History Main / HappyBirthdayToYou

24th Jan '17 2:33:30 PM dsneybuf
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When Michelle sings "Happy Birthday" to herself in the ''Webcomic/ScrambledEggs'' comic "Leap of Doom," she uses the lyrics for the ThisLoserIsYou version. (Happy birthday to you, you live in a zoo…)

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* When Michelle sings "Happy Birthday" to herself in the ''Webcomic/ScrambledEggs'' comic "Leap of Doom," she uses the lyrics for the ThisLoserIsYou version. (Happy birthday to you, you live in a zoo…)
24th Jan '17 2:33:00 PM dsneybuf
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When Michelle sings "Happy Birthday" to herself in the ''Webcomic/ScrambledEggs'' comic "Leap of Doom," she uses the lyrics for the ThisLoserIsYou version. (Happy birthday to you, you live in a zoo…)



* When Michelle sings "Happy Birthday" to herself in the ''[[Website/PlatypusComix Scrambled Eggs]]'' comic "Leap of Doom," she uses the lyrics for the ThisLoserIsYou version. (Happy birthday to you, you live in a zoo…)
22nd Jan '17 12:21:31 AM Xtifr
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* In ''Series/CurbYourEnthusiasm'', LarryDavid refuses to sing the song at Ben Stillers birthday party. HilarityEnsues.

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* In ''Series/CurbYourEnthusiasm'', LarryDavid Creator/LarryDavid refuses to sing the song at Ben Stillers birthday party. HilarityEnsues.
9th Jan '17 6:44:28 PM JMQwilleran
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* ''WesternAnimation/BeatBugs'' doesn't use this for its birthday episode. But then again, would you use this when your show has the rights to use "Birthday" by Music/TheBeatles?
27th Dec '16 9:44:01 PM Scorpio3002
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* ''Film/Passengers2016'' has Jim program a bunch of robots to sing this to Aurora, commemorating the anniversary of her waking up.
12th Dec '16 1:06:33 PM MarkLungo
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It's the most-recognized song in the English language, but [[http://money.cnn.com/2015/09/22/media/warner-happy-birthday-to-you/index.html?sr=fb092215happybirthdaymoney940pStoryLink before September 22, 2015]], the lyrics to "Happy Birthday to You" ''weren't'' in the public domain in most countries[[labelnote:*]] (Canada was a major exception; the "Happy Birthday" copyright expired there in 1985)[[/labelnote]]. Its copyright in the United States and Continental Europe was held by Warner Music Group, which had acquired it in 1988 from its takeover of the original holder. [[note]] It's worth mentioning that the melody itself comes from "Good Morning To All", a much older song which everyone agrees has been in the public domain for close to a century.[[/note]] WMG aggressively enforced the copyright, too, which netted them around $2 million per year in royalty fees. As a result, when a birthday is being celebrated on television, it's fairly rare for those involved to actually sing "Happy Birthday to You".

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It's the most-recognized song in the English language, but [[http://money.cnn.com/2015/09/22/media/warner-happy-birthday-to-you/index.html?sr=fb092215happybirthdaymoney940pStoryLink before September 22, 2015]], the lyrics to "Happy Birthday to You" ''weren't'' in the public domain in most countries[[labelnote:*]] countries[[note]] (Canada was a major exception; the "Happy Birthday" copyright expired there in 1985)[[/labelnote]]. 1985)[[/note]]. Its copyright in the United States and Continental Europe was held by Warner Music Group, Warner/Chappell Music, a division of Creator/WarnerMusicGroup, which had acquired it in 1988 from its takeover of the original holder. [[note]] It's worth mentioning that the melody itself comes from "Good Morning To All", a much older song which everyone agrees has been in the public domain for close to a century.[[/note]] WMG aggressively enforced the copyright, too, which netted them around $2 million per year in royalty fees. As a result, when a birthday is being celebrated on television, it's fairly rare for those involved to actually sing "Happy Birthday to You".



The fact that a little ditty sung thousands of times a day around the world, and which only contains five words (not counting the person's name), was subject to copyright laws was serious SnarkBait for decades. The fact that you could've been sued for realistically portraying an Anglophone birthday party is mind-boggling. Even foreign language translations were not exempt -- ''Series/StarTrek'' writers found out that even showing it in [[ConstructedLanguage Klingon]] would cost them.[[note]] However, given that only the lyrics were under copyright, another Klingon phrase set to the same tune would be fair game.[[/note]] This case of copyright laws run amok was often subject to LampshadeHanging, which was really all anyone could do, as WMG was expected to hold the rights to he lyrics until 2031 at the earliest. [[note]] This makes very little sense because the first publication of the lyrics was around 1911. United States copyright law states that almost everything published before 1923 is in the public domain by default. "Happy Birthday", however, had a loophole in that a separate copyright claim was filed in 1935, and Patty Hill (the last living original rightsholder) died in 1946.[[/note]]

That all changed in TheNewTens. In 2013, a lawsuit was filed against Warner/Chappell Music by Jennifer Nelson, whose production company, Good Morning to You Productions, was filming a documentary about the song and its history. To secure the rights to the song and ensure the documentary would be made, Nelson had to pay $1500, which she claimed was unreasonable. During pretrial hearings in 2015 – one day before a scheduled ruling, in fact – Nelson and her lawyers discovered evidence that WMG's copyright claim was likely invalid thanks to the discovery of documents "[[BlatantLies mistakenly held from them]]" by WMG, including a book published in 1922 titled ''The Everyday Song Book''. That book contained the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" with a disclaimer that they had been used with "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F Summy Co."[[labelnote:†]] (that's the company whose IP Warner Music Group ended up with in 1988)[[/labelnote]] …but that's not a valid copyright notice, which was required at the time of publishing. [[note]] ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead'' had a similar issue; it was distributed to cinemas without a copyright notice, thus accidentally and automatically releasing it (and by extension pretty much all of the core zombie/undead mythos) into the public domain. That loophole and several others were closed in the 1976 Copyright Act, but the law isn't retroactive. Plus, when it comes to lawsuits over old intellectual properties, American judges look at what the law ''used'' to be during the time period in question, rather than what it is now.[[/note]]

to:

The fact that a little ditty sung thousands of times a day around the world, and which only contains five words (not counting the person's name), was subject to copyright laws was serious SnarkBait for decades. The fact that you could've been sued for realistically portraying an Anglophone birthday party is mind-boggling. Even foreign language translations were not exempt -- ''Series/StarTrek'' ''Franchise/StarTrek'' writers found out that even showing it in [[ConstructedLanguage Klingon]] would cost them.[[note]] However, given that only the lyrics were under copyright, another Klingon phrase set to the same tune would be fair game.[[/note]] This case of copyright laws run amok was often subject to LampshadeHanging, which was really all anyone could do, as WMG was expected to hold the rights to he lyrics until 2031 at the earliest. [[note]] This makes very little sense because the first publication of the lyrics was around 1911. United States copyright law states that almost everything published before 1923 is in the public domain by default. "Happy Birthday", however, had a loophole in that a separate copyright claim was filed in 1935, and Patty Hill (the last living original rightsholder) died in 1946.[[/note]]

That all changed in TheNewTens. In 2013, a lawsuit was filed against Warner/Chappell Music by Jennifer Nelson, whose production company, Good Morning to You Productions, was filming a documentary about the song and its history. To secure the rights to the song and ensure the documentary would be made, Nelson had to pay $1500, which she claimed was unreasonable. During pretrial hearings in 2015 – one day before a scheduled ruling, in fact – Nelson and her lawyers discovered evidence that WMG's copyright claim was likely invalid thanks to the discovery of documents "[[BlatantLies mistakenly held from them]]" by WMG, including a book published in 1922 titled ''The Everyday Song Book''. That book contained the lyrics to "Happy Birthday" with a disclaimer that they had been used with "special permission through courtesy of the Clayton F Summy Co."[[labelnote:†]] "[[note]] (that's the company whose IP Warner Music Group ended up with in 1988)[[/labelnote]] 1988)[[/note]] …but that's not a valid copyright notice, which was required at the time of publishing. [[note]] ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead'' had a similar issue; it was distributed to cinemas without a copyright notice, thus accidentally and automatically releasing it (and by extension pretty much all of the core zombie/undead mythos) into the public domain. That loophole and several others were closed in the 1976 Copyright Act, but the law isn't retroactive. Plus, when it comes to lawsuits over old intellectual properties, American judges look at what the law ''used'' to be during the time period in question, rather than what it is now.[[/note]]
10th Nov '16 6:47:36 PM mimitchi33
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* ''[[VideoGame/PriPara [=PriPara=]]]'' has two original birthday songs-"Lucky! Surprise Birthday", which was the first song performed in Dream Theater, and "Thank You Birthday", which was the ending theme of an episode about Laala's birthday.
6th Nov '16 12:35:11 PM wootzits
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* In an episode of ''Anime/SgtFrog'', Keroro gets Mutsumi to compose an original birthday song for Natsumi's surprise party. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the English dub, where Keroro tells Mutsumi that he's in charge of "non-copyright-infringing birthday song composition".

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* In an episode of ''Anime/SgtFrog'', ''Manga/SgtFrog'', Keroro gets Mutsumi to compose an original birthday song for Natsumi's surprise party. {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the English dub, where Keroro tells Mutsumi that he's in charge of "non-copyright-infringing birthday song composition".
1st Nov '16 8:06:49 PM KoopaKid17
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheBerenstainBears'' entitled "Too Much Birthday" (based on the book of the same name) has everyone sing to the tune of "LondonBridge,"

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheBerenstainBears'' entitled "Too Much Birthday" (based on the book of the same name) has everyone sing to the tune of "LondonBridge,""LondonBridge":
31st Oct '16 5:26:41 PM legoking831
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** In addition, the ''actual'' Happy Birthday song was actually sung on at least one episode (the fifth "Pets" episode), in a rare aversion to this trope. The reasons it was possible was likely the same as the ''Sesame Street'' example mentioned above.
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