History Main / GratuitousItalian

17th Jul '16 12:56:41 AM TomWalpertac2
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For gratuitous examples of other languages, see also: GratuitousSpanish, GratuitousFrench, GratuitousGerman, GratuitousEnglish, GratuitousJapanese, GratuitousRussian, etc.

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For gratuitous examples This is a subtrope of other languages, see also: GratuitousSpanish, GratuitousFrench, GratuitousGerman, GratuitousEnglish, GratuitousJapanese, GratuitousRussian, etc.GratuitousForeignLanguage and really should be used with extreme care.
17th Jul '16 12:40:15 AM TomWalpertac2
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Added DiffLines:


For gratuitous examples of other languages, see also: GratuitousSpanish, GratuitousFrench, GratuitousGerman, GratuitousEnglish, GratuitousJapanese, GratuitousRussian, etc.
30th May '16 7:42:55 PM PolarManne
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Added DiffLines:

* The 21st installment of the [[{{VideoGame/Beatmania}} beatmania IIDX]] series is subtitled SPADA, which means "sword". [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Guess what its theme revolves around.]] It also introduces new HarderThanHard versions of songs that are subtitled "†LEGGENDARIA", which means "legendary" (it's shortened to just † in the following game).
** There's also the song LA FESTA LA VITA!!, which literally means "THE FESTIVAL THE LIFE!!".
25th May '16 7:20:40 PM Willbyr
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* Parco Folgore in ''GashBell''.

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* Parco Folgore in ''GashBell''.''Manga/ZatchBell''.
18th May '16 12:57:10 PM Berrenta
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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'' is a parody of ''ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' and features opera prominently, so naturally it has grammatically incorrect GratuitousItalian. A scene in the opera has a young woman singing about how hard it is for her to leave her lover: ''"Questa maledetta porta si blocca, si blocca comunque diavolo io faccio...!"''. Then, the aria is translated into English:

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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novel ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'' is a parody of ''ThePhantomOfTheOpera'' and features opera prominently, so naturally it has grammatically incorrect GratuitousItalian.Gratuitous Italian. A scene in the opera has a young woman singing about how hard it is for her to leave her lover: ''"Questa maledetta porta si blocca, si blocca comunque diavolo io faccio...!"''. Then, the aria is translated into English:



* And then of course there are [[SuperMarioBros Mario]] and his brother [[EnsembleDarkhorse Luigi]]. Hilariously so in the ''Mario & Luigi'' games where, when talking to non-speaking [=NPCs=], they speak Italian-sounding gibberish.
** Luigi tends to use more GratuitousItalian than his brother, predominantly words like Ciao! and Grazie! in the likes of ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'', etc.

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* And then of course there are [[SuperMarioBros [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario]] and his brother [[EnsembleDarkhorse Luigi]]. Hilariously so in the ''Mario & Luigi'' games where, when talking to non-speaking [=NPCs=], they speak Italian-sounding gibberish.
**
gibberish. Luigi tends to use more GratuitousItalian Gratuitous Italian than his brother, predominantly words like Ciao! and Grazie! in the likes of ''VideoGame/LuigisMansionDarkMoon'', etc.



* GratuitousFrench is usually switched with GratuitousItalian in French dubs.

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* GratuitousFrench is usually switched with GratuitousItalian Gratuitous Italian in French dubs.
7th May '16 3:24:55 PM nombretomado
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* Sofia from ''TheGoldenGirls'' constantly spouted off gratuitous Italian (or Sicilian) phrases, especially when riled or passing on a proverb.

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* Sofia from ''TheGoldenGirls'' ''Series/TheGoldenGirls'' constantly spouted off gratuitous Italian (or Sicilian) phrases, especially when riled or passing on a proverb.



* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', one of the Tenth Doctor's many catchphrases is: "molto bene!".
** Which means "very good!"

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* In ''Series/DoctorWho'', one of the Tenth Doctor's many catchphrases is: "molto bene!".
** Which
bene!", which means "very good!"
12th Apr '16 1:56:39 PM Prfnoff
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* The very title of ''Roleplay/FateNuovoGuerra'', a ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' PlayByPostGame set in Italy. Again, it is incorrect because of the issue with gendered adjectives; the correct spelling should be either "Fate una Nuova Guerra" or "Fate di Nuovo Guerra". (Even more confusingly, "fate" in Italian means "fairies.")

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* The very title of ''Roleplay/FateNuovoGuerra'', a ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' PlayByPostGame set in Italy. Again, it is incorrect because of the issue with gendered adjectives; the correct spelling should be either "Fate una Nuova Guerra" or "Fate di Nuovo Guerra". (Even more confusingly, "fate" in Italian Italian, [[ItIsPronouncedTroPAY pronounced "fa-tay,"]] means "fairies.")
12th Apr '16 1:56:02 PM Prfnoff
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* The very title of ''Roleplay/FateNuovoGuerra'', a ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' PlayByPostGame set in Italy.
** Again, it is incorrect because of the issue with gendered adjectives.
** Actually, the correct spelling should be either "Fate una Nuova Guerra" or "Fate di Nuovo Guerra".

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* The very title of ''Roleplay/FateNuovoGuerra'', a ''VisualNovel/FateStayNight'' PlayByPostGame set in Italy.
**
Italy. Again, it is incorrect because of the issue with gendered adjectives.
** Actually,
adjectives; the correct spelling should be either "Fate una Nuova Guerra" or "Fate di Nuovo Guerra".Guerra". (Even more confusingly, "fate" in Italian means "fairies.")
12th Apr '16 1:49:52 PM Prfnoff
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->'''Mr. Parker:''' 'Fra-gi-le'... it must be Italian!
->'''Mrs. Parker:''' I think that says 'fragile', honey.

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->'''Mr. Parker:''' 'Fra-gi-le'... it must be Italian!
->'''Mrs.
Italian!\\
'''Mrs.
Parker:''' I think that says 'fragile', honey.



* Classical music terminology runs on this trope as well as GratuitousGerman, but specifically, Italian tends to be the universal language for sheet music markings, including the tempo (itself an Italian loan-word), dynamics, and various technique markings. Which means musicians across the world know at least a few words in Italian, like ''forte'' (loud) and ''presto'' (very fast).

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* Classical music terminology runs on this trope as well as GratuitousGerman, but specifically, Italian tends to be the universal language for sheet music markings, including the tempo (itself an Italian loan-word), dynamics, and various technique markings. Which means Since musicians across the world have come to know at least a few words in Italian, like ''forte'' (loud) and ''presto'' (very fast).fast), composers have freely mixed common Italian terminology with performance directions in their own languages, e.g. "Più mosso (doch nicht alla breve)" in Music/GustavMahler's third symphony.
11th Apr '16 11:42:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* Otto goes into this in ''AFishCalledWanda'', largely because it's a turn-on for Wanda.
* Pistachio and and his grandfather speak this after Pistachio says something to Jennifer about her bottom while finding an assistant in "TheMasterofDisguise," and it also happens in the beginning of the movie when Pistachio says, "Fantastico."

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* Otto goes into this in ''AFishCalledWanda'', ''Film/AFishCalledWanda'', largely because it's a turn-on for Wanda.
* Pistachio and and his grandfather speak this after Pistachio says something to Jennifer about her bottom while finding an assistant in "TheMasterofDisguise," "Film/TheMasterofDisguise," and it also happens in the beginning of the movie when Pistachio says, "Fantastico."
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GratuitousItalian