History Main / GoldenSnitch

12th Jan '18 7:46:31 PM donwarr1995
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* ''Series/TheGreatBritishBakeOff'': DefiedTrope -- at least in theory. The format is such that a disaster in one task need not prove fatal if the other two are done well. Paul and Mary have admitted that the showstopper is generally all that separates the contestants, though contestants in the bottom half of the technical challenge automatically become candidates for elimination. Proven most notably in series 3; Ryan came last in the technical challenge, only for his key lime pie showstopper to prove so amazingly excellent that he was named Star Baker that week, ahead of bakers who had consistently delivered in all three rounds.
12th Dec '17 9:57:08 AM thevisualboy37
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** 5 Star Spaces at once (Mario Party 5)--and unlike earlier games that could have multiple Star Spaces, all of them are real. If this happens, a player with a lot of coins could gain 2 or 3 Stars in a single turn, and still have enough for more Stars later.
24th Nov '17 11:18:14 AM nombretomado
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** There used to be a small number of FormulaOne races that could descend into slipstreaming duels. The most famous were the races at Monza before they slowed the circuit down with chicanes; particularly in 1971 where, after 300km of slipstreaming and overtaking, Peter Gethin went from 4th at the start of the final lap to win by a full 0.01 seconds.

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** There used to be a small number of FormulaOne UsefulNotes/FormulaOne races that could descend into slipstreaming duels. The most famous were the races at Monza before they slowed the circuit down with chicanes; particularly in 1971 where, after 300km of slipstreaming and overtaking, Peter Gethin went from 4th at the start of the final lap to win by a full 0.01 seconds.
20th Oct '17 4:18:39 AM Medinoc
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* The 1994 French game show ''Trésors du Monde'' pitted a single team against five challenges; the first four challenges set up the prize money, but the fifth challenge was the one that decided whether the team won or lost the prize.
18th Oct '17 3:07:17 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** Earlier, the [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame dwarven council]] is in a deadlock and you need to choose which dwarf you want to be king in order to get their support. You can spend the entire time supporting one of them, but whomever you choose at the final choice is the one that ends up being king. Even if you've been against them the entire time until that very moment.

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** Earlier, the [[OurDwarvesAreAllTheSame dwarven council]] is in a deadlock and you need to choose which dwarf you want to be king in order to get their support. You can spend the entire time supporting one of them, but whomever you choose at the final choice is the one that ends up being king. Even if you've been against them the entire time until that very moment. In that case you explicitly only get away with it because everybody but the candidates themselves is so sick of the situation that they would have agreed to a coin flip at that point.
18th Oct '17 7:50:34 AM Yoshiman400
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** Another example in golf has come around with the [=PGA=] Tour's [=FedEx=] Cup structure, a way of breaking the season down into an eight-month "regular season" (year-round save for a winter break starting with the 2013-14 wraparound season) and four-event "playoff" schedule. Thanks to the way the points are awarded in the playoffs events (quintuple their normal value) and (since 2009) reset after the third playoff event, every winner of the [=FedEx=] Cup since its inception in 2007 has either A) won the final playoffs event, or B) held the points lead entering the final event. (Tiger Woods covered both bases in 2007.)

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** Another example in golf has come around with the [=PGA=] Tour's [=FedEx=] Cup structure, a way of breaking the season down into an eight-month a "regular season" (year-round save for a winter break starting with the 2013-14 wraparound season) and four-event "playoff" schedule. Thanks to the way the points are awarded in the playoffs events (quintuple playoff tournaments (several times their normal value) and (since 2009) reset after the third playoff event, tournament since 2009, every winner of the [=FedEx=] Cup since its inception in 2007 has had either A) won the final playoffs event, or B) held the points lead entering the final event.event, until Justin Thomas in 2017 who overtook Jordan Spieth with a second place finish. (Tiger Woods covered both bases in 2007.)
9th Oct '17 4:52:11 PM KingLyger
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** Another example is the Triwizard Tournament which is the focal point of the fourth book. While each school representative competes in three challenges scattered throughout the school year victory is determined entirely by who reaches Triwizard Cup first in the final challenge. Performing well in the first two challenges will grant an advantage via a head start however giving those challenges some potential bearing on the outcome.

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** Another example is the Triwizard Tournament which is the focal point of the fourth book. While each school representative competes in three challenges scattered throughout the school year year, victory is determined entirely by who whoever first reaches the Triwizard Cup first in the final challenge. Performing well in the first two challenges will grant an advantage via a head start however start, giving those challenges some potential bearing on the outcome.outcome, but the audience never sees that advantage play out.
5th Oct '17 8:06:10 AM HumanTorch2
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* In the NASCAR Sprint Cup Chase championship format (starting in 2013), winning a single race in the 26 "regular season" races almost guarantees a place in the Chase (the playoffs) as typically multiple races are won by different drivers, usually ensuring there are never more than 16 different winners in a season, and as long as the driver is in the top 30 in points. In the Chase itself, winning a race in a round is an automatic pass to the next round, regardless of the driver's points standings in that round. In the final race of the year at Homestead, the Championship winner has to only place ahead of the remaining three Chase drivers at the end of the race. It is, therefore, theoretically possible for a driver to win a single race during the first 26 to make the Chase but be dead last (30th) in qualifying points, then win a single race in each of the three playoff rounds and not finish the other 6, and then, in the championship race, have the other three Chase drivers crash out on earlier laps, getting the final victory on points without even finishing ''that'' race either.
** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kyle Busch missed several races after suffering a [[{{GameBreakingInjury}} broken leg]] in the Xfinity Series opener at Daytona. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Busch came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions. He then managed to survive all the way to Homestead, and ended up winning the Championship by 3 seconds over defending champion Kevin Harvick.

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* In the NASCAR Sprint Cup Chase championship format (starting in 2013), 2014), winning a single race in the 26 "regular season" races almost guarantees a place in the Chase (the playoffs) as typically multiple races are won by different drivers, usually ensuring there are never more than 16 different winners in a season, and as long as the driver is in the top 30 in points. In the Chase itself, winning a race in a round is an automatic pass to the next round, regardless of the driver's points standings in that round. In the final race of the year at Homestead, the Championship winner has to only place ahead of the remaining three Chase drivers at the end of the race. It is, therefore, theoretically possible for a driver to win a single race during the first 26 to make the Chase but be dead last (30th) in qualifying points, then win a single race in each of the three playoff rounds and not finish the other 6, and then, in the championship race, have the other three Chase drivers crash out on earlier laps, getting the final victory on points without even finishing ''that'' race either.
** There is a rules patch in that you can't just win the first race of the season and then decide that since you're already in the playoffs, you don't need to race again until the first round of the Chase. Besides, the more races you win, the better your "seed" in the Chase. Also, you can't just show up for race 26, win that and qualify for the Chase, either. In 2015, Kyle Busch missed several races after suffering a [[{{GameBreakingInjury}} broken leg]] in the Xfinity Series opener at Daytona. NASCAR ruled that even if he won a race when he returned, he'd have to compete in a certain number of races and accumulate a certain number of points before qualifying for the Chase. Busch came back and won ''several'' races to qualify with ease despite the restrictions. He then managed to survive all the way to Homestead, Homestead on points alone (no small feat), and ended up winning the Championship by 3 seconds over defending champion Kevin Harvick.
27th Sep '17 9:37:56 AM Gosicrystal
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* Zig-zagged in Spin-Off in ''VideoGame/WiiParty''. When several x2 or x3 spaces are landed on without playing a mini-game, the bank will have an absurd amount of coins the player who wins the next game will usually get an incredible lead. That lead can easily be taken away in a duel mini-game though, where the challenger (who gets to choose their opponent) gets half the opponent's coins if they win. A win here will usually give the challenger a slight lead over their opponent and overall.

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* Zig-zagged in Spin-Off in ''VideoGame/WiiParty''. When several x2 or x3 spaces are landed on without playing a mini-game, the bank will have an absurd amount of coins coins, and the player who wins the next game will usually get an incredible lead. That lead can easily be taken away in a duel mini-game though, where the challenger (who gets to choose their opponent) gets half the opponent's coins if they win. A win here will usually give the challenger a slight lead over their opponent and overall.
22nd Sep '17 10:54:01 PM SMARTALIENQT
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* The legal profession has this UpToEleven: not only does law school follow the tradition of one final exam determining your entire grade, but, past law school, grades are utterly inconsequential compared to the ''real'' test: passing the bar exam. You need to get through law school in order to be allowed to take the bar (and grades are important for the first job or two post-graduation), but ultimately it doesn't matter how stellar your grades are: if you flunk the bar, you can't practice.
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