History Main / Glamour

7th Aug '16 12:11:05 PM nombretomado
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* This is Allure's power in ''ComicBook/RelativeHeroes'' in TheDCU.

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* This is Allure's power in ''ComicBook/RelativeHeroes'' in TheDCU.Franchise/TheDCU.
27th Jul '16 11:03:48 AM intastiel
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* This is how certain individuals who claim to be part-dragon justify the fact that no one else can see their supposed claws and scales. Insanity, perhaps, but a shared insanity if so--they even have Internet support groups! (They're generally classified as a particularly out-there branch of the Otherkin, themselves an out-there branch of the UsefulNotes/FurryFandom.)
20th Jul '16 7:54:00 AM IamTheCaligula
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* As mentioned above, TheFairFolk were the {{Trope Codifier}}s of this power. In fact, the very name "faeries" is derived from Latin's "fata", meaning "enchantment", and the various euphemistical ways of referring to them is tied to keeping up appearances: If the faeries discovered that their glamour wasn't as convincing or absolute as they thought it was, if you decided that you didn't think they actually were very fair once the effects of the glamour wore off, [[NeverMyFault it was entirely your fault]] for being living proof of the flaws and shortcomings of both them and their prized glamour, and so you'd need to be [[DispropotionateRetribution recitified]]... Yeah, better keep calling them "fair" even after the glamour has worn off.

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* As mentioned above, TheFairFolk were the {{Trope Codifier}}s of this power. In fact, the very name "faeries" is derived from Latin's "fata", meaning "enchantment", and the various euphemistical ways of referring to them is tied to keeping up appearances: If the faeries discovered that their glamour wasn't as convincing or absolute as they thought it was, if you decided that you didn't think they actually were very fair once the effects of the glamour wore off, [[NeverMyFault it was entirely your fault]] for being that you were living proof of the flaws and shortcomings of both them and their prized glamour, and so you'd need to be [[DispropotionateRetribution [[DisproportionateRetribution recitified]]... Yeah, better keep calling them "fair" even after the glamour has worn off.



** The Kitsune often disguised themselves as women who came across to those who saw them as supremely beautiful and nigh-omniscient. With this glamour, the Kitsune would often lure aristocrats with their wiles while they brought ruin upon the land around them. Only very powerful [[UsefulNotes/Onmyodo Onmyouji]] and/or Buddhist Monks could see through this glamour and realize who the true culprit was as well as her true nature. Dogs, however, were immune to the glamour and would instintively chase the Kitsune if it caught sight of her, and if the Kitsune passed between a lightsource and a shoji paper screen, [[TheShadowKnows her shadow on the opposite side of the screen]] [[GlamourFailure would reveal her true nature.]]
** Special mention goes to the youkai Nurarihyon, [[RubberForeheadAliens an old coot with a weirdly enlongated head]], who was said to enter people's houses, drink their tea, eat their food and generally act like he owned the place. While some stories state that he did this only while the owners were away, thus only fooling neighbours into thinking whoever lived in the house was actually at home, some other stories have it that he could do this while the owners were at home, too. Not only that, during his visit the owners of the house would think ''he'' was the master of their home, and not until he left on his own would anyone even think to ask the question "Who was that guy?"

to:

** The Kitsune often disguised themselves as women who came across to those who saw them as supremely beautiful and nigh-omniscient. With this glamour, the Kitsune would often lure aristocrats with their wiles while they brought ruin upon the land around them. Only very powerful [[UsefulNotes/Onmyodo [[UsefulNotes/{{Onmyodo}} Onmyouji]] and/or Buddhist Monks could see through this glamour and realize who the true culprit was as well as her true nature. Dogs, however, were immune to the glamour and would instintively chase the Kitsune if it caught sight of her, and if the Kitsune passed between a lightsource and a shoji paper screen, [[TheShadowKnows her shadow on the opposite side of the screen]] [[GlamourFailure would reveal her true nature.]]
** Special mention goes to the youkai Nurarihyon, [[RubberForeheadAliens an old coot with a weirdly enlongated head]], who was said to enter people's houses, drink their tea, eat their food and generally act like he owned the place. While some stories state that he did this only while the owners were away, thus only fooling neighbours into thinking whoever lived in the house was actually at owners were home, some other stories have it that he could do this while the owners occupants were at home, too. Not only that, during his visit the owners of the house would think ''he'' was the master of their home, and not until he left on his own would anyone even think to ask the question "Who was that guy?"
20th Jul '16 7:46:49 AM IamTheCaligula
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Folklore]]
* As mentioned above, TheFairFolk were the {{Trope Codifier}}s of this power. In fact, the very name "faeries" is derived from Latin's "fata", meaning "enchantment", and the various euphemistical ways of referring to them is tied to keeping up appearances: If the faeries discovered that their glamour wasn't as convincing or absolute as they thought it was, if you decided that you didn't think they actually were very fair once the effects of the glamour wore off, [[NeverMyFault it was entirely your fault]] for being living proof of the flaws and shortcomings of both them and their prized glamour, and so you'd need to be [[DispropotionateRetribution recitified]]... Yeah, better keep calling them "fair" even after the glamour has worn off.
* Not limited to western folklore and faeries, this trope was also common in regards to the Japanese {{youkai}}:
** The Kitsune often disguised themselves as women who came across to those who saw them as supremely beautiful and nigh-omniscient. With this glamour, the Kitsune would often lure aristocrats with their wiles while they brought ruin upon the land around them. Only very powerful [[UsefulNotes/Onmyodo Onmyouji]] and/or Buddhist Monks could see through this glamour and realize who the true culprit was as well as her true nature. Dogs, however, were immune to the glamour and would instintively chase the Kitsune if it caught sight of her, and if the Kitsune passed between a lightsource and a shoji paper screen, [[TheShadowKnows her shadow on the opposite side of the screen]] [[GlamourFailure would reveal her true nature.]]
** Special mention goes to the youkai Nurarihyon, [[RubberForeheadAliens an old coot with a weirdly enlongated head]], who was said to enter people's houses, drink their tea, eat their food and generally act like he owned the place. While some stories state that he did this only while the owners were away, thus only fooling neighbours into thinking whoever lived in the house was actually at home, some other stories have it that he could do this while the owners were at home, too. Not only that, during his visit the owners of the house would think ''he'' was the master of their home, and not until he left on his own would anyone even think to ask the question "Who was that guy?"
[[/folder]]
23rd Jun '16 1:00:52 PM captainpat
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** All the Time Lords in the novelisation of "Shada" are depicted using it on the humans to some extent -- it seems to manifest as inhuman beauty for the conventionally beautiful Time Lords (Romana) and impossible charm and likeability for less conventionally beautiful ones (the Doctor and Chronotis). Chris cannot stop staring at Romana, thinking over and over that she is the most beautiful woman he has ever seen, even though he notices that he doesn't find her sexually attractive and that he should find her a lot less alarming than the fact she has a RobotDog; and whenever Clare gets a scene with the Doctor she [[EatingTheEyeCandy describes his appearance over and over again in her internal monologue]], picking out mannerisms and features she finds irresistibly charming (like [[WhenSheSmiles his smile]], his voice, his CleopatraNose, and things like how he runs and the particular way he reads a book) and finding herself driven to [[TheoryOfNarrativeCausality fill the 'companion' role by instinct]], while at the same time well aware that she doesn't find him handsome and that it makes absolutely no sense for her to act that way or feel that way about him. Chronotis can get away with extreme rudeness, possible sinister intentions and the fact that he's been living at the university for centuries without visibly ageing by constantly projecting an air of harmlessness that makes everyone assume that he's such a nice person.

to:

** All the Time Lords in the novelisation of "Shada" are depicted using it on the humans to some extent -- it seems to manifest as inhuman beauty for the conventionally beautiful Time Lords (Romana) and impossible charm and likeability for less conventionally beautiful ones (the Doctor and Chronotis). Chris cannot stop staring at Romana, thinking over and over that she is the most beautiful woman he has ever seen, even though he notices that he doesn't find her sexually attractive and that he should find her a lot less alarming than the fact she has a RobotDog; and whenever Clare gets a scene with the Doctor she [[EatingTheEyeCandy describes his appearance over and over again in her internal monologue]], picking out mannerisms and features she finds irresistibly charming (like [[WhenSheSmiles his smile]], his voice, his CleopatraNose, nose, and things like how he runs and the particular way he reads a book) and finding herself driven to [[TheoryOfNarrativeCausality fill the 'companion' role by instinct]], while at the same time well aware that she doesn't find him handsome and that it makes absolutely no sense for her to act that way or feel that way about him. Chronotis can get away with extreme rudeness, possible sinister intentions and the fact that he's been living at the university for centuries without visibly ageing by constantly projecting an air of harmlessness that makes everyone assume that he's such a nice person.
11th Jun '16 3:52:27 PM nombretomado
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* In the SwordOfTruth books, Witch Women like Shota or Six do this unconsciously, and sometimes unintentionally, to those around them. It's considered rape by the Sisters of the Light if one uses this to seduce and have sex with a man, punishable by death or exile from the Palace of the Prophets (which is basically the same thing).

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* In the SwordOfTruth Literature/SwordOfTruth books, Witch Women like Shota or Six do this unconsciously, and sometimes unintentionally, to those around them. It's considered rape by the Sisters of the Light if one uses this to seduce and have sex with a man, punishable by death or exile from the Palace of the Prophets (which is basically the same thing).



* ''StarTrekNewFrontier'': The Selelvian race has a form of Glamour that's called "The Knack". They claim it only makes a person do what they really want to do, but it is eventually shown that they can make others do what ''they'' want them to do. It doesn't work on nonbiological beings, so Morgan (a hologram) and Data (an android) are able to bust them, leading to an off-pages war.

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* ''StarTrekNewFrontier'': ''Literature/StarTrekNewFrontier'': The Selelvian race has a form of Glamour that's called "The Knack". They claim it only makes a person do what they really want to do, but it is eventually shown that they can make others do what ''they'' want them to do. It doesn't work on nonbiological beings, so Morgan (a hologram) and Data (an android) are able to bust them, leading to an off-pages war.
20th May '16 2:02:55 PM Doug86
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* The Tzenkethi in the StarTrekNovelVerse are a mild example. Every non-Tzenkethi who sees one comments on their grace and ethereal beauty. They're frequently considered almost mesmerizing. The lower ranked Tzenkethi clearly experience a similar effect when in the presence of their betters.

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* The Tzenkethi in the StarTrekNovelVerse Franchise/StarTrekNovelVerse are a mild example. Every non-Tzenkethi who sees one comments on their grace and ethereal beauty. They're frequently considered almost mesmerizing. The lower ranked Tzenkethi clearly experience a similar effect when in the presence of their betters.
10th May '16 3:27:29 AM M84
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* Daemonettes from ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' and ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' use magic/Warp Energy to appear like something their targets would find most attractive, lulling them into helplessness before cutting them down.

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* Daemonettes from ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' and ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'' use magic/Warp Energy to appear like something their targets would find most attractive, lulling them into helplessness before cutting them down. The eldest Dark Eldar -- fitting, given their own twisted relationship with Slaanesh -- use their advanced technology to appear youthful and sexy. Psykers and daemons can see through their illusions, revealing the Dark Eldar for what they truly are: ancient decrepit monsters.
18th Apr '16 12:57:46 AM AnotherEpicFail
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** Meanwhile, the crossover game ''Midnight Circus'' features all the forms of Glamour featured in the Old World of Darkness, plus one unique to the [{CircusOfFear eponymous Circus]]: the Glamour Veil, a vast shroud of illusions and mental commands draped over the circus, preventing the customers from noticing anything suspicious about the place. This comes in particularly handy during [[MonsterClown Koba's Progressive Klown Show]], which usually ends with a traitor in the clown troupe being eaten alive by an enslaved werebear: not only does the Glamour Veil prevent the audience from realizing that someone has just been murdered on stage, but any rescue attempts by the player will be interpreted as AllPartOfTheShow - including the moment when Koba brings out a flamethrower and sets the stage on fire.

to:

** Meanwhile, the crossover game ''Midnight Circus'' features all the forms of Glamour featured in the Old World of Darkness, plus one unique to the [{CircusOfFear [[CircusOfFear eponymous Circus]]: the Glamour Veil, a vast shroud of illusions and mental commands draped over the circus, preventing the customers from noticing anything suspicious about the place. This comes in particularly handy during [[MonsterClown Koba's Progressive Klown Show]], which usually ends with a traitor in the clown troupe being eaten alive by an enslaved werebear: not only does the Glamour Veil prevent the audience from realizing that someone has just been murdered on stage, but any rescue attempts by the player will be interpreted as AllPartOfTheShow - including the moment when Koba brings out a flamethrower and sets the stage on fire.
18th Apr '16 12:57:16 AM AnotherEpicFail
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Added DiffLines:

** Meanwhile, the crossover game ''Midnight Circus'' features all the forms of Glamour featured in the Old World of Darkness, plus one unique to the [{CircusOfFear eponymous Circus]]: the Glamour Veil, a vast shroud of illusions and mental commands draped over the circus, preventing the customers from noticing anything suspicious about the place. This comes in particularly handy during [[MonsterClown Koba's Progressive Klown Show]], which usually ends with a traitor in the clown troupe being eaten alive by an enslaved werebear: not only does the Glamour Veil prevent the audience from realizing that someone has just been murdered on stage, but any rescue attempts by the player will be interpreted as AllPartOfTheShow - including the moment when Koba brings out a flamethrower and sets the stage on fire.
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