History Main / GiveMeYourInventoryItem

22nd Jul '16 9:03:49 AM Malady
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* ''VideoGame/AVeryLongRopeToTheTopOfTheSky'': Just once, when part of the ChainOfDeals in Silver Spring leads you to an NPC who only wants a potato...
25th Jun '16 9:08:13 PM nombretomado
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* In ''BaldursGate'', Branwen is a priestess turned to stone by an evil mage. You can buy a ''stone to flesh'' scroll from the douchebag who's exploiting her situation for 500 gold. Or, you can go to a temple, get a scroll directly from a priest, and use that instead (and unless you've been butchering innocents along the way, you'll probably be able to get it for less). Or or, you can knock said douchebag over the head, and take his scroll for nothing.
** Played with in the expansion to ''[=BG2=]'', where an innocent commoner is killed before the player's eyes by a stray shot in a besieged city. His young child begs the player for help: and the player has the option of refusing, or merely comforting him for his loss. If they have a rod of resurrection, however, they can choose to use one of its limited charges to restore the commoner, who thanks you profusely. This gets you a point of reputation, but by this point you're likely at the maximum of 20 anyway. Or you could just have the party cleric cast a prepared Raise Dead spell.

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* ''Franchise/BaldursGate''
**
In ''BaldursGate'', ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'', Branwen is a priestess turned to stone by an evil mage. You can buy a ''stone to flesh'' scroll from the douchebag who's exploiting her situation for 500 gold. Or, you can go to a temple, get a scroll directly from a priest, and use that instead (and unless you've been butchering innocents along the way, you'll probably be able to get it for less). Or or, you can knock said douchebag over the head, and take his scroll for nothing.
** Played with in the expansion to ''[=BG2=]'', ''VideoGame/BaldursGateII'', where an innocent commoner is killed before the player's eyes by a stray shot in a besieged city. His young child begs the player for help: and the player has the option of refusing, or merely comforting him for his loss. If they have a rod of resurrection, however, they can choose to use one of its limited charges to restore the commoner, who thanks you profusely. This gets you a point of reputation, but by this point you're likely at the maximum of 20 anyway. Or you could just have the party cleric cast a prepared Raise Dead spell.
13th Apr '16 10:21:25 PM dclark
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** ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' continues the grand tradition of two-bit thugs demanding money from unstoppable world-saving demigods. Hilariously, if you become leader of the Thieves' Guild, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny you can actually chastise them and take ''their'' money instead]]. More sympathetically, you will sometimes run across Stormcloaks taken prisoner by the Thalmor. Once you slaughter the Thalmor and free the prisoner ([[ScrewYouElves which you inevitably will]]) you can give the prisoner any items from your inventory. The guy probably won't survive long without some gear, but fortunately you've got 3-4 dead Thalmor you can strip for their gear.
11th Apr '16 3:39:52 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* In ''VideoGame/SwordOfVermilion'', at one point halfway through the game you run into a certain seemingly typical shopkeeper who sells three joke items, and upon attempting to purchase any of these, he claims you don't have enough money, takes all of it, and compensates himself for the rest by taking all of your swords, too; in order to not leave you entirely unarmed, he'll hand over a crappy early game sword, leaving you without money to easily replace it with. Close to endgame, your eventual reward for this stomach punch is the titular Sword of Vermillion, the most powerful sword in the game. It's also possible to avoid the shopkeeper entirely and prevent the loss of all your hard earned stuff, though you do miss out on the sword reward as a result. Besides, a decent amount of money can be spared by buying other expensive inventory items like Shields and Spellbooks, then reselling them afterward.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', wherein various highwaymen will demand that you give them some gold as a threat. Refuse, and they try to kill you. Hm... You ''do'' get some nifty gear from their corpses, though.
** The first expansion of ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' has Gaenor, who asks you for increasingly large sums of money (and/or rare items) until he refuses to believe that you'd actually have the cash/item and storms off even if you have the cash.
*** [[spoiler: He then shows up a few days later wearing a full set of one of the most powerful and rare armor sets in the game and tries to kill you - and is nearly invincible due to said armor and his cosmically high Luck score.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/SwordOfVermilion'', at one point halfway through the game you run into a certain seemingly typical shopkeeper who sells three joke items, and upon attempting to purchase any of these, he claims you don't have enough money, takes all of it, and compensates himself for the rest by taking all of your swords, too; in order to not leave you entirely unarmed, he'll hand over a crappy early game sword, leaving you without money to easily replace it with. The {{walkthrough}} that was packaged with the game tells you about all of this, except your ultimate reward, but strongly advises you not to skip over it and even recommends buying stuff you can sell immediately after the interaction so you won't lose as much money. Close to endgame, your eventual reward for this stomach punch is the titular Sword of Vermillion, the most powerful sword in the game. It's also possible to avoid the shopkeeper entirely and prevent the loss of all your hard earned stuff, though you do miss out on the sword reward as a result. Besides, a decent amount of money can be spared by buying other expensive inventory items like Shields and Spellbooks, then reselling them afterward.\n
* Averted in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'', wherein various ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion'': Various highwaymen will demand that you give them some gold as a threat. Refuse, and they try to kill you. Hm... You ''do'' get some nifty gear from their corpses, though.
** * The first expansion of ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' has Gaenor, who asks you for increasingly large sums of money (and/or rare items) until he refuses to believe that you'd actually have the cash/item and storms off even if you have the cash.
***
cash. [[spoiler: He then shows up a few days later wearing a full set of one of the most powerful and rare armor sets in the game and tries to kill you - and is nearly invincible due to said the armor and his cosmically high Luck score.]]
3rd Oct '15 7:28:50 PM nombretomado
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* In the original ''AnimalCrossing'', the residents of your town would occasionally force you to hand over one of the items in your inventory in exchange for something random, but generally of low value if you talked to them. The later games removed this, presumably due to how annoying it was to have to store all of your valuables before interacting with any townspeople.

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* In the original ''AnimalCrossing'', ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'', the residents of your town would occasionally force you to hand over one of the items in your inventory in exchange for something random, but generally of low value if you talked to them. The later games removed this, presumably due to how annoying it was to have to store all of your valuables before interacting with any townspeople.
2nd Aug '15 5:49:29 AM Finlay44
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* A tricky example in ''VideoGame/TheWitcher''. The player comes across a lady who needs a potion to ease her son's slow, painful death. However you cannot commonly buy such potions in this game, but you can ''make'' them. This requires meditating for a certain amount of time, but once you've done this there's a good chance that the woman will have disappeared, never to be seen again.

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* A tricky example in ''VideoGame/TheWitcher''. The ''VideoGame/TheWitcher'' is full of these, ranging from potions to simple food items to monster parts and beyond. Most come from seemingly generic [=NPCs=] and there's no guarantee you'll hear the same request twice, meaning that gathering most of these extra snippets and bonuses require [[GuideDangIt plenty of premeditation]]. For example, the player comes can come across a lady who needs a potion to ease her son's slow, painful death. However you cannot commonly buy such potions in this game, but you can ''make'' them. This requires meditating for a certain amount of time, but once you've done this there's a good chance that the woman will have disappeared, never to be seen again.


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Devourers could count too, since they're exclusive to Chapter IV, where the guy is not present, only to show up again in V. At least this time, you have bit of a hint because the quest remains open in your journal.
25th Jul '15 4:03:12 PM MrCairo
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** In ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2'', the other Organization members in the Gray Area sometimes ask you for a specific common panel. If you hand one over, they'll give you a different panel in exchange. Whether this is worthwhile varies, as the panels they give you are also common drops, and they never tell you what you're trading for beforehand.
12th Jun '15 11:58:03 AM Prfnoff
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* In ''VideoGame/LiveALive'', BonusBoss Amulucretia can't be fought without first giving him a Gold Topknot (which can be worn as headgear). He refuses to give it back after being defeated.
12th Jun '15 11:55:05 AM Prfnoff
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* Freeware game ''VideoGame/GodOfThunder'' had a few "give me something" characters as well. Sometimes you get a hint to continue the game, sometimes an item, but one simply says "Thanks" when you give 100 jewels.
* Subverted in ''{{The 7th Saga}}'': a girl asks for a topaz (you sell for money), in exchange for a secret. When you give her... she tells you she'll get married. And laughs at your face.
* ''[[ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura Arcanum: Of Steamworks and Magick Obscura]]'' does this a ''lot.'' It all starts when you walk into an antique shop in the first town and have to trade a camera (but you should find another solution, [[GuideDangIt as the camera has a much better use much later]]) for information, and doesn't ever let up - though admittedly, given the experience rewards, it can help a lot to do some [[FetchQuest tedious item-gathering]].
** Nearly everything in Arcanum is absolutely persistent, though; you just have to break out of the traditional RPG mindset to take advantage of this fact. The guy who wants your camera? You can give it to him and lose an opportunity later, or do the standard RPG quest to find the information you need to continue. Or you can give him the camera then pickpocket it back from him later. You can also let yourself into the back room of his store by either picking the lock or pickpocketing the key off him and finding the information you need in his records. (You can also help yourself to his store inventory in this room, which means you can steal all of his gold by ''stealing everything he has for sale, selling it to him, then walking into his back room to steal it back and sell it back to him again''.) These alternate solutions are facilitated by the fact that this particular NPC has really crap perception skills compared to most, ''especially'' other shopkeepers.

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* Freeware game ''VideoGame/GodOfThunder'' had a few "give me something" characters as well. Sometimes you get a hint to continue the game, sometimes an item, but one simply says "Thanks" when you give 100 jewels.
* Subverted in ''{{The 7th Saga}}'': ''VideoGame/The7thSaga'': a girl asks for a topaz (you sell for money), in exchange for a secret. When you give her... she tells you she'll get married. And laughs at your face.
* ''[[ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura Arcanum: Of Steamworks and Magick Obscura]]'' ''VideoGame/ArcanumOfSteamworksAndMagickObscura'' does this a ''lot.'' It all starts when you walk into an antique shop in the first town and have to trade a camera (but you should find another solution, [[GuideDangIt as the camera has a much better use much later]]) for information, and doesn't ever let up - though admittedly, given the experience rewards, it can help a lot to do some [[FetchQuest tedious item-gathering]]. \n** Nearly everything in Arcanum is absolutely persistent, though; you just have to break out of the traditional RPG mindset to take advantage of this fact. The guy who wants your camera? You can give it to him and lose an opportunity later, or do the standard RPG quest to find the information you need to continue. Or you can give him the camera then pickpocket it back from him later. You can also let yourself into the back room of his store by either picking the lock or pickpocketing the key off him and finding the information you need in his records. (You can also help yourself to his store inventory in this room, which means you can steal all of his gold by ''stealing everything he has for sale, selling it to him, then walking into his back room to steal it back and sell it back to him again''.) These alternate solutions are facilitated by the fact that this particular NPC has really crap perception skills compared to most, ''especially'' other shopkeepers.



* A tricky example in ''TheWitcher''. The player comes across a lady who needs a potion to ease her son's slow, painful death. However you cannot commonly buy such potions in this game, but you can ''make'' them. This requires meditating for a certain amount of time, but once you've done this there's a good chance that the woman will have disappeared, never to be seen again.

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* A tricky example in ''TheWitcher''.''VideoGame/TheWitcher''. The player comes across a lady who needs a potion to ease her son's slow, painful death. However you cannot commonly buy such potions in this game, but you can ''make'' them. This requires meditating for a certain amount of time, but once you've done this there's a good chance that the woman will have disappeared, never to be seen again.



* ''{{Okami}}'' does this once or twice (most of the time it's puzzle items) but as Ammy gets stronger with praise, it makes sense for her to give in to the demands of the little people.

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* ''{{Okami}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' does this once or twice (most of the time it's puzzle items) but as Ammy gets stronger with praise, it makes sense for her to give in to the demands of the little people.



* ''{{Kingdom of Loathing}}'' has an optional quest where you bring a guard a healing potion. Said healing potion is cheap, and the guard gives you the money for it. Indecently, he gives you the money first, bringing back the potion is optional.
** This also introduces the resident healer (Doc Galaktik) to new players who might not have thoroughly explored the town.
* ''AtlanticaOnline'' does this quite often, but in many (and sometimes unexpected) variations. In at least one case, you bring the item only to have the NPC respond he actually doesn't need it anymore, and gives it back to you and suggests using it for some ItemCrafting. In other cases, a quest may ask you to craft something, but you don't need to give it to the NPC as proof.

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* ''{{Kingdom of Loathing}}'' ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' has an optional quest where you bring a guard a healing potion. Said healing potion is cheap, and the guard gives you the money for it. Indecently, he gives you the money first, bringing back the potion is optional.
**
optional. This also introduces the resident healer (Doc Galaktik) to new players who might not have thoroughly explored the town.
* ''AtlanticaOnline'' ''VideoGame/AtlanticaOnline'' does this quite often, but in many (and sometimes unexpected) variations. In at least one case, you bring the item only to have the NPC respond he actually doesn't need it anymore, and gives it back to you and suggests using it for some ItemCrafting. In other cases, a quest may ask you to craft something, but you don't need to give it to the NPC as proof.



* While most WorldOfWarcraft quests require items that can only be obtained while the player has the quests, some require the players to provide actual inventory items they could otherwise use. Before each capital city had tabards, the main way to get reputation was to turn in large amounts of cloth. Learning how to smelt dark iron or become a Goblin Engineer will cost you regular goods. Some dailies require players to craft items (food or gems/jewelry) and turn them over, but generally compensate well enough even to justify buying ingredients if necessary.

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* While most WorldOfWarcraft ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' quests require items that can only be obtained while the player has the quests, some require the players to provide actual inventory items they could otherwise use. Before each capital city had tabards, the main way to get reputation was to turn in large amounts of cloth. Learning how to smelt dark iron or become a Goblin Engineer will cost you regular goods. Some dailies require players to craft items (food or gems/jewelry) and turn them over, but generally compensate well enough even to justify buying ingredients if necessary.



* In ''PerfectDark'', you must sacrifice one of your weapons in order to progress through the last level. Luckily, you won't need all of them to defeat the final boss.

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* In ''PerfectDark'', ''VideoGame/PerfectDark'', you must sacrifice one of your weapons in order to progress through the last level. Luckily, you won't need all of them to defeat the final boss.FinalBoss.



* ''Riven: The sequel to Myst'' opens with Atrus giving you a "trap book" and a journal. once you link to the eponymously named Age, though, a guard commands you to give him the trap book, over and over...in a language we don't know, and even in bad D'ni at one point. Eventually, he just steals it from you. After you get it back later, Gehn himself politely asks for it, which is at least a little nicer.

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* ''Riven: The sequel to Myst'' ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}'' opens with Atrus giving you a "trap book" and a journal. once you link to the eponymously named Age, though, a guard commands you to give him the trap book, over and over...in a language we don't know, and even in bad D'ni at one point. Eventually, he just steals it from you. After you get it back later, Gehn himself politely asks for it, which is at least a little nicer.
26th May '15 5:29:30 PM HyperKunoichi
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** Also from ''Zelda'', the well trading sequence in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' is based on useful inventory items instead of the usual event items. Tip: Don't go in there without bringing a blue potion and many seeds.

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** Also from ''Zelda'', the well trading sequence in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask Majora's Mask]]'' is based on useful inventory items instead of the usual event items. Tip: Don't go in there without bringing a blue potion and many seeds. Notably, in the 3DS remake, this section is made a lot easier to deal with; only one of each item is needed (as opposed to five or ten), and you can use a more easily-obtainable Red Potion in place of a Blue Potion.
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