely changed as opposed to a straight literal translation to avoid any chances of a lawsuit.
22nd Jan '16 3:53:49 AM C2
Is there an issue? Send a Message
In 2013, a lawsuit was filed against Warner/Chappell Music by one Jennifer Nelson, whose production company, Good Morning to You Productions, was filming a documentary about the song and its history. To secure the rights to the song and ensure the documentary would be made, Nelson had to pay $1,500, which she claimed was unreasonable. In 2015, evidence was found that the copyright claim made by Warner/Chappell was false, with the discovery of documents "mistakenly held from them" by Warner/Chappell, including a book published in 1922 titled ''The Everyday Song Book''. The book contained the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" with a disclaimer that they had been used with "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F Summy Co.[[note]]which was bought by Warner Music Group in 1988[[/note]]"... which wasn't a valid copyright notice, which was required at the time of publishing. As a result, Nelson's lawyers, Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin claimed Warner/Chappell did not own the rights to the lyrics -- and on September 22, 2015, a U.S. [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts District Court Judge]] [[http://www.shadesofgraylaw.com/media/00065570.pdf agreed with them]], ruling Warner/Chappell's copyright claim officially invalid (subject to appeal). However, this does not invalidate any other potential copyright claims, so the lyrics are legally an "orphan work" in the U.S. for now, with the possibility someone else may present a valid claim. As of this writing, the heirs of the Hill sisters are attempting to claim the copyright themselves, although their claim hasn't been validated.
to:
In 2013, a lawsuit was filed against Warner/Chappell Music by one Jennifer Nelson, whose production company, Good Morning to You Productions, was filming a documentary about the song and its history. To secure the rights to the song and ensure the documentary would be made, Nelson had to pay $1,500, which she claimed was unreasonable. In 2015, evidence was found that the copyright claim made by Warner/Chappell was false, with the discovery of documents "mistakenly held from them" by Warner/Chappell, including a book published in 1922 titled ''The Everyday Song Book''. The book contained the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" with a disclaimer that they had been used with "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F Summy Co.[[note]]which was bought by Warner Music Group in 1988[[/note]]"... which wasn't a valid copyright notice, which was required at the time of publishing. As a result, Nelson's lawyers, Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin claimed Warner/Chappell did not own the rights to the lyrics -- and on September 22, 2015, a U.S. [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts District Court Judge]] [[http://www.shadesofgraylaw.com/media/00065570.pdf agreed with them]], ruling Warner/Chappell's copyright claim officially invalid (subject to (with a settlement between the parties involved precluding any further appeal). However, this does not invalidate any other potential copyright claims, so the lyrics are legally an "orphan work" in the U.S. for now, with the possibility someone else may present a valid claim. As of this writing, the heirs of the Hill sisters are attempting to claim the copyright themselves, although their claim hasn't been validated.
19th Dec '15 7:39:52 PM Pichu-kun
Is there an issue? Send a Message
to:
\n* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitansGo'' involves Beast Boy's birthday. Robin keeps on breaking the forth wall about how the characters can't afford the normal "Happy Birthday" song. However due to the AnimationLeadTime the episode came out after the copyrights expired.
5th Dec '15 3:42:48 PM HaggisMcCrablice
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* For his birthday [[CoolMcCool Harry McCool]] is serenaded with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=acLrtFAYzx8&list=PL332D1CA63ACE883A&index=181 this]] original version.
27th Nov '15 11:44:39 PM C2
Is there an issue? Send a Message
In 2013, a lawsuit was filed against Warner/Chappell Music by one Jennifer Nelson, whose production company, Good Morning to You Productions, was filming a documentary about the song and its history. To secure the rights to the song and ensure the documentary would be made, Nelson had to pay $1,500, which she claimed was unreasonable. In 2015, evidence was found that the copyright claim made by Warner/Chappell was false, with the discovery of documents "mistakenly held from them" by Warner/Chappell, including a book published in 1922 titled ''The Everyday Song Book''. The book contained the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" with a disclaimer that they had been used with "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F Summy Co.[[note]]which was bought by Warner Music Group in 1988[[/note]]"... which wasn't a valid copyright notice, which was required at the time of publishing. As a result, Nelson's lawyers, Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin claimed Warner/Chappell did not own the rights to the lyrics -- and on September 22, 2015, a U.S. [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts District Court Judge]] [[http://www.shadesofgraylaw.com/media/00065570.pdf agreed with them]], ruling Warner/Chappell's copyright claim officially invalid. However, this does not invalidate any other potential copyright claims, so the lyrics are legally an "orphan work" in the U.S. for now, with the possibility someone else may present a valid claim. As of this writing, the heirs of the Hill sisters are attempting to claim the copyright themselves, although their claim hasn't been validated.
to:
In 2013, a lawsuit was filed against Warner/Chappell Music by one Jennifer Nelson, whose production company, Good Morning to You Productions, was filming a documentary about the song and its history. To secure the rights to the song and ensure the documentary would be made, Nelson had to pay $1,500, which she claimed was unreasonable. In 2015, evidence was found that the copyright claim made by Warner/Chappell was false, with the discovery of documents "mistakenly held from them" by Warner/Chappell, including a book published in 1922 titled ''The Everyday Song Book''. The book contained the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" with a disclaimer that they had been used with "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F Summy Co.[[note]]which was bought by Warner Music Group in 1988[[/note]]"... which wasn't a valid copyright notice, which was required at the time of publishing. As a result, Nelson's lawyers, Betsy Manifold and Mark Rifkin claimed Warner/Chappell did not own the rights to the lyrics -- and on September 22, 2015, a U.S. [[UsefulNotes/AmericanCourts District Court Judge]] [[http://www.shadesofgraylaw.com/media/00065570.pdf agreed with them]], ruling Warner/Chappell's copyright claim officially invalid.invalid (subject to appeal). However, this does not invalidate any other potential copyright claims, so the lyrics are legally an "orphan work" in the U.S. for now, with the possibility someone else may present a valid claim. As of this writing, the heirs of the Hill sisters are attempting to claim the copyright themselves, although their claim hasn't been validated.
22nd Nov '15 6:54:01 PM MHarrington
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* In one episode of the the Canadian sketch show, ''Series/TheRedGreenShow'', Red visits his nephew Harold at his office job in the city on his birthday. Red brings Harold a present: his old video effects switcher from the show. Red has Harold press a button on the switcher, which plays a MinskyPickup-type sound. Then along come several other members of Possum Lodge to sing "Happy Birthday" to Harold, but they sing out of tune and hold several notes for long periods of time. Harold is so embarrassed at this site that he picks up the phone on his desk and calls security.
14th Nov '15 3:34:21 PM smalltime
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDragonJakeLong'' episode "Bite Father, Bite Son" has a similar birthday song. Same melody, but slightly different lyrics.
to:
* The ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDragonJakeLong'' episode "Bite Father, Bite Son" has a similar birthday song.song to the one in ''Disney/TheEmperorsNewGroove''. Same melody, but slightly different lyrics.
This list shows the last 10 events of 140. Show all.