History Main / GratuitousFrench

17th Jan '18 7:07:43 PM karstovich2
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* For many of the same reasons that the British royals, French--especially Old French--is common in the legal profession in states adopting UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw. That reason being--the common law was first established under the Old French-speaking Normans and Angevins, particularly [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet Henry II Curtmantle]]. Thus for several centuries, the official language of the English courts was, oddly, French--specifically a formal register of the Norman dialects of Old and Middle French known as Norman Law French. Eventually, the law courts began to use English, but not before the English lawyers used when not before the courts was thoroughly peppered with Law French words and phrases. Like the [[AltumVidetur Latin phrases]] in the law, much of the French really is gratuitous (e.g. ''profit a pendre'', which means ''exactly the same thing'' as the perfectly serviceable--if equally inscrutable--English phrase "right of common"). On the other hand, some is semi-necessary, e.g. ''pur autre vie'': while it could be and sometimes is replaced with "for the term of another life," the French is a lot more concise. In a few cases, the French really is necessary, like the word ''parol'' in "parol evidence": although the term means "oral" or "spoken" in the original French, this rule of contract law banning the use of oral pre-contract understandings to contradict written contracts now also--if not primarily--applies to written pre-contract understandings, and couldn't be really expressed with another more "English" word.[[note]]If you're confused by this: (1) you're like most lawyers, including many contract lawyers and (2) consider this example: Alice wants to buy Bob's computer, as she needs a computer and Bob's computer has a really cool Batman sticker on it. She dashes off an e-mail to Bob asking if Bob is willing to sell her the computer along with the sticker, and Bob sends and email back saying he'd be happy to. Alice and Bob meet and draft a contract of sale on the computer, saying that they will exchange Bob's computer for Alice's money the following Friday; the contract makes no mention of the Batman sticker. That Friday comes along and Bob shows up with the computer, but has taken the sticker off. Alice might then sue Bob for breach of contract, because she believed that the Batman sticker was part of the deal; Bob will defend on the basis of the parol evidence rule (among other things--he might also have some defenses under the Uniform Commercial Code, as this is a sale of goods), because the emails were written before the contract and so are "parol evidence"--even though they are writings and not spoken, as implied by the original meaning of the word "parol(e)"--and therefore not part of the contract. What happens in the lawsuit is complicated and varies based on where you are; Alice will win in some places and lose in others, depending on whether the contract they signed contained an "entire agreement" clause (which amounts to some magic words, really) and the law of the place of the contract.[[/note]] Of course, Law French was around so long that a lot of Law French words have seeped into the common language and are not even recognized as French in contemporary English: see "recovery," "tort," "trove," "remainder," "jury," "larceny," "parole," "attorney," "plaintiff," "defendant," "mortgage," "culprit"...

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* For many of the same reasons that the British royals, French--especially Old French--is common in the legal profession in states adopting UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw. That reason being--the common law was first established under the Old French-speaking Normans and Angevins, particularly [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet Henry II Curtmantle]]. Thus for several centuries, the official language of the English courts was, oddly, French--specifically a formal register of the Norman dialects of Old and Middle French known as Norman Law French. Eventually, the law courts began to use English, but not before the English lawyers used when not before the courts was thoroughly peppered with Law French words and phrases. Like the [[AltumVidetur Latin phrases]] in the law, much of the French really is gratuitous (e.g. ''profit a pendre'', which means ''exactly the same thing'' as the perfectly serviceable--if equally inscrutable--English phrase "right of common"). On the other hand, some is semi-necessary, e.g. ''pur autre vie'': while it could be and sometimes is replaced with "for the term of another life," the French is a lot more concise. In a few cases, the French really is necessary, like the word ''parol'' in "parol evidence": although the term means "oral" or "spoken" in the original French, this rule of contract law banning the use of oral pre-contract understandings to contradict written contracts now also--if not primarily--applies to written pre-contract understandings, and couldn't be really expressed with another more "English" word.[[note]]If you're confused by this: (1) you're like most lawyers, including many contract lawyers and (2) consider this example: Alice wants to buy Bob's computer, as she needs a computer and Bob's computer has a really cool Batman sticker on it. She dashes off an e-mail to Bob asking if Bob is willing to sell her the computer along with the sticker, and Bob sends and email back saying he'd be happy to. Alice and Bob meet and draft a contract of sale on the computer, saying that they will exchange Bob's computer for Alice's money the following Friday; the contract makes no mention of the Batman sticker. That Friday comes along and Bob shows up with the computer, but has taken the sticker off. Alice might then sue Bob for breach of contract, because she believed that the Batman sticker was part of the deal; deal. Meanwhile, Bob will defend on the basis of the parol evidence rule (among other things--he (he might also have some sale-of-goods defenses under something like the American Uniform Commercial Code, as this Code or the British Sale of Goods Act 1979, but we won't get into that) and therefore the Batman sticker is a sale not part of goods), the contract. Bob's argument is tenable because the emails were written before the contract and so thus are "parol evidence"--even evidence" even though they are writings and not spoken, as implied by the original meaning of the word "parol(e)"--and therefore not part of the contract. What happens in the lawsuit "parol(e)". Whether Bob's argument wins is complicated and varies based on where you are; Alice will win in some places and lose in others, depending on whether the contract they signed contained an "entire agreement" clause (which amounts to some magic words, really) and the law of the place jurisdiction of the contract.[[/note]] Of course, Law French was around so long that a lot of Law French words have seeped into the common language and are not even recognized as French in contemporary English: see "recovery," "tort," "trove," "remainder," "jury," "larceny," "parole," "attorney," "plaintiff," "defendant," "mortgage," "culprit"...
15th Jan '18 9:33:14 PM jormis29
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* For no other reason but to make Constance Bennett be even sexier, she sings a random French song in ''Film/WhatPriceHollywood''.

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* For no other reason but to make Constance Bennett Creator/ConstanceBennett be even sexier, she sings a random French song in ''Film/WhatPriceHollywood''.
12th Jan '18 7:48:32 PM donwarr1995
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* ''Series/TheGreatBritishBakeOff'': If a bake deals with a specific nationality Mel and Sue won't just imitate the accent, they'll speak in the language of the country of origin when making announcements. French is just one of the many languages they've spoken... sort of... in the Bake Off Tent.
3rd Jan '18 11:21:53 PM petewarrior
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🇧🇩 For French Cursing 101 and an analysis of this sentence, just check [[http://www.medinoc.fr/web/divers/Understanding%20French%20insults.htm here]]. In the French version of the movie, the Merovingian still speaks French. (Cue most French viewers almost expecting the characters to look at each other, giggle and go, "Yeah... ''And''?")

to:

🇧🇩 :: For French Cursing 101 and an analysis of this sentence, just check [[http://www.medinoc.fr/web/divers/Understanding%20French%20insults.htm here]]. In the French version of the movie, the Merovingian still speaks French. (Cue most French viewers almost expecting the characters to look at each other, giggle and go, "Yeah... ''And''?")
3rd Jan '18 11:15:42 PM petewarrior
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:: For French Cursing 101 and an analysis of this sentence, just check [[http://www.medinoc.fr/web/divers/Understanding%20French%20insults.htm here]]. In the French version of the movie, the Merovingian still speaks French. (Cue most French viewers almost expecting the characters to look at each other, giggle and go, "Yeah... ''And''?")

to:

:: 🇧🇩 For French Cursing 101 and an analysis of this sentence, just check [[http://www.medinoc.fr/web/divers/Understanding%20French%20insults.htm here]]. In the French version of the movie, the Merovingian still speaks French. (Cue most French viewers almost expecting the characters to look at each other, giggle and go, "Yeah... ''And''?")



* The ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series throws this around a little: The 'Les Enfants Terribles' project and 'Militaires Sans Frontières' to name a couple of instances.
** Neither of these really qualify as gratuitous ''en soi''. Les Enfants Terribles is named after Jean Cocteau's novel of the same name and the [[IncrediblyLamePun Médecins sans Frontières pun]] wouldn't really work in any other language.

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* The Mostly justified in the ''Franchise/MetalGear'' series throws this around a little: series:
**
The 'Les "Les Enfants Terribles' project and 'Militaires Sans Frontières' to name a couple of instances.
** Neither of these really qualify as gratuitous ''en soi''. Les Enfants Terribles is
Terribles" project, named after Jean Cocteau's novel of the same name and the name
** "Militaires Sans Frontières" is a
[[IncrediblyLamePun Médecins sans Frontières pun]] wouldn't really work pun]].
** Pieuvre Armement's name and motto "Les tentacules de la pieuvre pour votre guerre!"[[note]]Arms of the octopus, arms for your war![[/note]] is because it's based
in any other language.France.
3rd Jan '18 2:43:41 PM NewMexico
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* In '''Film/{{Call Me By Your Name}}, characters all speak French among each other, including the protagonist's parents. Helps that most of the cast is actually French.
22nd Dec '17 10:21:42 AM Malady
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* For many of the same reasons that the British royals, French--especially Old French--is common in the legal profession in states adopting UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw. That reason being--the common law was first established under the Old French-speaking Normans and Angevins, particularly [[TheHouseOfPlantagenet Henry II Curtmantle]]. Thus for several centuries, the official language of the English courts was, oddly, French--specifically a formal register of the Norman dialects of Old and Middle French known as Norman Law French. Eventually, the law courts began to use English, but not before the English lawyers used when not before the courts was thoroughly peppered with Law French words and phrases. Like the [[AltumVidetur Latin phrases]] in the law, much of the French really is gratuitous (e.g. ''profit a pendre'', which means ''exactly the same thing'' as the perfectly serviceable--if equally inscrutable--English phrase "right of common"). On the other hand, some is semi-necessary, e.g. ''pur autre vie'': while it could be and sometimes is replaced with "for the term of another life," the French is a lot more concise. In a few cases, the French really is necessary, like the word ''parol'' in "parol evidence": although the term means "oral" or "spoken" in the original French, this rule of contract law banning the use of oral pre-contract understandings to contradict written contracts now also--if not primarily--applies to written pre-contract understandings, and couldn't be really expressed with another more "English" word.[[note]]If you're confused by this: (1) you're like most lawyers, including many contract lawyers and (2) consider this example: Alice wants to buy Bob's computer, as she needs a computer and Bob's computer has a really cool Batman sticker on it. She dashes off an e-mail to Bob asking if Bob is willing to sell her the computer along with the sticker, and Bob sends and email back saying he'd be happy to. Alice and Bob meet and draft a contract of sale on the computer, saying that they will exchange Bob's computer for Alice's money the following Friday; the contract makes no mention of the Batman sticker. That Friday comes along and Bob shows up with the computer, but has taken the sticker off. Alice might then sue Bob for breach of contract, because she believed that the Batman sticker was part of the deal; Bob will defend on the basis of the parol evidence rule (among other things--he might also have some defenses under the Uniform Commercial Code, as this is a sale of goods), because the emails were written before the contract and so are "parol evidence"--even though they are writings and not spoken, as implied by the original meaning of the word "parol(e)"--and therefore not part of the contract. What happens in the lawsuit is complicated and varies based on where you are; Alice will win in some places and lose in others, depending on whether the contract they signed contained an "entire agreement" clause (which amounts to some magic words, really) and the law of the place of the contract.[[/note]] Of course, Law French was around so long that a lot of Law French words have seeped into the common language and are not even recognized as French in contemporary English: see "recovery," "tort," "trove," "remainder," "jury," "larceny," "parole," "attorney," "plaintiff," "defendant," "mortgage," "culprit"...

to:

* For many of the same reasons that the British royals, French--especially Old French--is common in the legal profession in states adopting UsefulNotes/TheCommonLaw. That reason being--the common law was first established under the Old French-speaking Normans and Angevins, particularly [[TheHouseOfPlantagenet [[UsefulNotes/TheHouseOfPlantagenet Henry II Curtmantle]]. Thus for several centuries, the official language of the English courts was, oddly, French--specifically a formal register of the Norman dialects of Old and Middle French known as Norman Law French. Eventually, the law courts began to use English, but not before the English lawyers used when not before the courts was thoroughly peppered with Law French words and phrases. Like the [[AltumVidetur Latin phrases]] in the law, much of the French really is gratuitous (e.g. ''profit a pendre'', which means ''exactly the same thing'' as the perfectly serviceable--if equally inscrutable--English phrase "right of common"). On the other hand, some is semi-necessary, e.g. ''pur autre vie'': while it could be and sometimes is replaced with "for the term of another life," the French is a lot more concise. In a few cases, the French really is necessary, like the word ''parol'' in "parol evidence": although the term means "oral" or "spoken" in the original French, this rule of contract law banning the use of oral pre-contract understandings to contradict written contracts now also--if not primarily--applies to written pre-contract understandings, and couldn't be really expressed with another more "English" word.[[note]]If you're confused by this: (1) you're like most lawyers, including many contract lawyers and (2) consider this example: Alice wants to buy Bob's computer, as she needs a computer and Bob's computer has a really cool Batman sticker on it. She dashes off an e-mail to Bob asking if Bob is willing to sell her the computer along with the sticker, and Bob sends and email back saying he'd be happy to. Alice and Bob meet and draft a contract of sale on the computer, saying that they will exchange Bob's computer for Alice's money the following Friday; the contract makes no mention of the Batman sticker. That Friday comes along and Bob shows up with the computer, but has taken the sticker off. Alice might then sue Bob for breach of contract, because she believed that the Batman sticker was part of the deal; Bob will defend on the basis of the parol evidence rule (among other things--he might also have some defenses under the Uniform Commercial Code, as this is a sale of goods), because the emails were written before the contract and so are "parol evidence"--even though they are writings and not spoken, as implied by the original meaning of the word "parol(e)"--and therefore not part of the contract. What happens in the lawsuit is complicated and varies based on where you are; Alice will win in some places and lose in others, depending on whether the contract they signed contained an "entire agreement" clause (which amounts to some magic words, really) and the law of the place of the contract.[[/note]] Of course, Law French was around so long that a lot of Law French words have seeped into the common language and are not even recognized as French in contemporary English: see "recovery," "tort," "trove," "remainder," "jury," "larceny," "parole," "attorney," "plaintiff," "defendant," "mortgage," "culprit"...
21st Dec '17 11:41:49 PM Gamermaster
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* Justified in chapter 20 of ''Manga/KaguyaSamaWaKokurasetai'', which had a party for some French students visiting from overseas. It's even a plot point that Shiroganes grasp of the language is very basic and can't understand what everyone else is saying.
21st Dec '17 11:35:56 PM Gamermaster
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* Justified in chapter 20 of ''Manga/KaguyaSamaWaKokurasetai'', which had a party for some French students visiting from overseas. It's even a plot point that Shiroganes grasp of the language is very basic and can't understand what everyone else is saying.
11th Dec '17 9:39:42 AM Spindriver
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* ContinuityReboot ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', despite being more prone to English borrowings, has the French phrase, ''A Suivre'' on its ToBeContinued card, to go along with Alphonse Mucha-esque UsefulNotes/ArtNouveau imagery.

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* ContinuityReboot ''Anime/SailorMoonCrystal'', despite being more prone to English borrowings, has the French phrase, ''A Suivre'' on its ToBeContinued card, to go along with Alphonse Mucha-esque Creator/AlphonseMucha-esque UsefulNotes/ArtNouveau imagery.
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