History Main / GrandFatherClause

10th May '17 8:16:09 AM nighttrainfm
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** Jack Harkness' WWII-era IconicOutfit is an in-canon example of this -- though we do first meet up with Jack in the '40s, he's actually from the 51st century. Though he wears more modern clothing for the rest of series 1, after his return two years later and into his spinoff, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' he keeps his braces and greatcoat. ("Period military is not the dress of a straight man.") In a flashback to British India in 1909, he wears the uniform of a British Army captain of ''that'' era.
** ''Doctor Who'''s extreme and distracting YouLookFamiliar right from the very early days - such as having Peter Purves play both a WackyWaysideTribe {{Eagleland}}er and the new companion Steven Taylor in the same story for no reason, or by having a prison guard who shoots the Fifth Doctor go on to play the Sixth Doctor - allowed it to carry on doing this in the new show, even though the NoBudget that made this forgivable in the Classic days has been expanded to a level that this casting would be considered laughable. For instance, since 2005, two companions so far (Martha and Amy), and [[Creator/PeterCapaldi the Twelfth Doctor]] himself have been played by actors who first showed up in one-shot roles.

to:

** Jack Harkness' WWII-era IconicOutfit is an in-canon example of this -- though we do first meet up with Jack in the '40s, he's actually from the 51st century. Though he wears more modern clothing for the rest of series 1, after his return two years later and into his spinoff, ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'' he keeps his braces and greatcoat. ("Period military is not the dress code of a straight man.") In a flashback to British India in 1909, he wears the uniform of a British Army captain of ''that'' era.
** ''Doctor Who'''s extreme and distracting YouLookFamiliar right from the very early days - such as having Peter Purves play both a WackyWaysideTribe {{Eagleland}}er and the new companion Steven Taylor in the same story for no reason, or by having a prison guard who shoots the Fifth Doctor go on to play the Sixth Doctor - allowed it to carry on doing this in the new show, even though the NoBudget that made this forgivable forgiveable in the Classic days has been expanded to a level that this casting would be considered laughable. For instance, since 2005, two companions so far (Martha and Amy), Amy) and [[Creator/PeterCapaldi the Twelfth Doctor]] himself have been played by actors who first showed up in one-shot roles.
10th May '17 2:24:02 AM Shadao
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** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deception, and his movie incarnation didn't really have it. But the character from the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).

to:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deception, Decepticons, and his movie incarnation didn't really have it. But the character from the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).
10th May '17 2:18:17 AM Shadao
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** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptionn, and his movie incarnation didn't really have it. But the character from the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).

to:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptionn, Deception, and his movie incarnation didn't really have it. But the character from the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).
10th May '17 2:17:20 AM Shadao
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** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptionn, and his movie incarnation didn't even try to overthrow him. But the character from the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).

to:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptionn, and his movie incarnation didn't even try to overthrow him.really have it. But the character from the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).
10th May '17 2:15:41 AM Shadao
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** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptionn, and his movie incarnation didn't even try to overthrow him. But the character from ''Generation 1'' cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).

to:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptionn, and his movie incarnation didn't even try to overthrow him. But the character from ''Generation 1'' the original cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).
10th May '17 2:13:55 AM Shadao
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** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}} and like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's treacherous desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptions and some, like his movie incarnation, didn't even try to usurp him. But the character from ''Generation 1'' cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry personality and actions (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).

to:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}} and Franchise/{{Transformers}}. And like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's treacherous desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptions Deceptionn, and some, like his movie incarnation, incarnation didn't even try to usurp overthrow him. But the character from ''Generation 1'' cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry personality and actions character (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).
10th May '17 2:09:53 AM Shadao
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}} and like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's treacherous desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptions (and some, like his movie incarnation, didn't even try to usurp him). But the character from ''Generation 1'' cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry personality and actions.

to:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}} and like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's treacherous desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptions (and and some, like his movie incarnation, didn't even try to usurp him).him. But the character from ''Generation 1'' cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry personality and actions.actions (such as his open ambition, overly egoistic to a fault, seizing every opportunity to usurp his leader, and failing miserably).
10th May '17 2:07:15 AM Shadao
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Added DiffLines:

** TheStarscream: The trope is named after [[TheDragon Starscream]] from Franchise/{{Transformers}} and like every other character-named tropes, not everyone has heard of Starscream's treacherous desire to usurp [[BigBad Megatron]] as leader of the Deceptions (and some, like his movie incarnation, didn't even try to usurp him). But the character from ''Generation 1'' cartoon was so infamous for his countless (failed) attempts to overthrow Megatron ([[ExaggeratedTrope to the point that he declares himself leader after Megatron falls down from one blast]]) that his name has become synonymous with treachery. It also helps that there's not a single word that encompasses Starscream's power-hungry personality and actions.
2nd May '17 12:26:35 PM BatmanKalEl
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** Consider Bart's status as a "bad boy." In the show's early seasons, contemporaneous shows featured similar "bad boy" characters, and Bart fit right in. By TheNewTens, when ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is a {{Long Runner|s}}, shows have moved on and made Bart's worst behaviors seem almost quaint. Likewise, the police's KeystoneKops routine is quite old-fashioned, and the police force even has old revolvers, but in the late 1980's and early 90's it fit nicely with the show's comedic parody of old sitcoms. All that dated styling is now part of the show's milieu as The Simpsons has stopped being about parodying other shows and is now about parodying itself with bits of barbed satire thrown in. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the "Cartoon Wars" story arc from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', where Cartman meets Bart Simpson himself. Bart brags about how much of a bad boy he supposedly is, citing the incident where he decapitated the statue of Springfield's founder. Cartman responds by calmly recounting the episode where [[DisproportionateRetribution he arranged the deaths of Scott Tennorman's parents, and then chopped up the corpses and fed them to the boy]].

to:

** Consider Bart's status as a "bad boy." In the show's early seasons, contemporaneous shows featured similar "bad boy" characters, and Bart fit right in. By TheNewTens, when ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' is a {{Long Runner|s}}, shows have moved on and made Bart's worst behaviors seem almost quaint. Likewise, the police's KeystoneKops Keystone Kops routine is quite old-fashioned, and the police force even has old revolvers, but in the late 1980's and early 90's it fit nicely with the show's comedic parody of old sitcoms. All that dated styling is now part of the show's milieu as The Simpsons has stopped being about parodying other shows and is now about parodying itself with bits of barbed satire thrown in. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in the "Cartoon Wars" story arc from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'', where Cartman meets Bart Simpson himself. Bart brags about how much of a bad boy he supposedly is, citing the incident where he decapitated the statue of Springfield's founder. Cartman responds by calmly recounting the episode where [[DisproportionateRetribution he arranged the deaths of Scott Tennorman's parents, and then chopped up the corpses and fed them to the boy]].
7th Apr '17 4:57:18 PM BatmanKalEl
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*** In a way, ''The Simpsons'' has been the victim of its own success on that point. Back when "offensive" was the show's entire selling point, strangling a child was easy to shrug off as just a joke (albeit a sick one). But now that the show is beloved by viewers of all generations and even by some religious figures, they have to be at least a ''little'' family-friendly.

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***
**
In a way, ''The Simpsons'' has been the victim of its own success on that point. Back when "offensive" was the show's entire selling point, strangling a child was easy to shrug off as just a joke (albeit a sick one). But now that the show is beloved by viewers of all generations and even by some religious figures, they have to be at least a ''little'' family-friendly.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GrandFatherClause