History Main / GoldenSnitch

12th Jul '17 7:57:33 AM HumanTorch2
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** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kurt Bush missed several races after suffering an injury in the Daytona 500. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Bush came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions.

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** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kurt Bush Kyle Busch missed several races after suffering an injury a [[{{GameBreakingInjury}} broken leg]] in the Daytona 500.Xfinity Series opener at Daytona. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Bush Busch came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions.restrictions. He then managed to survive all the way to Homestead, and ended up winning the Championship by 3 seconds over defending champion Kevin Harvick.
5th Jul '17 6:11:38 PM nombretomado
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* Played with in ''{{beatmania IIDX}}'': On one hand, every note is worth the same maximum of 2 points to your EX Score. On the other hand, most songs tend to have a DifficultySpike at the very end where the note density suddenly skyrockets. The clear/fail judgment is a straight example, since your LifeMeter must be at 80% or higher at the end of the song or else you fail, making the endings much more important.

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* Played with in ''{{beatmania ''VideoGame/{{beatmania IIDX}}'': On one hand, every note is worth the same maximum of 2 points to your EX Score. On the other hand, most songs tend to have a DifficultySpike at the very end where the note density suddenly skyrockets. The clear/fail judgment is a straight example, since your LifeMeter must be at 80% or higher at the end of the song or else you fail, making the endings much more important.
5th Jul '17 1:50:34 PM Gimere
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* "Talkin' 'bout Your Generation" does this ''every episode'' so that the final challenge is always a three-way tie. Since no prizes are won, and the game is just for laughs, it is somewhat justified.

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* "Talkin' 'bout Your Generation" does this ''every episode'' so The very last round of ''Series/TalkinBoutYourGeneration'' is always worth one point more than the difference between the losing time and the winning team, "which means that anyone can win!". Of course, ThePointsMeanNothing anyway; the only real stakes are bragging rights.
** Although subverted, though definitely not averted, in Episode 26 wherein it was worth ''one million points''. Which was still well and truly enough that anyone could win, but there was no "exactly" about it.
*** On at least one occasion, Shaun just admitted he didn't remember what the score was and set
the final challenge is always a three-way tie. Since no prizes are won, and the game is just for laughs, it is somewhat justified.round at an arbitrarily high number of points.



* Spanish TV contest ''Gafapastas'' is a real-life shining example of this. It has five rounds, the first four are worth 600 if you manage to do everything perfectly and the last one is ''1200'' for the same. Not only that, but while the first four are individual rounds (Meaning both players can get the 600), the last one is head-to-head answer-this-first squareoff, so a losing player can quickly CurbStompBattle their opponent and win by with a huge margin. The current champion has won many games simply because he's really good at the last round. The worst part? For a while, it was 800 for the first 4 rounds and 800 for the last. That's right, they changed it to make the rounds MORE unbalanced!

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* Spanish TV contest ''Gafapastas'' is a real-life shining example of this. It has five rounds, the first four are worth 600 if you manage to do everything perfectly and the last one is ''1200'' for the same. Not only that, but while the first four are individual rounds (Meaning both players can get the 600), the last one is head-to-head answer-this-first squareoff, so a losing player can quickly CurbStompBattle their opponent and win by with a huge margin. The current champion has won many games simply because he's really good at the last round. The worst part? For a while, it was 800 for the first 4 rounds and 800 for the last. That's right, they changed it to make the rounds MORE ''more'' unbalanced!



* Even though teams on ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' have their time disparities preserved across legs (if you checked in N minutes after the first team on the previous leg, you have to wait N minutes after the first team departs on the current leg before you can depart), the show will usually set up an equalizer near the start of every leg where all the contestants end up arriving at an airport several hours before the first flight, or (more uncommonly) at a task location hours before it opens. The vast majority of the time, this wipes out most if not all advantages and disadvantages between teams had from the previous leg[[note]]Exceptions do happen, albeit very rarely, such as Nick & Vicki in Season 18 - at over 6 hours behind the second-to-last team, they couldn't make it onto the same flight as the other teams, and ended up 9 hours behind by the time they arrived in South Korea[[/note]]. However, demonstrating that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]], the first season's lack of these equalizers led to two teams being over 12 hours ahead of the rest by the end of leg 9, making the game essentially {{Unwinnable}} for the rest and making most of the remainder a ForegoneConclusion.
** They also have none-announced "non-elimination" rounds, which, since the idea is to be the last team standing, makes the entire leg pointless. The first team may, or may not, win a prize but all teams continue to the next leg and the order in which they arrived really does nothing to alter the odds. They also have "Fast Forwards" which if completed first allow one team to skip over all other tasks. It has however happened a handful of times that the fast forward has been completed, but still didn't win the team first place, typically due to long commute times or getting lost.
* In ''Series/CanadasWorstDriver'', the Worst Driver trophy is generally given to the contestant who did the worst on the final challenge, regardless of how well (or badly) they did on the earlier challenges. The final challenge is driving on public roads, which is by far the most important test of the person's driving ability.



* The very last round of ''Seroes/TalkinBoutYourGeneration'' is always worth one point more than the difference between the losing time and the winning team, "which means that anyone can win!". Of course, ThePointsMeanNothing anyway; the only real stakes are bragging rights.
** Although subverted, though definitely not averted, in Episode 26 wherein it was worth ''one million points''. Which was still well and truly enough that anyone could win, but there was no "exactly" about it.
*** On at least one occasion, Shaun just admitted he didn't remember what the score was and set the final round at an arbitrarily high number of points.



* Even though teams on ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' have their time disparities preserved across legs (if you checked in N minutes after the first team on the previous leg, you have to wait N minutes after the first team departs on the current leg before you can depart), the show will usually set up an equalizer near the start of every leg where all the contestants end up arriving at an airport several hours before the first flight, or (more uncommonly) at a task location hours before it opens. The vast majority of the time, this wipes out most if not all advantages and disadvantages between teams had from the previous leg[[note]]Exceptions do happen, albeit very rarely, such as Nick & Vicki in Season 18 - at over 6 hours behind the second-to-last team, they couldn't make it onto the same flight as the other teams, and ended up 9 hours behind by the time they arrived in South Korea[[/note]]. However, demonstrating that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]], the first season's lack of these equalizers led to two teams being over 12 hours ahead of the rest by the end of leg 9, making the game essentially {{Unwinnable}} for the rest and making most of the remainder a ForegoneConclusion.
** They also have none-announced "non-elimination" rounds, which, since the idea is to be the last team standing, makes the entire leg pointless. The first team may, or may not, win a prize but all teams continue to the next leg and the order in which they arrived really does nothing to alter the odds. They also have "Fast Forwards" which if completed first allow one team to skip over all other tasks. It has however happened a handful of times that the fast forward has been completed, but still didn't win the team first place, typically due to long commute times or getting lost.



* In ''Series/CanadasWorstDriver'', the Worst Driver trophy is generally given to the contestant who did the worst on the final challenge, regardless of how well (or badly) they did on the earlier challenges. The final challenge is driving on public roads, which is by far the most important test of the person's driving ability.
1st Jul '17 1:08:19 PM caffeinatedkate
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* In ''Series/{{Swashbuckle}}'', the third round, ''Shipwreck Rummage'' is the only one the team has to win in order to win the whole game. Winning the first two rounds cuts down the amount of items you have to find against the clock in the third but it's still completely possible to lose the first two, then win the third and the game.
11th Jun '17 1:16:05 PM nombretomado
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** Something like this happened twice in [[TheWorldCup World Cups]]. The famous last game of the 1950 World Cup in Brazil was won by Uruguay, practically negating the hosts' two previous dominating victories over their rivals ''and'' winning the Cup for Uruguay. And in 1982, Italy advanced to the second round as the worst team of the top 12 after drawing their three first games, then went on to win their next four games, including the final match, to become World Champions.

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** Something like this happened twice in [[TheWorldCup [[UsefulNotes/TheWorldCup World Cups]]. The famous last game of the 1950 World Cup in Brazil was won by Uruguay, practically negating the hosts' two previous dominating victories over their rivals ''and'' winning the Cup for Uruguay. And in 1982, Italy advanced to the second round as the worst team of the top 12 after drawing their three first games, then went on to win their next four games, including the final match, to become World Champions.
10th Jun '17 10:00:35 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Other Golden Snitches include $10,000 Mystery Round and the "Prize Puzzle", the latter which offers a trip always worth more than $5,000 for simply solving the puzzle. Certain GenreSavvy players will immediately solve a Prize Puzzle, even if they haven't even spun the wheel yet, because they know that the prize itself is worth far more than anything they could hope to win that round and don't want to risk hitting a Lose a Turn or Bankrupt and giving the puzzle (and, by extension, the prize) to another player. In a normal game, where nobody gets a special space like the aforementioned two and they don't get an obscenely large Final Spin, the winner is more often than not the person who won the Prize Puzzle.

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** Other Golden Snitches include $10,000 Mystery Round and the "Prize Puzzle", the latter which offers a trip always worth more than $5,000 for simply solving the puzzle. Certain GenreSavvy players will immediately solve a Prize Puzzle, even if they haven't even spun the wheel yet, because they know that the prize itself is worth far more than anything they could hope to win that round and don't want to risk hitting a Lose a Turn or Bankrupt and giving the puzzle (and, by extension, the prize) to another player. In a normal game, where nobody gets a special space like the aforementioned two and they don't get an obscenely large Final Spin, the winner is more often than not the person who won the Prize Puzzle.
11th May '17 4:21:03 PM komodosp
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* The ''Series/Countdown'' Conundrum (the single-question final round) comes close to being either a GoldenSnitch or completely worthless. Seeing as someone nearly always gets it correct, it doesn't matter if your 9 points ahead or 9 points behind at this stage, the winner is the person who gets this single question correct first, as they will score 10 points and the game will be over. On the other hand, if the gap is more than 10 points, this round will have no impact on the winner.

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* The ''Series/Countdown'' ''Series/{{Countdown}}'' Conundrum (the single-question final round) comes close to being either a GoldenSnitch or completely worthless. Seeing as someone nearly always gets it correct, it doesn't matter if your 9 points ahead or 9 points behind at this stage, the winner is the person who gets this single question correct first, as they will score 10 points and the game will be over. On the other hand, if the gap is more than 10 points, this round will have no impact on the winner.
11th May '17 4:18:57 PM komodosp
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* The ''Series/Countdown'' Conundrum (the single-question final round) comes close to being either a GoldenSnitch or completely worthless. Seeing as someone nearly always gets it correct, it doesn't matter if your 9 points ahead or 9 points behind at this stage, the winner is the person who gets this single question correct first, as they will score 10 points and the game will be over. On the other hand, if the gap is more than 10 points, this round will have no impact on the winner.
29th Apr '17 5:00:41 PM kquinn0830
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* The {{Trope Namer|s}} is the Golden Snitch, a recurring plot device within the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series. While each goal scored in a game of Quidditch is worth 10 points, catching the Snitch scores 150 points and ends the game immediately - meaning unless your team is getting completely curb-stomped, it's a guaranteed win and the rest of the game is a bunch of pointless flailing with balls and sticks.

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* The {{Trope Namer|s}} is the Golden Snitch, a recurring plot device within the ''Literature/HarryPotter'' series. While each goal scored in a game of Quidditch is worth 10 points, catching the Snitch scores 150 points and ends the game immediately - meaning unless your team is getting completely curb-stomped, it's a guaranteed win and the rest of the game is a bunch of pointless flailing with balls and sticks. J.K. Rowling later revealed the reason she created this element of the game was because she got into a fight with her boyfriend and did it as a deliberate TakeThat to [[https://www.theguardian.com/books/interactive/2013/may/18/jk-rowling-harry-potter-philosophers-stone-annotations male sports fans.]]
21st Apr '17 4:06:09 PM themisterfree
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* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': Early in the 1983 U.S. series' run, a contestant who had a $16 or more lead after the final Fame Game playing was virtually guaranteed a win, as just three $15 questions remained. To rub salt in the wound: A dominant contestant could snatch the $25 money card and have it added to his score, which meant that all that would be decided was whether the winning contestant would be playing for a better prize in the shopping round, or need less money the next day to be eligible to win the next prize [[note]](or, in the case of Barbara Philips, a Golden Snitch helped her win all of the prizes plus a $68,000 cash jackpot)[[/note]].

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* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': Early in the 1983 U.S. series' 1980s US run, a contestant who had a $16 or more lead after the final Fame Game playing was virtually guaranteed a win, as just three $15 questions remained. To rub salt in the wound: A dominant contestant could snatch the $25 money card and have it added to his score, which meant that all that would be decided was whether the winning contestant would be playing for a better prize in the shopping round, or need less money the next day to be eligible to win the next prize [[note]](or, in the case of Barbara Philips, a Golden Snitch helped her win all of the prizes plus a [[ProgressiveJackpot $68,000 cash jackpot)[[/note]].jackpot]])[[/note]].



*** The revival, ''Series/{{Whammy}}: The All New Press Your Luck'', also had this but later versions of the show introduced the Big Bank, where all money a player loses to a Whammy goes into the Big Bank. A player that lands on the Big Bank space and then answers a question correctly would snag all the money stored. Since whammies were commonly landed on, the Big Bank usually gotten tons of money stored and this could guarantee that player a surefire win of the whole game if they don't hit a Whammy afterwards.

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*** The revival, ''Series/{{Whammy}}: The All New Press Your Luck'', also had this but later versions of the show second season introduced the Big Bank, [[ProgressiveJackpot where all money money/prizes a player loses to a Whammy goes into the Big Bank. Bank]]. A player that lands on the Big Bank space and then answers a question correctly would snag all the money money/stuff stored. Since whammies Whammies were commonly landed on, the Big Bank usually gotten got tons of money and prizes stored and this could guarantee that player a surefire win of the whole game if they don't hit a Whammy afterwards.afterwards. (However, it would always restart at a base of $3,000 each episode, so it's even less compared to what might've happened if it was a normal rolling jackpot.)



* ''Series/{{Go}}'', a Bob Stewart show where the round values were 250-500-750-1,250, and the winning score is 1,500. If a team wins the first three rounds, to fill the half-hour, they get to play the bonus round twice. However, like the ''Name That Tune'' example, if the first two rounds are split, the third round becomes meaningless.

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* ''Series/{{Go}}'', a Bob Stewart show where the round values were 250-500-750-1,250, $250-$500-$750-$1250, and the winning score is 1,500. $1,500. If a team wins the first three rounds, to fill the half-hour, they get to play the bonus round twice.twice (for a potential $20,000). However, like the ''Name That Tune'' example, if the first two rounds are split, the third round becomes meaningless.



* Similarly, ''Series/SupermarketSweep''[='s=] numerous question rounds simply determined how much time each team got to run through the store in the "Big Sweep" round at the end of the game. The winner of the "Big Sweep" then got to play for the big $5,000 prize.

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* Similarly, ''Series/SupermarketSweep''[='s=] numerous question rounds rounds, Mini-Sweeps and other front game diversions simply determined how much time each team got to run through the store in the "Big Sweep" round at the end of the game. Big Sweep. The winner of the "Big Sweep" Big Sweep then got to play for the big $5,000 prize.prize in the Bonus Sweep.



** In the main game, either contestant could immediately win the game by spinning three Jokers and correctly answering a question in the category of their choice.

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** In the main game, either contestant could immediately win the game by spinning three Jokers and correctly answering a question in the category of their choice. This was even worse during the first week or so of the CBS run- spinning three Jokers would just win you the game, no question needed.



* The "dare" system in Nickelodeon's ''Series/DoubleDare1986'' is similar to the ''Finders Keepers'' example; Each time a question is passed to the other team (known as "daring" the opponent to answer; the controlling team can "dare" the other team to answer, and be "double dared" to answer it in return, after which thy must answer it or take a physical challenge), the dollar value for it is doubled (twice the amount on a "dare", four times the amount on a "double dare"), and if the question is answered wrong while a "dare" or "double dare" was in play (or the physical challenge was not successfully completed), the last team to pass the question gets the money. Savvy players, therefore, could ping-pong a question with their opponents to rack up the cash, then get the answer right or win the physical challenge to net them a huge lead (or give the game to the opponent on a silver platter, if they suck).

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* The "dare" system in Nickelodeon's ''Series/DoubleDare1986'' is similar to the ''Finders Keepers'' example; Each each time a question is passed to the other team (known as "daring" the opponent to answer; the controlling team can "dare" the other team to answer, and be "double dared" to answer it in return, after which thy they must answer it or take a physical challenge), the dollar value for it is doubled (twice the amount on a "dare", four times the amount on a "double dare"), and if the question is answered wrong while a "dare" or "double dare" was in play (or the physical challenge was not successfully completed), the last team to pass the question gets the money. Savvy players, therefore, could ping-pong a question with their opponents to rack up the cash, then get the answer right or win the physical challenge to net them a huge lead (or give the game to the opponent on a silver platter, if they suck).



* Nickelodeon had another show around the same time called ''Series/MakeTheGrade'', where the object was to answer at least one question for every subject and every grade level, thus lighting up your whole board. However, they also had physical challenges called "Fire Drills", where the contestants got to choose which player podium to return to based on how they placed in the Fire Drill. Very often, a contestant who spent the whole game answering questions and building up their board found themselves losing because one of the other contestants placed first in the Fire Drill and stole their board. (The worst ones come when the kid in first place is one question away from winning, then uncovers a Fire Drill and ends up losing their spot to a doofus that can barely tie their shoes, who then stinks up the studio in the Honors Round.)

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* Nickelodeon had another show around the same time called ''Series/MakeTheGrade'', where another Nick game show, was also a big offender. Here, the object was to answer at least one question for every subject and every grade level, thus lighting up your whole board. However, they also had physical challenges called "Fire Drills", where the contestants got to choose which player podium to return to based on how they placed in the Fire Drill. Very often, a contestant who spent the whole game answering questions and building up their board found themselves losing because one of the other contestants placed first in the Fire Drill and stole their board. (The worst ones come when the kid in first place is one question away from winning, then uncovers a Fire Drill and ends up losing their spot to a doofus that can barely tie their shoes, who then stinks up the studio in the Honors Round.)



* ''Masters of the Maze'' had the maze which took up most of the actual show. The previous (question) round determined which teams would go into the maze and which teams would go to the maze first, and the team who made it through the maze the fastest would win the game.

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* ''Masters of the Maze'' ''Series/MastersOfTheMaze'' had the maze which took up most of the actual show. The previous (question) round determined which teams would go into the maze and which teams would go to the maze first, and the team who made it through the maze the fastest would win the game.



** Other Golden Snitches include $10,000 Mystery Round and the "Prize Puzzle," the latter which offers a trip always worth more than $5,000 for simply solving the puzzle. Certain GenreSavvy players will immediately solve a Prize Puzzle, even if they haven't even spun the wheel yet, because they know that the prize itself is worth far more than anything they could hope to win that round and don't want to risk hitting a Lose a Turn or Bankrupt and giving the puzzle (and, by extension, the prize) to another player. In a normal game, where nobody gets a special space like the aforementioned two and they don't get an obscenely large Final Spin, the winner is more often than not the person who won the Prize Puzzle.

to:

** Other Golden Snitches include $10,000 Mystery Round and the "Prize Puzzle," Puzzle", the latter which offers a trip always worth more than $5,000 for simply solving the puzzle. Certain GenreSavvy players will immediately solve a Prize Puzzle, even if they haven't even spun the wheel yet, because they know that the prize itself is worth far more than anything they could hope to win that round and don't want to risk hitting a Lose a Turn or Bankrupt and giving the puzzle (and, by extension, the prize) to another player. In a normal game, where nobody gets a special space like the aforementioned two and they don't get an obscenely large Final Spin, the winner is more often than not the person who won the Prize Puzzle.



* The British show ''Keynotes'' has a particularly bad case of this: £30 for the first round, £60 for the second and £120 for the third. Not that all games were decided by the third round; at least one had a £30-0 victory.
* ''Series/BeatTheClock'', particularly the version hosted by Monty Hall from 1979-80, is a prime example. Even if you were behind by the maximum possible amount of $2,000, the game came down to who could get shuffleboard pucks the furthest. Whoever was in the lead would go both first and last (admittedly a big enough advantage that an upset was uncommon), but as long the farthest puck that hadn't fallen off was yours, you won, ''even if you were behind the entire game!'' And then there was the Gary Kroeger version, which had two: the first had points accumulated translated to positions in an untimed stunt, last to finish is out; the second was a variation on Bid-a-Note from ''Series/NameThatTune'' played between the last two teams (here's a stunt, whoever says they can complete it faster plays; if they fail, they hand the game to their opponent, and the first bid is determined by a trivia question).
** In fact, on the Monty Hall version, the winner of the shufflepuck table round was that day's champion (and got to come back on the next show, unless reaching the $25,000 limit), even if they failed in the "bonus stunt" and ended up behind the other couple (by as much as $2000 to $300).

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* The British [[Series/SaleOfTheCentury Reg Grundy]] show ''Keynotes'' ''Keynotes''[[note]]adapted from an unsold 1986 pilot in the US, and also briefly adapted in Grundy's native Australia as a summer replacement for their ''Sale'' in 1992[[/note]] has a particularly bad case of this: £30 for the first round, £60 for the second and £120 for the third. Not that all games were decided by the third round; at least one had a £30-0 victory.
* ''Series/BeatTheClock'', particularly the version hosted by Monty Hall from 1979-80, is a prime example. Even if you were behind by the maximum possible amount of $2,000, the game came down to who could get shuffleboard pucks the furthest. furthest in the Bonus Shuffle. Whoever was in the lead would go both first and last (admittedly a big enough advantage that an upset was uncommon), but as long the farthest puck that hadn't fallen off was yours, you won, ''even if you were behind the entire game!'' Not only that, but whoever won was that day's champion (and got to come back on the next show, unless reaching the $25,000 limit), even if they failed in the Bonus Stunt and ended up behind the other couple (by as much as $2000 to $300).
**
And then there was the Gary Kroeger version, which had two: the first had points accumulated translated to positions in an untimed stunt, last to finish is out; the second was a variation on Bid-a-Note from ''Series/NameThatTune'' played between the last two teams (here's a stunt, whoever says they can complete it faster plays; if they fail, they hand the game to their opponent, and the first bid is determined by a trivia question).
** In fact, on the Monty Hall version, the winner of the shufflepuck table round was that day's champion (and got to come back on the next show, unless reaching the $25,000 limit), even if they failed in the "bonus stunt" and ended up behind the other couple (by as much as $2000 to $300).
question).



* Parodied in the 1978-79 game show sendup ''Series/TheCheapShow'', which used a 1-1-20 system.

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* Parodied in the 1978-79 game show sendup ''Series/TheCheapShow'', which used a 1-1-20 1-1-''20'' system.



* ''Series/FamilyGameNight'' on Hub awards one "Crazy Cash Card" to each family at the start of the show, then an additional card to the family who wins each game. Most cards are worth no more than $1500 or so (and generally only a couple hundred bucks), but one card is worth anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000. Thus, a family could lose all five games and still win the grand prize if the card they chose happens to be the jackpot one.

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* ''Series/FamilyGameNight'' on Hub awards Creator/TheHub, for the first two seasons, awarded one "Crazy Cash Card" to each family at the start of the show, then an additional card to the family who wins won each game. Most cards are were worth no more than $1500 or so (and generally only a couple hundred bucks), but one card card, the Top Cash Card is worth anywhere from $10,000 to $20,000. Thus, a family could lose all five games and still win the grand prize if the card they chose happens to be the jackpot one.Top Cash Card.



* On the original ''Series/{{Concentration}}'', if a game ends in a draw, a new game is started with each contestant allowed to retain up to three prizes from the draw game. This also applies if time is running out on a show and a puzzle is 3/4ths exposed. The puzzle is revealed, the game is ruled a draw, and a new game is started on the next show with the players allowed to retain up to three prizes from that default draw game.
** On ''Classic Concentration,'' a player can match no prizes, win both games and lose the car round both times, going home with nothing but the consolation prizes they give to the losers. On the original show, a player won $100 winning a game with no matched good prizes (and/or the $500--later a car--bonus for selecting two Wild Cards on the same turn).

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* On the original ''Series/{{Concentration}}'', if a game ends ended in a draw, a new game is was started with each contestant allowed to retain up to three prizes from the draw game. This also applies applied if time is was running out on a show and a puzzle is was 3/4ths exposed. The puzzle is was revealed, the game is ruled a draw, and a new game is started on the next show with the players allowed to retain up to three prizes from that default draw game.
** On ''Classic Concentration,'' a player can could match no prizes, win both games and lose the car round both times, going home with nothing but the consolation prizes they give to the losers. On the original show, a player won $100 winning a game with no matched good prizes (and/or the $500--later a car--bonus for selecting two Wild Cards on the same turn).
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