History Main / GoodRepublicEvilEmpire

3rd Feb '18 2:43:48 PM Discar
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* Played straight and subverted in ''{{Franchise/Gundam}}'' metaseries, both TheFederation and TheEmpire [[GrayAndGrayMorality never portrayed as completely good or evil]], TheKingdom is often the only one that's LawfulGood or NeutralGood, but tend to be powerless and portrayed as a victim of the war raging between aforementioned larger factions.

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* Played straight and subverted in ''{{Franchise/Gundam}}'' metaseries, both TheFederation and TheEmpire [[GrayAndGrayMorality never portrayed as completely good or evil]], TheKingdom TheGoodKingdom is often the only one that's LawfulGood or NeutralGood, but tend to be powerless and portrayed as a victim of the war raging between aforementioned larger factions.



* Subverted in ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', in which the titular city is ruled by [[TheKingdom a single hereditary lord and his advisers]], and the antagonistic Luskan is ruled by a dictatorial council of five High Captains backed by the might of the Host Tower.

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* Subverted in ''VideoGame/NeverwinterNights'', in which the titular city is ruled by [[TheKingdom a single hereditary lord and his advisers]], advisers, and the antagonistic Luskan is ruled by a dictatorial council of five High Captains backed by the might of the Host Tower.
14th Nov '17 7:05:56 AM MasterN
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The good guys are often democratic members of TheFederation, or at least led by some sort of council. If there is a monarch, she ([[WomenAreWiser it's usually a]] [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]) will always listen to her advisers and, if she has a veto, would never dream of overruling the prime minister or chief commander. The SupportingLeader is often a member of this council. In some cases, the council's commitment to consensus rule may get in the way of taking action against the villains; this can provide drama for an episode, as the [[FiveManBand heroes]] have to take matters into their own hands and act without the approval of their bosses.

The villains, on the other hand, will usually be a [[TheEmpire totalitarian dictatorship]] led by a single [[TheEmperor supreme king or emperor]]. He ([[FemalesAreMoreInnocent it's usually a he]]) may have a council of advisers, but with the exception of TheStarscream, none of them are in any doubt as to who is really the boss. If there is such a council, it will be hand-picked by the BigBad rather than being elected or passing some sort of qualification test, and will often include TheDragon.

This trope at times can be ''so'' strong that any monarchies featured within the story (either good or evil) will be converted into democracies or republics by the story's end, just to show how superior democracy is as a form of government. These transitions nearly always happen more smoothly than they would in real life. There's no jockeying for power by TheRemnant: those who want to keep the monarchy going, the kindly prince who gracefully abdicates would never find himself a target of assassination either by enemies of his former administration or by fanatics who see him as a class-traitor, kingdoms never find themselves splitting up into smaller groups acrimoniously opposed to each other, and of course the Republic doesn't face issues concerning class, economy and wealth distribution.

This trope originates in the wake of the success of anti-monarchical revolutions, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. The American Revolution is commonly invoked as an example of brave Americans fighting for democracy and freedom from the tyrannical British monarchy. [[note]]Although, ironically, the war was a {{subversion}} of this trope, seeing as both sides were democratic: Britain was a ''constitutional'' monarchy, remember. The Americans were also backed by the absolute monarch of France UsefulNotes/LouisXVI who would invite his own revolution in turn; ''which was inspired by the very revolution he'd supported''[[/note]] The French Revolution is also portrayed like this though with greater focus on fears of mob rule, with the revolutionaries more likely to be shown as {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s or HeWhoFightsMonsters. In either case, neither revolution is shown in the context of its time and place, with attention to its complexity and multiple causes. So it directly feeds into this trope's binary opposition between a Republic that is Good and an Empire or Kingdom that is Bad. What both revolutions did achieve was that it was the first time it proved that a republic can govern and rule over a large area of land, taking apart what was formerly believed to be the main argument in favor of Kingdoms, that republics were good for city states but not for large areas.

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The good guys are often democratic members of TheFederation, or at least led by some sort of council. If there is a monarch, she ([[WomenAreWiser it's usually a]] [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]) princess]], occasionally a [[TheHighQueen queen]]) will always listen to her advisers and, if she has a veto, would never dream of overruling the prime minister or chief commander. The SupportingLeader is often a member of this council. In some cases, the council's commitment to consensus rule may get in the way of taking action against the villains; this can provide drama for an episode, as the [[FiveManBand heroes]] have to take matters into their own hands and act without the approval of their bosses.

The villains, on the other hand, will usually be a [[TheEmpire totalitarian dictatorship]] led by a single [[TheEmperor supreme king or emperor]]. He emperor]] ([[FemalesAreMoreInnocent it's usually a he]]) man]]), or sometimes a [[GodSaveUsFromTheQueen queen or empress]]. The dictator may have a council of advisers, but with the exception of TheStarscream, none of them are in any doubt as to who is really the boss. If there is such a council, it will be hand-picked by the BigBad rather than being elected or passing some sort of qualification test, and will often include TheDragon.

This trope at times can be ''so'' strong that any monarchies featured within the story (either good or evil) will be converted into democracies or republics by the story's end, just to show how superior democracy is as a form of government. These transitions nearly always happen more smoothly than they would in real life. There's no jockeying for power by TheRemnant: those who want to keep the monarchy going, the going. The kindly prince who gracefully abdicates would never find himself a target of assassination either by enemies of his former administration or by fanatics who see him as a class-traitor, kingdoms never find themselves [[AHouseDivided splitting up into smaller groups acrimoniously opposed to each other, other,]] and of course the Republic doesn't face issues concerning class, economy and wealth distribution.

This trope originates in the wake of the success of anti-monarchical revolutions, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. The American Revolution is commonly invoked as an example of brave Americans fighting for democracy and freedom from the tyrannical British monarchy. [[note]]Although, ironically, the war was a {{subversion}} of this trope, seeing as both sides were democratic: Britain was a ''constitutional'' monarchy, remember. The Americans were also backed by the absolute monarch of France UsefulNotes/LouisXVI who would invite his own revolution in turn; ''which was inspired by the very revolution he'd supported''[[/note]] The French Revolution is also portrayed like this though with greater focus on [[ReignOfTerror fears of mob rule, rule,]] with the [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized revolutionaries more likely to be shown as as]] {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s or HeWhoFightsMonsters. In either case, neither revolution is shown in the context of its time and place, with attention to its complexity and multiple causes. So it directly feeds into this trope's [[BlackAndWhiteMorality binary opposition opposition]] between a [[AlwaysLawfulGood Republic that is Good Good]] and an [[AlwaysChaoticEvil Empire or Kingdom that is Bad. Bad.]] What both revolutions did achieve was that it was the first time it proved that a republic can govern and rule over a large area of land, taking apart what was formerly believed to be the main argument in favor of Kingdoms, that republics were good for city states but not for large areas.
14th Nov '17 6:54:08 AM MasterN
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The good guys are often democratic members of TheFederation, or at least led by some sort of council. If there is a monarch, she ([[WomenAreWiser it's usually a]] [[TheHighQueen queen]] or [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]) will always listen to her advisers and, if she has a veto, would never dream of overruling the prime minister or chief commander. The SupportingLeader is often a member of this council. In some cases, the council's commitment to consensus rule may get in the way of taking action against the villains; this can provide drama for an episode, as the [[FiveManBand heroes]] have to take matters into their own hands and act without the approval of their bosses.

to:

The good guys are often democratic members of TheFederation, or at least led by some sort of council. If there is a monarch, she ([[WomenAreWiser it's usually a]] [[TheHighQueen queen]] or [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]) will always listen to her advisers and, if she has a veto, would never dream of overruling the prime minister or chief commander. The SupportingLeader is often a member of this council. In some cases, the council's commitment to consensus rule may get in the way of taking action against the villains; this can provide drama for an episode, as the [[FiveManBand heroes]] have to take matters into their own hands and act without the approval of their bosses.
15th Oct '17 7:02:27 PM PaulA
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* Subverted in the ''Literature/CoDominium'' series, were the resistance often want republican forms of government, but [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized often use violent and unethical methods to achieve their goals]], or end up being {{hypocrite}}s. True Empires (led by a constitutional monarchy) are often portrayed as positive (or at least not as malevolent).
** Well, sort of; In the ''Warworld'' series, the First Empire fell as much from corruption and factionalism as from the Sauron Rebellion, and the Second Empire is portrayed as fanatical {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s in ''King David's Spaceship'' and described as being in a slow decline in ''The Gripping Hand''.

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* Subverted in the ''Literature/CoDominium'' series, were where the resistance often want republican forms of government, but [[TheRevolutionWillNotBeCivilized often use violent and unethical methods to achieve their goals]], or end up being {{hypocrite}}s. True Empires (led by a constitutional monarchy) are often portrayed as positive (or at least not as malevolent).
** Well, sort of; In the ''Warworld'' ''Literature/WarWorld'' series, the First Empire fell as much from corruption and factionalism as from the Sauron Rebellion, and the Second Empire is portrayed as fanatical {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s in ''King David's Spaceship'' ''Literature/KingDavidsSpaceship'' and described as being in a slow decline in ''The Gripping Hand''.''Literature/TheGrippingHand''.
22nd Sep '17 8:47:22 AM lalalei2001
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/SpacePOP'', Geela overthrows the kings and queens of the Pentangle and declares herself Empress.
19th Sep '17 10:38:50 PM MasterN
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The good guys are often democratic members of TheFederation, or at least led by some sort of council. If there is a monarch, she (it's usually a queen or [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]) will always listen to her advisers and, if she has a veto, would never dream of overruling the prime minister or chief commander. The SupportingLeader is often a member of this council. In some cases, the council's commitment to consensus rule may get in the way of taking action against the villains; this can provide drama for an episode, as the [[FiveManBand heroes]] have to take matters into their own hands and act without the approval of their bosses.

to:

The good guys are often democratic members of TheFederation, or at least led by some sort of council. If there is a monarch, she (it's ([[WomenAreWiser it's usually a queen a]] [[TheHighQueen queen]] or [[EverythingsBetterWithPrincesses princess]]) will always listen to her advisers and, if she has a veto, would never dream of overruling the prime minister or chief commander. The SupportingLeader is often a member of this council. In some cases, the council's commitment to consensus rule may get in the way of taking action against the villains; this can provide drama for an episode, as the [[FiveManBand heroes]] have to take matters into their own hands and act without the approval of their bosses.
19th Sep '17 10:37:49 PM MasterN
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The villains, on the other hand, will usually be a [[TheEmpire totalitarian dictatorship]] led by a single [[TheEmperor supreme king or emperor]]. He (it's usually a he) may have a council of advisers, but with the exception of TheStarscream, none of them are in any doubt as to who is really the boss. If there is such a council, it will be hand-picked by the BigBad rather than being elected or passing some sort of qualification test, and will often include TheDragon.

to:

The villains, on the other hand, will usually be a [[TheEmpire totalitarian dictatorship]] led by a single [[TheEmperor supreme king or emperor]]. He (it's ([[FemalesAreMoreInnocent it's usually a he) he]]) may have a council of advisers, but with the exception of TheStarscream, none of them are in any doubt as to who is really the boss. If there is such a council, it will be hand-picked by the BigBad rather than being elected or passing some sort of qualification test, and will often include TheDragon.
21st Aug '17 11:28:43 AM SeptimusHeap
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* Many books in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse use this trope just as much as the movies did, but not all. Timothy Zahn's novels tend to feature an Empire that's, well, more complex than BlackAndWhiteMorality. In the HandOfThrawn duology, it's not evil at all, and the Supreme Commander is trying to [[PeaceConference make peace]] with the New Republic. Problem is, there are some Imperials who refuse to let that happen...

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* Many books in the Franchise/StarWarsExpandedUniverse use this trope just as much as the movies did, but not all. Timothy Zahn's novels tend to feature an Empire that's, well, more complex than BlackAndWhiteMorality. In the HandOfThrawn Literature/HandOfThrawn duology, it's not evil at all, and the Supreme Commander is trying to [[PeaceConference make peace]] with the New Republic. Problem is, there are some Imperials who refuse to let that happen...
28th Apr '17 6:24:43 PM KrspaceT
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** In ''[[WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated Animated]]'' the Autobots government, while still a republic, appears to be a military dictatorship run by a junta. The High Council has one civilian member Alpha Trion, who mentions that he does not have any power. All the rest appear to be heads of branches of the military with the Magnus acting as chair.

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** In ''[[WesternAnimation/TransformersAnimated Animated]]'' the Autobots government, while still a republic, appears to be a military dictatorship run by a junta. The High Council has one civilian member Alpha Trion, who mentions that he does not have any power. All the rest appear to be heads of branches of the military with the Magnus acting as chair. Meanwhile the expanded universe of Animated notes other galactic governments that include the Decepticon Empire, the Quintesson Pan Galactic Co-Prosperity Sphere, and the Nebulon Republic, with the Republic mentioned as being kind and nice and the Sphere as cutthroat and wicked (by a nominal Decepticon no less).
14th Mar '17 1:24:30 AM Trying2CIt
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This trope originates in the wake of the success of anti-monarchical revolutions, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. The American Revolution is commonly invoked as an example of brave Americans fighting for democracy and freedom from the tyrannical British monarchy. [[note]]Although, ironically, the war was a {{subversion}} of this trope, seeing as both sides were democratic: Britain was a ''constitutional'' monarchy, remember. The Americans were also backed by the absolute monarch of France UsefulNotes/LouisXVI who would invite his own revolution in turn; ''which was inspired by the very revolution he'd supported''[[/note]] The French Revolution is also portrayed like this though with greater focus on fears of mob rule, with the revolutionaries more likely to be shown as {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s or HeWhoFightsMonsters. In either case, neither revolutions are shown in the context of its time and place, with attention to its complexity and multiple causes. So it directly feeds into this trope's binary opposition between a Republic that is Good and an Empire or Kingdom that is Bad. What both revolutions did achieve was that it was the first time it proved that a republic can govern and rule over a large area of land, taking apart what was formerly believed to be the main argument in favor of Kingdoms, that republics were good for city states but not for large areas.

to:

This trope originates in the wake of the success of anti-monarchical revolutions, UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution and UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution. The American Revolution is commonly invoked as an example of brave Americans fighting for democracy and freedom from the tyrannical British monarchy. [[note]]Although, ironically, the war was a {{subversion}} of this trope, seeing as both sides were democratic: Britain was a ''constitutional'' monarchy, remember. The Americans were also backed by the absolute monarch of France UsefulNotes/LouisXVI who would invite his own revolution in turn; ''which was inspired by the very revolution he'd supported''[[/note]] The French Revolution is also portrayed like this though with greater focus on fears of mob rule, with the revolutionaries more likely to be shown as {{Well Intentioned Extremist}}s or HeWhoFightsMonsters. In either case, neither revolutions are revolution is shown in the context of its time and place, with attention to its complexity and multiple causes. So it directly feeds into this trope's binary opposition between a Republic that is Good and an Empire or Kingdom that is Bad. What both revolutions did achieve was that it was the first time it proved that a republic can govern and rule over a large area of land, taking apart what was formerly believed to be the main argument in favor of Kingdoms, that republics were good for city states but not for large areas.



** A republic with a king isn't such a strange idea, depending on how powerful the king is; a state with a figurehead monarch will tend to function as a republic in practice, but since the term "republic" tends to connote the absence of any kind of monarch it will rarely if ever be called that in RealLife.

to:

** A republic with a king isn't such a strange idea, depending on how powerful the king is; a state with a figurehead monarch will tend to function as a republic in practice, but since the term "republic" tends to connote the absence of any kind of monarch it will rarely rarely, if ever ever, be called that in RealLife.
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