History Main / GridInventory

20th Nov '16 9:50:59 PM nicocoro
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* There is a tongue-in-cheek Flash game with this as the primary element - you play as the put-upon squire to a larger-than-life adventurer knight, and have to play inventory Tetris with the loot from his adventuring to equip him for the fight with the MonsterOfTheWeek.

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* There is a tongue-in-cheek Flash game called ''Help the Hero!'' with this as the primary element - you play as the put-upon squire to a larger-than-life adventurer knight, and have to play inventory Tetris with the loot from his adventuring to equip him for the fight with the MonsterOfTheWeek.
23rd Oct '16 3:11:04 AM eroock
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_deus_ex_human_revolution_inventory.png]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_deus_ex_human_revolution_inventory.org/pmwiki/pub/images/deus_ex_human_revolution_inventory.png]]]]
22nd Oct '16 10:31:54 PM AnotherDuck
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** The first ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' game (although ammo was mysteriously stored elsewhere), the second switched to a list inventory. A bug in the first game allows one to exploit a glitch and stack inventory items on top of each other.
*** ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'' brings back the grid inventory, and even allows you to upgrade inventory space, but now makes ammo take up space. The game will automatically reposition items for the best fit, though.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' series. The first also had the rather painful restriction that ''gold'' (in stacks of up to 5,000, though double this with the right and otherwise useless amulet in the unofficial expansion pack) took up precious inventory space. Few items were actually worth more than their gold worth, which made them that much more precious.
** And its {{Spiritual Successor}}s ''Mythos'' and ''VideoGame/HellgateLondon''.
** In ''VideoGame/{{Mabinogi}}'', gold only stacks up to 1,000 per square. However, there are items called Gold Bags which occupy four squares each, and can hold up to 50,000 gold each. Also, your bank account can hold up to six million gold per character, and any of the characters can access it (useful for kitting out a new character with no money of their own).

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** * The first ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' game (although ammo was mysteriously stored elsewhere), the second switched to a list inventory. A bug in the first game allows one to exploit a glitch and stack inventory items on top of each other.
*** * ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution'' brings back the grid inventory, and even allows you to upgrade inventory space, but now makes ammo take up space. The game will automatically reposition items for the best fit, though.
* The ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' series. series:
**
The first also had the rather painful restriction that ''gold'' (in stacks of up to 5,000, though double this with the right and otherwise useless amulet in the unofficial expansion pack) took up precious inventory space. Few items were actually worth more than their gold worth, which made them that much more precious.
** And its {{Spiritual Successor}}s ''Mythos'' and ''VideoGame/HellgateLondon''.
** In ''VideoGame/{{Mabinogi}}'', gold only stacks up to 1,000 per square. However, there are items called Gold Bags which occupy four squares each, and can hold up to 50,000 gold each. Also, your bank account can hold up to six million gold per character, and any of the characters can access it (useful for kitting out a new character with no money of their own).
precious.



* And its {{Spiritual Successor}}s ''Mythos'' and ''VideoGame/HellgateLondon''.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Mabinogi}}'', gold only stacks up to 1,000 per square. However, there are items called Gold Bags which occupy four squares each, and can hold up to 50,000 gold each. Also, your bank account can hold up to six million gold per character, and any of the characters can access it (useful for kitting out a new character with no money of their own).



* ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' included a version of this trope. Not only did it include it for just about every item you could acquire (including the special final-boss-ass-kicking-gun), but you were able to purchase new cases of increased size. Now, how a rocket launcher takes up as much space as a few handguns is a WHOLE other issue...
** It at least granted the player the mercy of being able to rotate items. A 1x2 item could fit in a 2x1 slot with a single rotation, whereas other games (notoriously, ''Diablo'' and its successors, as mentioned above) provided no such option.
** Another great thing about the ''Resident Evil 4'' inventory grid is that while organizing one's inventory, a separate grid would appear to the side for you to temporarily store tiny items while you rearranged the more cumbersome ones, instead of forcing you to move everything around with what little free space was available.
** By the end of the game, it was trivially easy to store a handgun, a shotgun, a rifle, a submachine gun, a rocket launcher, a mine thrower, ''and'' a revolver. It almost qualifies as HammerSpace. That's one ''hell'' of an attache case.
** ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' has an irritating variation on this which was one of [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee's]] complaints about the game. All items were shrunk to a single grid square (unrealistic, but good), but you only had 9 squares (unrealistic and BAD). Basically, it didn't matter what items you were carrying; you could only carry nine items...or types of items: some objects stack together into one inventory space while others don't, so in ''Resident Evil 5'', 81 incendiary grenades take up as much room as 9 smallish herbs.
*** Worst of all? There are two vests that provide you with more health (melee and bulletproof), each of them taking up a space.
*** Although there's a positive trait for it: one can exploit the inventory for speed reloading, you'll need it for weapons with slow reloading speed, such as Hydra shotgun and Smith & Wesson M500 magnum revolver.

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* The ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'' series has a grid inventory in most games, although in the earlier games there's at most one or two items that take up more than a single space, usually the most powerful weapons, like rocket launchers.
**
''VideoGame/ResidentEvil4'' included a version of this trope. Not only did it include it for just about every item you could acquire (including the special final-boss-ass-kicking-gun), but you were able to purchase new cases of increased size. Now, how a rocket launcher takes up as much space as a few handguns is a WHOLE other issue...
**
issue... It at least granted the player the mercy of being able to rotate items. A 1x2 item could fit in a 2x1 slot with a single rotation, whereas other games (notoriously, ''Diablo'' and its successors, as mentioned above) provided no such option.
**
option. Another great thing about the ''Resident Evil 4'' inventory grid is that while organizing one's inventory, a separate grid would appear to the side for you to temporarily store tiny items while you rearranged the more cumbersome ones, instead of forcing you to move everything around with what little free space was available.
**
available. By the end of the game, it was trivially easy to store a handgun, a shotgun, a rifle, a submachine gun, a rocket launcher, a mine thrower, ''and'' a revolver. It almost qualifies as HammerSpace. That's one ''hell'' of an attache case.
** ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'' has an irritating a variation on this which was one of [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee's]] complaints about the game. All where all items were shrunk to a single grid square (unrealistic, but good), square, but you only had 9 squares (unrealistic and BAD). squares. Basically, it didn't matter what items you were carrying; you could only carry nine items...or types of items: some objects stack together into one inventory space while others don't, so in ''Resident Evil 5'', 81 incendiary grenades take up as much room as 9 smallish herbs.
*** Worst of all? There are two vests that provide you with more health (melee and bulletproof), each of them taking up a space.
*** Although there's a positive trait for it: one can exploit the inventory for speed reloading, you'll need it for weapons with slow reloading speed, such as Hydra shotgun and Smith & Wesson M500 magnum revolver.
herbs.



* ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'' does this with both weight and space, but you never really seem to run out - until you have to haul buttloads of treasure back. That's why God invented party members. Also, it features a defragment button which neatly tidies your inventory.
** There's also something of a cheat: in order to assign an object to a hotkey, you need to place it in one of the ten slots at the bottom of the screen, thus removing it from the grid. These slots ignore the dimensions of the item, and you can assign any item to them, which means that you can save a lot of space by assigning armor and weapons to them.
* The ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' and ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'' series have both a grid system ''and'' a weight system, although in ''NWN 2'' you almost never run out of grid space. They don't have a size limit, though, so, as long as you can carry items to the weight of ten full-plate suits of armour, you can carry ten full-plate suits of armour, even though any one of these is almost as big as you. And ''NWN 2'' does have a defragmenting button (?Arrange Inventory?). Ha!
** The key difference between both games is that ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' takes different sizes into account: An armor set requires much more space then a potion although you are still given enough grid space to carry around several sets of full plate armor. In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'', every single item takes up exactly on space on the grid and containers such as bags can hold an absurd amount of items, rendering the GridInventory fairly pointless.
* The ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}'' games made heavy use of this, even giving the characters separate grids for each body location (and separate Time Unit costs to move things from place to place).
** Most slots were never used. A gun in hand, ammo and grenades on the belt, and ''maybe'' an additional gun and ammo in the backpack. That still left shoulder and leg spots available, but, considering the fact that there was nothing useful to put there, ''and'' the fact that the weight of equipment is an important factor in how far your soldiers can move, they were almost always left blank.
*** However, it's marginally faster to move grenades (and high explosive) to the hands from the shoulders, rather than the default belt slot.
*** The [[VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown 2012 remake]] does away with inventory entirely, letting you choose a main weapon, backup weapon, armor and supplementary equipment. However, they do give a shout-out to the original game, as changing your weapon from bullet to laser to plasma will change the soldier's shoulder pads and knee pads to accommodate the ammunition of the weapon.
*** SpiritualSuccessor series ''UFO'' does much the same thing. Starting with the second game ''Aftershock'', certain units had larger or smaller inventory grids (humans had the largest, with cyborgs slightly smaller and psychics the smallest). In the third game, ''Afterlight'', the type of environmental suit worn by the soldier determines the carrying capacity, with more protective armors resulting in smaller inventory grids (usually).

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* ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'' does this with both weight and space, but you never really seem to run out - until you have to haul buttloads of treasure back. That's why God invented party members. Also, it features a defragment button which neatly tidies your inventory.
**
inventory. There's also something of a cheat: in order to assign an object to a hotkey, you need to place it in one of the ten slots at the bottom of the screen, thus removing it from the grid. These slots ignore the dimensions of the item, and you can assign any item to them, which means that you can save a lot of space by assigning armor and weapons to them.
* The ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' and ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'' series have both a grid system ''and'' a weight system, although in ''NWN 2'' you almost never run out of grid space. They don't have a size limit, though, so, so as long as you can carry items to the weight of ten full-plate suits of armour, you can carry ten full-plate suits of armour, even though any one of these is almost as big as you. And ''NWN 2'' does have a defragmenting button (?Arrange Inventory?). Ha!
**
The key difference between both games is that ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'' takes different sizes into account: An armor set requires much more space then a potion although you are still given enough grid space to carry around several sets of full plate armor. In ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights2'', every single item takes up exactly on one space on the grid and containers such as bags can hold an absurd amount of items, rendering the GridInventory fairly pointless.
* The ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}'' games made heavy use of this, even giving the characters separate grids for each body location (and separate Time Unit costs to move things from place to place). \n** Most slots were never used. A gun in hand, ammo and grenades on the belt, and ''maybe'' an additional gun and ammo in the backpack. That still left shoulder and leg spots available, but, considering the fact that there was nothing useful to put there, ''and'' the fact that the weight of equipment is an important factor in how far your soldiers can move, they were almost always left blank.
***
blank. However, it's marginally faster to move grenades (and high explosive) to the hands from the shoulders, rather than the default belt slot.
*** ** The [[VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown 2012 remake]] does away with inventory entirely, letting you choose a main weapon, backup weapon, armor and supplementary equipment. However, they do give a shout-out to the original game, as changing your weapon from bullet to laser to plasma will change the soldier's shoulder pads and knee pads to accommodate the ammunition of the weapon.
*** * SpiritualSuccessor series ''UFO'' does much the same thing.thing as ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}''. Starting with the second game ''Aftershock'', certain units had larger or smaller inventory grids (humans had the largest, with cyborgs slightly smaller and psychics the smallest). In the third game, ''Afterlight'', the type of environmental suit worn by the soldier determines the carrying capacity, with more protective armors resulting in smaller inventory grids (usually).



* Many games fail to account for different sized objects properly. In ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', six sheets of paper take up as much space as a breastplate. ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is even worse, since all items take up the same amount of space, a character with maximum strength could carry sixteen suits of full plate, but they still couldn't hold more than sixteen pearls (unless you get a jewel bag, ''good luck finding one''.)
** Most mods, particularly mods developed by one of the ''game designers'' fix this by allowing identical items to be stacked. Additional mods (of even the same ones) can allow items to be stacked infinitely, making the game ''much'' less annoying for inventory management.

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* Many games fail to account for different sized objects properly. In ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', six sheets of paper take up as much space as a breastplate. ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' is even worse, since all items take up the same amount of space, so a character with maximum strength could carry sixteen suits of full plate, but they still couldn't hold more than sixteen pearls (unless you get a jewel bag, ''good luck finding one''.)
**
bag). Most mods, particularly mods developed by one of the ''game designers'' fix this by allowing identical items to be stacked. Additional mods (of even the same ones) can allow items to be stacked infinitely, making the game ''much'' less annoying for inventory management.



* The furniture in the ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' series turns into leaves for easy transportation when picked up, so every item from a tissue box to a UFO will fit equally in your inventory. Furniture can also fall out of shaken trees as leaves and fall down slowly just as a leaf would no matter what it is.
** Possibly justified by the fact that the furniture is from a {{tanuki}}, a creature that, in Japanese mythology, can create illusions with leaves, and, in some variations, magically transform the leaves into real objects. In other words, [[AWizardDidIt a tanuki did it]].

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* The furniture in the ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' series turns into leaves for easy transportation when picked up, so every item from a tissue box to a UFO will fit equally in your inventory. Furniture can also fall out of shaken trees as leaves and fall down slowly just as a leaf would no matter what it is.
**
is. Possibly justified by the fact that the furniture is from a {{tanuki}}, a creature that, in Japanese mythology, can create illusions with leaves, and, in some variations, magically transform the leaves into real objects. In other words, [[AWizardDidIt a tanuki did it]].



* ''VideoGame/DeadSpace'' and ''VideoGame/DeadSpace2'' have a simple system of inventory with most things taking up on square but ammo and stasis refills stack. Weapons have their only separate section, as do plot items. Getting better suits increases you storage space.
** Though in ''VideoGame/DeadSpace2'' weapons go int the same inventory as the rest of the items, and only take up one space like everything else.

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* ''VideoGame/DeadSpace'' and ''VideoGame/DeadSpace2'' have a simple system of inventory with most things taking up on square but ammo and stasis refills stack. Weapons have their only separate section, as do plot items. Getting better suits increases you storage space.
**
space. Though in ''VideoGame/DeadSpace2'' weapons go int the same inventory as the rest of the items, and only take up one space like everything else.



* ''7.62 High Caliber'' uses a grid inventory, but divides it between various carrying methods. All characters have 8 inventory slots (divided into two four-slot pockets) on their clothing no matter what uniform they wear, while various backpacks, tactical vests, and belts provide slots of different size and configuration; all carrying equipment uses bold lines to divide inventory slots and represent smaller spaces, so a particular backpack may eschew a large central space for more small pockets suitable for holding a single rifle magazine or grenade. Only the character's main pockets, tactical vest, and belt can have their items accessed without going into the inventory screen; an important part of preparing for combat is loading your ready pockets with magazines, first aid kits, spare ammo boxes, grenades, and other important items so you don't have to go scrounging through your backpack. It also subverts the usual caveat that weight doesn't matter, and even includes gradual slowdown over a certain load.
** The one downside to the method in terms of realism is that items cannot be rotated; a pouch with two horizontal slots will fit a first aid kit or cleaning kit perfectly (as it's a horizontal item that takes up two slots), but a vertical two-slot pouch can't fit it at all. The very popular Blue Sun mod was unable to code rotation into the inventory, so they tried to compensate by making copies of a handful of items (like first aid kits and cleaning kits) that were vertical rather than horizontal. It ends up creating an even odder situation where you may have a choice of only horizontal cleaning kits and no horizontal slots to fit them!

to:

* ''7.62 High Caliber'' uses a grid inventory, but divides it between various carrying methods. All characters have 8 inventory slots (divided into two four-slot pockets) on their clothing no matter what uniform they wear, while various backpacks, tactical vests, and belts provide slots of different size and configuration; all carrying equipment uses bold lines to divide inventory slots and represent smaller spaces, so a particular backpack may eschew a large central space for more small pockets suitable for holding a single rifle magazine or grenade. Only the character's main pockets, tactical vest, and belt can have their items accessed without going into the inventory screen; an important part of preparing for combat is loading your ready pockets with magazines, first aid kits, spare ammo boxes, grenades, and other important items so you don't have to go scrounging through your backpack. It also subverts the usual caveat that weight doesn't matter, and even includes gradual slowdown over a certain load.
**
load.\\
\\
The one downside to the method in terms of realism is that items cannot be rotated; a pouch with two horizontal slots will fit a first aid kit or cleaning kit perfectly (as it's a horizontal item that takes up two slots), but a vertical two-slot pouch can't fit it at all. The very popular Blue Sun mod was unable to code rotation into the inventory, so they tried to compensate by making copies of a handful of items (like first aid kits and cleaning kits) that were vertical rather than horizontal. It ends up creating an even odder situation where you may have a choice of only horizontal cleaning kits and no horizontal slots to fit them!
22nd Oct '16 7:31:07 PM Willbyr
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[[quoteright:256:[[VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/DS_KingdomHearts358_01_4424.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:256:[[VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2 %% Image selected per Image Pickin' thread: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/posts.php?discussion=1472895005018065900
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution
http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/DS_KingdomHearts358_01_4424.jpg]]]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/rsz_deus_ex_human_revolution_inventory.png]]]]


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9th Aug '16 7:52:09 PM Ripburger
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* The ''{{X-COM}}'' games made heavy use of this, even giving the characters separate grids for each body location (and separate Time Unit costs to move things from place to place).

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* The ''{{X-COM}}'' ''{{VideoGame/XCOM}}'' games made heavy use of this, even giving the characters separate grids for each body location (and separate Time Unit costs to move things from place to place).



*** The 2012 remake does away with inventory entirely, letting you choose a main weapon, backup weapon, armor and supplementary equipment. However, they do give a shout-out to the original game, as changing your weapon from bullet to laser to plasma will change the soldier's shoulder pads and knee pads to accommodate the ammunition of the weapon.

to:

*** The [[VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown 2012 remake remake]] does away with inventory entirely, letting you choose a main weapon, backup weapon, armor and supplementary equipment. However, they do give a shout-out to the original game, as changing your weapon from bullet to laser to plasma will change the soldier's shoulder pads and knee pads to accommodate the ammunition of the weapon.
2nd Aug '16 3:51:20 AM Morgenthaler
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** Although the strategy game ''MechCommander'' only had weight restrictions for adding weapons and components, the sequel played this completely straight- each 'Mech had a grid inventory the represented both size and weight of the weapons added, as well as extra armour and heatsinks (the other limit on components) This system was used somewhat creatively, however, since smaller 'Mechs could have a lot of space but the grid would be made tall and narrow, preventing the addition of heavy weapons.

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** Although the strategy game ''MechCommander'' ''VideoGame/MechCommander'' only had weight restrictions for adding weapons and components, the sequel played this completely straight- each 'Mech had a grid inventory the represented both size and weight of the weapons added, as well as extra armour and heatsinks (the other limit on components) This system was used somewhat creatively, however, since smaller 'Mechs could have a lot of space but the grid would be made tall and narrow, preventing the addition of heavy weapons.
6th Apr '16 5:30:15 AM Adept
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* The CarWars like boardgame ''Battlecars'' used this. Each car had several weapon bays, usually 2x4 squares. You could carry 8 volleys of machinegun ammo (1x1), four 1x2 artillery shells, or two 1x4 missiles, of increasing power, mixing and matching as you wish.

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* The CarWars TabletopGame/CarWars like boardgame ''Battlecars'' used this. Each car had several weapon bays, usually 2x4 squares. You could carry 8 volleys of machinegun ammo (1x1), four 1x2 artillery shells, or two 1x4 missiles, of increasing power, mixing and matching as you wish.
28th Mar '16 7:00:26 PM Winter
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* Each playable spaceship in ''VideoGame/InfiniteSpace'' has a unique (and frequently oddly shaped) grid for equipping modules that improve accuracy, durability, etc. Engine and bridge modules are mandatory and must be placed in designated squares. Carriers cannot launch fighters unless hangers are installed adjacent to the catapult(s).
* Playable tanks in ''Videogame/ValkyriaChronicles'' have a grid for equipping optional parts, such as extra ammo storage or tread defense. Later games in the series do away with this in favour of a system more akin to traditional RPG equipment slots where only one of each type of upgrade can be equipped, and equipment must be within the chassis' weight limit.
16th Mar '16 7:56:24 PM Dallenson
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** ''[=MechWarrior=] 4: Vengeance'', ''Black Knight'' and ''Mercenaries'' featured a more reasonable system in which each 'mech had specific hardpoints for weapons to be mounted and a limited number of slots on those points along with weight restrictions, some 'mechs had gray omni-points denoting any weapon could be mounted. The [=MekTek=] pack introduced 'mechs with ammo consuming (ballistic and/or energy), heat generating (energy and/or missiles) and direct fire (energy and/or ballistic) points.

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** ''[=MechWarrior=] 4: Vengeance'', ''Black Knight'' and ''Mercenaries'' featured a more reasonable system in which each 'mech had specific hardpoints for weapons to be mounted and a limited number of slots on those points along with weight restrictions, some 'mechs had gray omni-points denoting any weapon could be mounted. The [=MekTek=] pack introduced 'mechs with ammo consuming (ballistic and/or energy), missiles), heat generating (energy and/or missiles) and direct fire (energy and/or ballistic) points.
20th Feb '16 2:07:28 PM Dallenson
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** ''[=MechWarrior=] 3'' and ''Pirate's Moon'' all had the same limitations in each section of a 'mech despite the size and there were no hardpoint limitations meaning that the arms of the Annihilator intended to [[{{Whoring}} boat]] ballistic weapons could fire missiles or the missile point of the Thor/Summoner (treated as the Left Torso) could fire large lasers.
** ''[=MechWarrior=] 4: Vengeance'', ''Black Knight'' and ''Mercenaries'' featured a more reasonable system in which each 'mech had specific hardpoints for weapons to be mounted and a limited number of slots on those points along with weight restrictions, some 'mechs had gray omni-points denoting any weapon could be mounted. The [=MekTek=] pack introduced 'mechs with ammo consuming (ballistic and/or energy), heat generating (energy and/or missiles) and direct fire (energy and/or ballistic) points.
** ''[=MechWarrior=]: Online'' used the limited space per section of the third game along with hardpoint restrictions of the fourth and introduced a limit of how many of each weapon could be mounted in that section. For example, each arm of the Jagermech only holds two ballistic weapons which can either be taken up by two autocannons to take up all of the slots available or by two machine guns and no more ballistic weapons could be mounted despite the remaining space.
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