History Main / GoldenSnitch

9th Oct '17 4:52:11 PM KingLyger
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** Another example is the Triwizard Tournament which is the focal point of the fourth book. While each school representative competes in three challenges scattered throughout the school year victory is determined entirely by who reaches Triwizard Cup first in the final challenge. Performing well in the first two challenges will grant an advantage via a head start however giving those challenges some potential bearing on the outcome.

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** Another example is the Triwizard Tournament which is the focal point of the fourth book. While each school representative competes in three challenges scattered throughout the school year year, victory is determined entirely by who whoever first reaches the Triwizard Cup first in the final challenge. Performing well in the first two challenges will grant an advantage via a head start however start, giving those challenges some potential bearing on the outcome.outcome, but the audience never sees that advantage play out.
5th Oct '17 8:06:10 AM HumanTorch2
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* In the NASCAR Sprint Cup Chase championship format (starting in 2013), winning a single race in the 26 "regular season" races almost guarantees a place in the Chase (the playoffs) as typically multiple races are won by different drivers, usually ensuring there are never more than 16 different winners in a season, and as long as the driver is in the top 30 in points. In the Chase itself, winning a race in a round is an automatic pass to the next round, regardless of the driver's points standings in that round. In the final race of the year at Homestead, the Championship winner has to only place ahead of the remaining three Chase drivers at the end of the race. It is, therefore, theoretically possible for a driver to win a single race during the first 26 to make the Chase but be dead last (30th) in qualifying points, then win a single race in each of the three playoff rounds and not finish the other 6, and then, in the championship race, have the other three Chase drivers crash out on earlier laps, getting the final victory on points without even finishing ''that'' race either.
** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kyle Busch missed several races after suffering a [[{{GameBreakingInjury}} broken leg]] in the Xfinity Series opener at Daytona. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Busch came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions. He then managed to survive all the way to Homestead, and ended up winning the Championship by 3 seconds over defending champion Kevin Harvick.

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* In the NASCAR Sprint Cup Chase championship format (starting in 2013), 2014), winning a single race in the 26 "regular season" races almost guarantees a place in the Chase (the playoffs) as typically multiple races are won by different drivers, usually ensuring there are never more than 16 different winners in a season, and as long as the driver is in the top 30 in points. In the Chase itself, winning a race in a round is an automatic pass to the next round, regardless of the driver's points standings in that round. In the final race of the year at Homestead, the Championship winner has to only place ahead of the remaining three Chase drivers at the end of the race. It is, therefore, theoretically possible for a driver to win a single race during the first 26 to make the Chase but be dead last (30th) in qualifying points, then win a single race in each of the three playoff rounds and not finish the other 6, and then, in the championship race, have the other three Chase drivers crash out on earlier laps, getting the final victory on points without even finishing ''that'' race either.
** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kyle Busch missed several races after suffering a [[{{GameBreakingInjury}} broken leg]] in the Xfinity Series opener at Daytona. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Busch came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions. He then managed to survive all the way to Homestead, Homestead on points alone (no small feat), and ended up winning the Championship by 3 seconds over defending champion Kevin Harvick.
27th Sep '17 9:37:56 AM Gosicrystal
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* Zig-zagged in Spin-Off in ''VideoGame/WiiParty''. When several x2 or x3 spaces are landed on without playing a mini-game, the bank will have an absurd amount of coins the player who wins the next game will usually get an incredible lead. That lead can easily be taken away in a duel mini-game though, where the challenger (who gets to choose their opponent) gets half the opponent's coins if they win. A win here will usually give the challenger a slight lead over their opponent and overall.

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* Zig-zagged in Spin-Off in ''VideoGame/WiiParty''. When several x2 or x3 spaces are landed on without playing a mini-game, the bank will have an absurd amount of coins coins, and the player who wins the next game will usually get an incredible lead. That lead can easily be taken away in a duel mini-game though, where the challenger (who gets to choose their opponent) gets half the opponent's coins if they win. A win here will usually give the challenger a slight lead over their opponent and overall.
22nd Sep '17 10:54:01 PM SMARTALIENQT
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* The legal profession has this UpToEleven: not only does law school follow the tradition of one final exam determining your entire grade, but, past law school, grades are utterly inconsequential compared to the ''real'' test: passing the bar exam. You need to get through law school in order to be allowed to take the bar (and grades are important for the first job or two post-graduation), but ultimately it doesn't matter how stellar your grades are: if you flunk the bar, you can't practice.
16th Sep '17 12:52:11 PM Sharlee
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* This trope, both played straight and inverted, is the ''whole point'' to the board game "Snakes and Ladders". Nothing makes an already-random game's outcome more potentially frustrating than having one's opponent luck into a ''huge'' boost from a long ladder right at the beginning of a round, unless it's to work your own piece's way up to the top row - gradually, roll by roll, bit by bit, with many a short drop along the way - only to land smack dab on a freakin' ''python'' one or two turns from a win.
30th Aug '17 3:51:31 PM HalcyonDayz
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* In the Rampage and Knock-Out game modes of ''[[VideoGame/DiRT DiRT Showdown]]'', which usually last three minutes, the last 30 seconds are worth double points. If you do well enough in these final seconds, and get plenty of KOs, you can snatch a last-minute win unless you're significantly behind.

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* In the Rampage and Knock-Out game modes of ''[[VideoGame/DiRT DiRT Showdown]]'', which usually last three minutes, the last 30 seconds are worth double points. If you do well enough in these final seconds, and get plenty of KOs, [=KOs=], you can snatch a last-minute win unless you're significantly behind.
1st Aug '17 3:00:47 PM cornycrunch
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* The Hand of the King round on ''Pinball/{{GameOfThrones}}'' can become this if played perfectly. Similar to the AC/DC example above, having playfield multipliers will add the multiplied jackpots to a large hurryup that can be collected after collecting several Super Jackpots - which also add their multiplied values to the bank (and your score). If playfield multipliers are still running, that whole bank can be multiplied again by up to 5x. Executing this perfectly can result in a single shot worth well over 5 billion points, in a round that's usually started with a score around 1 billion. Averted somewhat by the need to continually juggle hitting the risky Battering Ram shot at just the right frequency.
12th Jul '17 7:57:33 AM HumanTorch2
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** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kurt Bush missed several races after suffering an injury in the Daytona 500. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Bush came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions.

to:

** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kurt Bush Kyle Busch missed several races after suffering an injury a [[{{GameBreakingInjury}} broken leg]] in the Daytona 500.Xfinity Series opener at Daytona. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Bush Busch came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions.restrictions. He then managed to survive all the way to Homestead, and ended up winning the Championship by 3 seconds over defending champion Kevin Harvick.
5th Jul '17 6:11:38 PM nombretomado
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* Played with in ''{{beatmania IIDX}}'': On one hand, every note is worth the same maximum of 2 points to your EX Score. On the other hand, most songs tend to have a DifficultySpike at the very end where the note density suddenly skyrockets. The clear/fail judgment is a straight example, since your LifeMeter must be at 80% or higher at the end of the song or else you fail, making the endings much more important.

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* Played with in ''{{beatmania ''VideoGame/{{beatmania IIDX}}'': On one hand, every note is worth the same maximum of 2 points to your EX Score. On the other hand, most songs tend to have a DifficultySpike at the very end where the note density suddenly skyrockets. The clear/fail judgment is a straight example, since your LifeMeter must be at 80% or higher at the end of the song or else you fail, making the endings much more important.
5th Jul '17 1:50:34 PM Gimere
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* "Talkin' 'bout Your Generation" does this ''every episode'' so that the final challenge is always a three-way tie. Since no prizes are won, and the game is just for laughs, it is somewhat justified.

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* "Talkin' 'bout Your Generation" does this ''every episode'' so The very last round of ''Series/TalkinBoutYourGeneration'' is always worth one point more than the difference between the losing time and the winning team, "which means that anyone can win!". Of course, ThePointsMeanNothing anyway; the only real stakes are bragging rights.
** Although subverted, though definitely not averted, in Episode 26 wherein it was worth ''one million points''. Which was still well and truly enough that anyone could win, but there was no "exactly" about it.
*** On at least one occasion, Shaun just admitted he didn't remember what the score was and set
the final challenge is always a three-way tie. Since no prizes are won, and the game is just for laughs, it is somewhat justified.round at an arbitrarily high number of points.



* Spanish TV contest ''Gafapastas'' is a real-life shining example of this. It has five rounds, the first four are worth 600 if you manage to do everything perfectly and the last one is ''1200'' for the same. Not only that, but while the first four are individual rounds (Meaning both players can get the 600), the last one is head-to-head answer-this-first squareoff, so a losing player can quickly CurbStompBattle their opponent and win by with a huge margin. The current champion has won many games simply because he's really good at the last round. The worst part? For a while, it was 800 for the first 4 rounds and 800 for the last. That's right, they changed it to make the rounds MORE unbalanced!

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* Spanish TV contest ''Gafapastas'' is a real-life shining example of this. It has five rounds, the first four are worth 600 if you manage to do everything perfectly and the last one is ''1200'' for the same. Not only that, but while the first four are individual rounds (Meaning both players can get the 600), the last one is head-to-head answer-this-first squareoff, so a losing player can quickly CurbStompBattle their opponent and win by with a huge margin. The current champion has won many games simply because he's really good at the last round. The worst part? For a while, it was 800 for the first 4 rounds and 800 for the last. That's right, they changed it to make the rounds MORE ''more'' unbalanced!



* Even though teams on ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' have their time disparities preserved across legs (if you checked in N minutes after the first team on the previous leg, you have to wait N minutes after the first team departs on the current leg before you can depart), the show will usually set up an equalizer near the start of every leg where all the contestants end up arriving at an airport several hours before the first flight, or (more uncommonly) at a task location hours before it opens. The vast majority of the time, this wipes out most if not all advantages and disadvantages between teams had from the previous leg[[note]]Exceptions do happen, albeit very rarely, such as Nick & Vicki in Season 18 - at over 6 hours behind the second-to-last team, they couldn't make it onto the same flight as the other teams, and ended up 9 hours behind by the time they arrived in South Korea[[/note]]. However, demonstrating that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]], the first season's lack of these equalizers led to two teams being over 12 hours ahead of the rest by the end of leg 9, making the game essentially {{Unwinnable}} for the rest and making most of the remainder a ForegoneConclusion.
** They also have none-announced "non-elimination" rounds, which, since the idea is to be the last team standing, makes the entire leg pointless. The first team may, or may not, win a prize but all teams continue to the next leg and the order in which they arrived really does nothing to alter the odds. They also have "Fast Forwards" which if completed first allow one team to skip over all other tasks. It has however happened a handful of times that the fast forward has been completed, but still didn't win the team first place, typically due to long commute times or getting lost.
* In ''Series/CanadasWorstDriver'', the Worst Driver trophy is generally given to the contestant who did the worst on the final challenge, regardless of how well (or badly) they did on the earlier challenges. The final challenge is driving on public roads, which is by far the most important test of the person's driving ability.



* The very last round of ''Seroes/TalkinBoutYourGeneration'' is always worth one point more than the difference between the losing time and the winning team, "which means that anyone can win!". Of course, ThePointsMeanNothing anyway; the only real stakes are bragging rights.
** Although subverted, though definitely not averted, in Episode 26 wherein it was worth ''one million points''. Which was still well and truly enough that anyone could win, but there was no "exactly" about it.
*** On at least one occasion, Shaun just admitted he didn't remember what the score was and set the final round at an arbitrarily high number of points.



* Even though teams on ''Series/TheAmazingRace'' have their time disparities preserved across legs (if you checked in N minutes after the first team on the previous leg, you have to wait N minutes after the first team departs on the current leg before you can depart), the show will usually set up an equalizer near the start of every leg where all the contestants end up arriving at an airport several hours before the first flight, or (more uncommonly) at a task location hours before it opens. The vast majority of the time, this wipes out most if not all advantages and disadvantages between teams had from the previous leg[[note]]Exceptions do happen, albeit very rarely, such as Nick & Vicki in Season 18 - at over 6 hours behind the second-to-last team, they couldn't make it onto the same flight as the other teams, and ended up 9 hours behind by the time they arrived in South Korea[[/note]]. However, demonstrating that [[TropesAreTools Tropes Are Not Bad]], the first season's lack of these equalizers led to two teams being over 12 hours ahead of the rest by the end of leg 9, making the game essentially {{Unwinnable}} for the rest and making most of the remainder a ForegoneConclusion.
** They also have none-announced "non-elimination" rounds, which, since the idea is to be the last team standing, makes the entire leg pointless. The first team may, or may not, win a prize but all teams continue to the next leg and the order in which they arrived really does nothing to alter the odds. They also have "Fast Forwards" which if completed first allow one team to skip over all other tasks. It has however happened a handful of times that the fast forward has been completed, but still didn't win the team first place, typically due to long commute times or getting lost.



* In ''Series/CanadasWorstDriver'', the Worst Driver trophy is generally given to the contestant who did the worst on the final challenge, regardless of how well (or badly) they did on the earlier challenges. The final challenge is driving on public roads, which is by far the most important test of the person's driving ability.
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