History Main / GratuitousSpanish

13th Jun '18 5:55:47 AM VicGeorge2011
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* "La Cancion De Guerra" by Music/CultureClub is simply "The War Song" with part of its lyrics sung in Spanish.
26th May '18 11:38:50 AM Pichu-kun
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* Puss in Boots in the ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' films, by virtue of being voiced by Antonio Banderas. The Mexican dub replaces it with Antonio Banderas speaking with a heavy Andalusian accent. In the Spanish dub, Banderas exaggerates his own Malagueño accentc

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* Set in 19th century Spain, the 1923 film ''Film/{{Rosita}}'' has Spanish sprinkled about, such as Rosita saying "caramba" and the occasional "senora".
* Puss in Boots in the ''WesternAnimation/{{Shrek}}'' films, by virtue of being voiced by Antonio Banderas. The Mexican dub replaces it with Antonio Banderas speaking with a heavy Andalusian accent. In the Spanish dub, Banderas exaggerates his own Malagueño accentcaccent.
16th May '18 5:18:57 AM nightfurywitch
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* WebAnimation/EddsWorld has Eduardo, who not only has an AmbiguousAccent , but is also very closely tied with the phrase “Numero Uno”

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* WebAnimation/EddsWorld has Eduardo, who not only has an AmbiguousAccent is NonSpecificallyForeign , but is also very closely tied with the phrase “Numero Uno”
16th May '18 5:16:23 AM nightfurywitch
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* WebAnimation/EddsWorld has Eduardo, who not only has an AmbiguousAccent , but is also very closely tied with the phrase “Numero Uno”
1st May '18 5:15:02 AM Naram-Sin
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* ''Series/BreakingBad'': Gus Fring's fried chicken deli is called ''Los Pollos Hermanos'' ("The Chicken Brothers").
1st May '18 4:54:20 AM Naram-Sin
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** And of course, every state which was first colonized by the Spanish Empire has plenty of cities which retain names in their language, including the top six cities in California (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, and Sacramento), and three of Texas' top nine (San Antonio, El Paso and Plano). Three states have names derived from Spanish words: Nevada ("snowy," from the Sierra Nevada, which being high mountains are actually snow-capped), Florida ("full of flowers"[[note]]though it changed the Spanish accent - Flo-ree-da - to the previous syllable - Floh-rida[[/note]]), and Montana (from ''montaña'', meaning "mountain", because there are lots of mountains there). Montana also has a Spanish motto: ''Oro y plata'' ("Gold and silver").
* Arbusto Energy, a petroleum and energy company formed in Midland, Texas, in 1979, for former US President George W. Bush. Arbusto means "bush" in Spanish.

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** And of course, every * Every American state which was first colonized by the Spanish Empire has plenty of cities which retain names in their language, including the top six cities in California (Los Angeles, San Diego, San Jose, San Francisco, Fresno, and Sacramento), and three of Texas' top nine (San Antonio, El Paso and Plano). Three states have names derived from Spanish words: Nevada ("snowy," from the Sierra Nevada, which being high mountains are actually snow-capped), Florida ("full of flowers"[[note]]though it changed the Spanish accent - Flo-ree-da - to the previous syllable - Floh-rida[[/note]]), and Montana (from ''montaña'', meaning "mountain", because there are lots of mountains there). Montana also has a Spanish motto: ''Oro y plata'' ("Gold and silver").
** This goes double for California, where many areas that were not settled until after the American takeover still got Spanish names - and just as often, pseudo-Spanish names - for exotic flavor or to appear OlderThanTheyThink. Some examples that come across as ridiculous to Spanish ears include Contra Costa County ("Counter-Coast" County, even thought it's inland except for a small part) and Chula Vista - which is supposedly "Beautiful View", but a Spanish speaker may actually translate as "Cocky Female Seen".
* Arbusto Energy, a petroleum and energy company formed in Midland, Texas, in 1979, for by former US President George W. Bush. Arbusto means "bush" in Spanish.



* Chavacano, another language spoken in the Philippines. It's not even a Spanish creole, it basically '''is'''' Spanish.

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* Chavacano, another language spoken in the Philippines. It's not even a Spanish creole, it basically '''is'''' '''is''' Spanish.
28th Apr '18 5:34:03 PM TangyMango
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[[DescribeTopicHere Describe el español gratuito aquí.]][[note]]Describe Gratuitous Spanish here.[[/note]]
22nd Apr '18 11:02:59 PM blueberry52
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** Filipinos also have the habit of speaking either English or Spanish when it comes to numbers (with the later usually used for numbers 1-100 and time).
19th Apr '18 12:40:13 PM bowserbros
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[[note]]Since there is a great TV production in California, and California has a border with Mexico (Baja California, to be specific), it is only natural that U.S. TV writers would insert Spanish words and phrases into their series to make things seem more [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign foreign]]. This trend has recently become popular in Japan, though it has a way to go before it becomes as popular as German or English. But since more and more people in the US speak Spanish (and Spanish-speakers are increasingly present in all professions and classes, including entertainment), Spanish is becoming more and more common both in fiction and real life.[[/note]]

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[[note]]Since there a good amount of TV is a great TV production produced in California, and California has specifically southern California, which shares a border with Mexico (Baja California, to be specific), Mexico, it is only natural that U.S. American TV writers would insert Spanish words and phrases into their series to make things seem more [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign foreign]]. This trend has recently become popular in Japan, Japan recently, though it has a way ways to go before it becomes as popular as German or English. But since more and more people in the US speak Spanish (and Spanish-speakers are increasingly present in all professions and classes, including entertainment), Spanish is becoming more and more common in both in fiction and real life.[[/note]]
14th Apr '18 3:45:39 PM lakingsif
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[[note]]Since there is a great TV production in California, and California has a frontier with Mexico (Baja California, to be specific), it is only natural that U.S. TV writers would insert Spanish words and phrases into their series to make things seem más [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign foreign]]. This trend has recently become popular in Japan, though it has a way to go before it becomes as popular as German or English. But since more and more people in the US speak Spanish (and Spanish-speakers are increasingly present in all professions and classes, including entertainment), Spanish is becoming more and more common both in fiction and real life.[[/note]]

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[[note]]Since there is a great TV production in California, and California has a frontier border with Mexico (Baja California, to be specific), it is only natural that U.S. TV writers would insert Spanish words and phrases into their series to make things seem más more [[AsLongAsItSoundsForeign foreign]]. This trend has recently become popular in Japan, though it has a way to go before it becomes as popular as German or English. But since more and more people in the US speak Spanish (and Spanish-speakers are increasingly present in all professions and classes, including entertainment), Spanish is becoming more and more common both in fiction and real life.[[/note]]
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