History Main / GratuitousGerman

27th Apr '18 3:40:39 PM KawaiiKoolness
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''DarthWiki/TheGingerverse'': Dana von Franke and her brother Konrad (mainly Dana) speak like this. When Ava Vegard bullies her or her bother, Dana usually calls her a dummkopf. Other examples of times she speaks like this: she says "Ja' instead of "yes", she says "Guten tag" when everyone else says hello, and she says "nein" instead of "no".

to:

* ''DarthWiki/TheGingerverse'': Dana von Franke and her brother Konrad (mainly Dana) speak like this. When Ava Vegard bullies her or her bother, Dana usually calls her a dummkopf. Other examples of times she speaks like this: she says "Ja' instead of "yes", she says "Guten tag" when everyone else says hello, and she says "nein" instead of "no". Also, in the second version Dana's song, Vibrant Tulips, there is German being sung in the background, specifically: Guten tag, auf wiedersehn.
23rd Apr '18 12:59:24 AM SSJKamui
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Martin Heidegger is one noteable case here.

to:

** Martin Heidegger is one noteable case here. This is because most of his terms are extremely difficult to translate.
23rd Apr '18 12:56:55 AM SSJKamui
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In mathematics and computeability, we have the term "Entscheidungsproblem", literally translating into "Problem of making a decision". The Entscheidungsproblem refers to the question if a mathematical task is computeable. Most famous use of the word is the article "On Computeable Numbers, with an application to the Entscheidungsproblem", by Alan Turing, which defined the famous Turing Machine.


Added DiffLines:

** Martin Heidegger is one noteable case here.


Added DiffLines:

** The Most famous german restaurant in tokio is called "Die Wurst", meaning "The saucage".
23rd Apr '18 12:52:01 AM SSJKamui
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement.

to:

* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. (This is one reason, why the word "Angst", literally meaning Fear or Anxiety, entered the english language. ) Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement. Dugin also adores the german culture til the 1960s (but he thinks, afterwards, globalism and americanism have destroyed the original german culture.) and one of the main pillars of his eurasian empire would be a close alliance between germany and russia.
23rd Apr '18 12:48:02 AM SSJKamui
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement.



* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement.

to:

* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement.
23rd Apr '18 12:47:33 AM SSJKamui
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A notable habit of the russian philosopher Alexander Dugin. He sometimes puts into his speeches and books whole german sentences. (For example "Dasein heißt Mitsein" meaning "Existing means existing together with other humans" or "Dasein ist Voelkisch", roughly translated to "Existence is closely related to Cultures/Civilisations". He even calls his magnum opus the "political theory of Dasein".) One big reason for this is, that he frequently refers to Martin Heidegger, whose terms are notoriously difficult to translate into other languages. This is the reason why some other Heidegger scholars also used german words to describe his philosophy. Dugin also often uses german words, which are deemed politically incorrect in germany. Best example is the already mentioned word "Voelkisch", which has an extremely negative connotation because the Nazis called themselves the "voelkisch" movement.
22nd Apr '18 10:30:58 AM KawaiiKoolness
Is there an issue? Send a Message
10th Apr '18 11:31:12 AM KawaiiKoolness
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''DarthWiki/TheGingerverse'': Dana von Franke and her brother Konrad (mainly Dana) speak like this. When Ava Vegard bullies her or her bother, Dana usually calls her a dummkopf. Other examples of times she speaks like this: she says "Ja' instead of "yes", she says "Guten tag" when everyone else says hello, and she says "nein" instead of "no".
27th Feb '18 8:03:11 AM Piterpicher
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The original ''[[VideoGame/LegacyOfKain Blood Omen: Legacy of Kain]]'' (1996) by SiliconKnights has several German-sounding names for cities/villages (e.g. Vasserbünde, Coorhagen, Nachtholm, Steinchencröe, Uschtenheim - German speakers might know if they make sense or not), while the original script and voice acting of the game is in English.

to:

* The original ''[[VideoGame/LegacyOfKain Blood Omen: Legacy of Kain]]'' (1996) by SiliconKnights Creator/SiliconKnights has several German-sounding names for cities/villages (e.g. Vasserbünde, Coorhagen, Nachtholm, Steinchencröe, Uschtenheim - German speakers might know if they make sense or not), while the original script and voice acting of the game is in English.
26th Feb '18 2:38:58 AM Cryoclaste
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** And ''Anime/WeissKreuz'', apparently mostly because TakehitoKoyasu thinks German is cool. The series group takes its name from the broken German for White Cross -- the grammatically correct version would either be "Weisses Kreuz" or "Weißkreuz", the German name for lachrymatory gasses used in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. The other rival groups are Schwarz (Black) and Schreient (misspelled, means screaming).

to:

** And ''Anime/WeissKreuz'', apparently mostly because TakehitoKoyasu Creator/TakehitoKoyasu thinks German is cool. The series group takes its name from the broken German for White Cross -- the grammatically correct version would either be "Weisses Kreuz" or "Weißkreuz", the German name for lachrymatory gasses used in UsefulNotes/WorldWarI. The other rival groups are Schwarz (Black) and Schreient (misspelled, means screaming).
This list shows the last 10 events of 823. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GratuitousGerman