History Main / GratuitousGerman

1st Jul '17 3:34:41 PM nombretomado
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* The American fast food chain (Der)[[note]]The "Der" hasn't been officially used in the name since 1977, although some older restaurants still have their original signage.[[/note]] Wienerschnitzel. According to TheOtherWiki, one would normally use the neuter form "das" for "Wienerschnitzel". Additionally, a "Wiener Schnitzel" (which of course comes from Austria[[note]]Whose captial city is Vienna, or "Wien" in the original German, hence the name.[[/note]]) is a completely different food entirely from a hot dog (sometimes called a "wiener"[[note]]also spelled "weiner"[[/note]]), which the restaurant chain specializes in. In Germany, some sausages (similar to hot dogs) are called "Wiener Würstchen", hence the misunderstanding. And, by the way, the correct German name would be "Wiener Schnitzel" , not "Wienerschnitzel".

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* The American fast food chain (Der)[[note]]The "Der" hasn't been officially used in the name since 1977, although some older restaurants still have their original signage.[[/note]] Wienerschnitzel. According to TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, one would normally use the neuter form "das" for "Wienerschnitzel". Additionally, a "Wiener Schnitzel" (which of course comes from Austria[[note]]Whose captial city is Vienna, or "Wien" in the original German, hence the name.[[/note]]) is a completely different food entirely from a hot dog (sometimes called a "wiener"[[note]]also spelled "weiner"[[/note]]), which the restaurant chain specializes in. In Germany, some sausages (similar to hot dogs) are called "Wiener Würstchen", hence the misunderstanding. And, by the way, the correct German name would be "Wiener Schnitzel" , not "Wienerschnitzel".
29th Jun '17 9:23:48 AM wolftickets1969
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* The English version of Trio's lone international hit "Da Da Da" retains the German line "Ich liebe dich nicht, du liebst mich nicht"("I love you not, you love me not").

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* The English version of Trio's [[OneHitWonder lone international hit hit]] "Da Da Da" retains the German line "Ich liebe dich nicht, du liebst mich nicht"("I love you not, you love me not").
29th Jun '17 9:21:35 AM wolftickets1969
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* The English version of Trio's lone international hit "Da Da Da" retains the German line "Ich liebe dich nicht, du liebst mich nicht"("I love you not, you love me not").
29th Jun '17 9:15:42 AM wolftickets1969
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* French Canadian synthpop group Trans-X of "Living on Video" fame have "Ich Liebe Dich (I Love You)".
20th Jun '17 8:10:18 AM Piterpicher
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* Rudolf Von Flugel, from RichardScarry's childrens' stories, is prone to this sort of thing.

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* Rudolf Von Flugel, from RichardScarry's Creator/RichardScarry's childrens' stories, is prone to this sort of thing.
15th Jun '17 6:40:50 PM wolftickets1969
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Added DiffLines:

* UK {{trance}} supergroup duo The Argonauts' two singles were titled "Sommertag" and "Frühlingstag"; the latter sometimes [[TyopOnTheCover misspelled "Frühlingftag" or "Flühlingftag"]].
12th Jun '17 10:06:23 AM Hjortron18
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* DingoPictures, a German company that produced knockoffs of animated movies in the 90s, often has German words in the backgrounds of shots, examples being "Polizei" (police) and "Tierheim" (animal hospital). In some cases, they forget to dub over German words, an example being during their version of Pocahontas where the title character says "Nein!". In a number of cases they either leave German songs in the English dub or they dub the English directly over them. Wabuu's theme song as heard during Countryside Bears is an infamous example. In addition, many of the characters retain distinctly German names, such as Wuschel the squirrel. In at least one case they lampshaded this by explicitly setting "Mouse Police" in Germany.

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* DingoPictures, Creator/DingoPictures, a German company that produced knockoffs of animated movies in the 90s, often has German words in the backgrounds of shots, examples being "Polizei" (police) and "Tierheim" (animal hospital). In some cases, they forget to dub over German words, an example being during their version of Pocahontas where the title character says "Nein!". In a number of cases they either leave German songs in the English dub or they dub the English directly over them. Wabuu's theme song as heard during Countryside Bears ''Countryside Bears'' is an infamous example. In addition, many of the characters retain distinctly German names, such as Wuschel the squirrel. In at least one case they lampshaded this by explicitly setting "Mouse Police" ''Mouse Police'' in Germany.
31st May '17 8:19:55 PM Synchronicity
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* Prosecutor Gavin from the fourth ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' game.
** His name, Klavier, is the German word for piano. It was changed to Konrad (a proper German name) in the French localization, and became Kantilen in the German localization. Of course, the "Klavier Gavin" name originated in the English-language localization. In the original Japanese version, his name is Kyouya Garyuu. Klavier's name makes a bit more sense when you consider that he's a musician in a series that loves {{Punny Name}}s.
** His constant use of "Fraulein", however, is a little painful to native European German speakers, since "Fräulein" (with an Umlaut, you mind), being the diminutive of the title ''Frau'' and equivalent the title "Miss", is obsolete nowadays and only used when scolding or mocking someone. Calling a woman this can be considered being borderline sexist in some cases.
** His use of German in his sentences, as well as his name, are made funnier by the fact that he ''isn't even actually German.''

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* ''Franchise/AceAttorney'':
**
Prosecutor Klavier Gavin from the fourth ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' game.
**
game loves to sprinkle German words and phrases in his dialogue. His name, Klavier, is the German word for piano. It piano.[[note]]It was changed to Konrad (a proper German name) in the French localization, and became Kantilen in the German localization. Of course, the "Klavier Gavin" name originated in the English-language localization. In the original Japanese version, his name is Kyouya Garyuu. Klavier's name makes a bit more sense when you consider that he's a musician in a series that loves {{Punny Name}}s.
** His
Name}}s.[[/note]]His constant use of "Fraulein", however, is a little painful to native European German speakers, since "Fräulein" speakers. [[note]]"Fräulein" (with an Umlaut, you mind), being the diminutive of the title ''Frau'' and equivalent the title "Miss", is obsolete nowadays and only used when scolding or mocking someone. Calling a woman this can be considered being borderline sexist in some cases.
** His
cases.[[/note]] Note that other characters who grew up in Germany (such as Edgeworth and Franziska) do not do the same. Klavier's use of German in his sentences, as well as his name, are made funnier by the fact that he ''isn't even actually German.''German'', and at least some part of it is due to the rock star persona he actively cultivates.
--->'''Phoenix''': I like your affected Euro-rock accent, by the way.



** Come Dual Destinies, Athena Cykes likewise punctuates her dialogue with German at times. As well as GratuitousFrench and Spanish.

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** Come Dual Destinies, Athena Cykes Cykes, who spent the majority of her teen years in Europe, likewise punctuates her dialogue with German at times. As well as GratuitousFrench and Spanish.
7th May '17 6:32:20 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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** The trope is completely averted completely averted in ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder'' and its prequel ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheOldBlood'', where the use of German is as accurate as possible, and even the German dialects that appears, such as Bavarian, are spot on.

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** The trope is completely averted completely averted in ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheNewOrder'' and its prequel ''VideoGame/WolfensteinTheOldBlood'', where the use of German is [[ShownTheirWork as accurate as possible, possible]], and even the German dialects that appears, such as Bavarian, are pretty much spot on.
2nd May '17 2:06:07 PM Quanyails
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** While most of [[VideoGame/TalesOfRebirth Saleh]]'s moves are in English, his LimitBreak is the OddOneOut in that its called "Steif Brise", meaning "stiff breeze" in German. This was fixed in the english release of ''Tales of Link'' where Saleh was a boss in some higher level events. There, it was translated as..."Stiff Breeze", fittingly.

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** While most of [[VideoGame/TalesOfRebirth Saleh]]'s moves are in English, his LimitBreak is the OddOneOut OddNameOut in that its called "Steif Brise", meaning "stiff breeze" in German. This was fixed in the english English release of ''Tales of Link'' where Saleh was a boss in some higher level events. There, it was translated as..."Stiff Breeze", fittingly.
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