History Main / GirlsNeedRoleModels

29th Jul '16 7:29:39 AM InfectedBlood
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* Shanti from ''Webcomic/TheGreenEyedSniper'' is a nurse who runs a hospital in enemy territory, as she hates her own country's politics of aggression. She is secretly an assassin, targeting only criminals that her government won't touch (such as corrupted politicians, war criminals, powerful pedophiles, and slavers).
14th Jul '16 3:25:39 PM Anddrix
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** Once the movie was actually released, Merida was notable for independence, resourcefulness, [[ActionGirl skill in combat (particularly with a bow)]], and being the first Disney princess whose movie doesn't even have a romantic subplot -- rather, it involves her efforts to ''avoid'' an ArrangedMarriage. Unfortunately, the fact that she antagonizes her mother and winds up threatening the entire kingdom in her attempt to avoid it made her the movie's BaseBreaker, with some viewers seeing her as a lovely role model and others seeing her as [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation unsympathetic, whiny, and selfish]]. In other words, exactly like the flawed teenage girl the original ''female'' director and writer had intended her to be. Moral: do not be a female character with flaws you need to overcome - you need to be all righteous ass-kicking, all the time or a you're a bad role model. It was in fact this very mindset that led to Brenda Chapman having her film taken from her out of concern that it wasn't "action-oriented", and thus it would fail to attract boys (who are still the favored demographic).

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** Once the movie was actually released, Merida was notable for independence, resourcefulness, [[ActionGirl skill in combat (particularly with a bow)]], and being the first Disney princess whose movie doesn't even have a romantic subplot -- rather, it involves her efforts to ''avoid'' an ArrangedMarriage. Unfortunately, the fact that she antagonizes her mother and winds up threatening the entire kingdom in her attempt to avoid it made her the movie's BaseBreaker, BaseBreakingCharacter, with some viewers seeing her as a lovely role model and others seeing her as [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation unsympathetic, whiny, and selfish]]. In other words, exactly like the flawed teenage girl the original ''female'' director and writer had intended her to be. Moral: do not be a female character with flaws you need to overcome - you need to be all righteous ass-kicking, all the time or a you're a bad role model. It was in fact this very mindset that led to Brenda Chapman having her film taken from her out of concern that it wasn't "action-oriented", and thus it would fail to attract boys (who are still the favored demographic).
8th Jul '16 11:48:06 AM thecarolinabull01
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** Despite having no problems showing her assets and being a heel for most of her career, Wrestling/TerriRunnels also turned down ''Playboy'' for a similar reason, though it was due to the effects it might have on her daughter.
4th Jun '16 11:21:14 AM MarkLungo
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*** A particularly clueless stab at feminism is "The Monster of Peladon", where Alpha Centauri is inexplicably [[CharacterDerailment derailed]] into a StrawMisogynist just so Sarah can argue with it, despite it never having had any problems with Jo. Sarah later gets to introduce the Queen of Peladon to 'women's lib', explaining it's "when women don't let men tell them what to do", and apparently ''the Queen who is in charge of the planet and has lots of obedient subjects'' had never thought about that concept before.
*** In "Robot", Sarah gets to handle a huge chunk of the plot on her own, as she was still a familiar character after the Doctor's regeneration. Tied into her feminism when she is allowed to put a nerd in his place for wanting her to dress the way he likes, instead of the [[FashionDissonance admittedly hideous outfit]] she was wearing.
*** "Pyramids of Mars": Due to a feminist [[WriterOnBoard Director On Board]] who was adamant that Sarah was not allowed to be silly, Sarah ends up doing some rather out-of-character things like [[ActionGirl being a crack shot]], a skill there is ''no way'' she could ever have learned. Creator/ElisabethSladen wanted to play the scene as being a lucky shot, but the director refused.

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*** A particularly clueless stab at feminism is "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E2TheCurseOfPeladon The Monster of Peladon", Peladon]]", where Alpha Centauri is inexplicably [[CharacterDerailment derailed]] into a StrawMisogynist just so Sarah can argue with it, despite it never having had any problems with Jo. Sarah later gets to introduce the Queen of Peladon to 'women's lib', explaining it's "when women don't let men tell them what to do", and apparently ''the Queen who is in charge of the planet and has lots of obedient subjects'' had never thought about that concept before.
*** In "Robot", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS12E1Robot Robot]]", Sarah gets to handle a huge chunk of the plot on her own, as she was still a familiar character after the Doctor's regeneration. Tied into her feminism when she is allowed to put a nerd in his place for wanting her to dress the way he likes, instead of the [[FashionDissonance admittedly hideous outfit]] she was wearing.
*** "Pyramids "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E3PyramidsOfMars Pyramids of Mars": Mars]]": Due to a feminist [[WriterOnBoard Director On Board]] who was adamant that Sarah was not allowed to be silly, Sarah ends up doing some rather out-of-character things like [[ActionGirl being a crack shot]], a skill there is ''no way'' she could ever have learned. Creator/ElisabethSladen wanted to play the scene as being a lucky shot, but the director refused.
4th Jun '16 9:17:40 AM pinkdalek
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*** In "Robot", Sarah gets to handle a huge chunk of the plot on her own, as she was still a familiar character after the Doctor's regeneration. Tied into her feminism when she is allowed to put a nerd in his place for wanting her to dress the way he likes, instead of the [[FashionDissonance admittedly hideous outfit]] she was wearing.
4th Jun '16 9:11:16 AM pinkdalek
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** This especially affected "Pyramids of Mars" - the story itself treats Sarah Jane very respectfully, but due to a feminist [[WriterOnBoard Director On Board]] who was adamant that Sarah was not allowed to be silly, Sarah ends up doing some rather out-of-character things like [[ActionGirl being a crack shot]], a skill there is ''no way'' she could ever have learned. Creator/ElisabethSladen wanted to play the scene as being a lucky shot, but the director refused.
** The following female companion, Leela, was similarly intended to be a role model for young girls. Producer at the time Philip Hinchcliffe had a little girl living next door who was a fan of the show, and was upset when he asked her which character she identified with the most and said "the Doctor" rather than "Sarah Jane". This led to Hinchcliffe conceiving of Leela as a strong and intelligent ActionGirl who came from a gender-equal society, could stand up for herself and was sometimes shown even to be as clever as the Doctor. Contemporary criticism focused on her {{Stripperific}} outfit and accused her of being shallow ParentService akin to ''Series/TopOfThePops'' dancers, as well as on how violent her character was - which goes to show the sexism of the day, as Leela had a lot more to her than that. (Later criticism tended to suggest that the PygmalionPlot, the Doctor constantly putting down her intelligence and a StrangledByTheRedString departure were probably not the best ways to write a feminist icon.)

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** This especially affected *** A particularly clueless stab at feminism is "The Monster of Peladon", where Alpha Centauri is inexplicably [[CharacterDerailment derailed]] into a StrawMisogynist just so Sarah can argue with it, despite it never having had any problems with Jo. Sarah later gets to introduce the Queen of Peladon to 'women's lib', explaining it's "when women don't let men tell them what to do", and apparently ''the Queen who is in charge of the planet and has lots of obedient subjects'' had never thought about that concept before.
***
"Pyramids of Mars" - the story itself treats Sarah Jane very respectfully, but due Mars": Due to a feminist [[WriterOnBoard Director On Board]] who was adamant that Sarah was not allowed to be silly, Sarah ends up doing some rather out-of-character things like [[ActionGirl being a crack shot]], a skill there is ''no way'' she could ever have learned. Creator/ElisabethSladen wanted to play the scene as being a lucky shot, but the director refused.
** The following female companion, Leela, was similarly intended to be a role model for young girls. Producer at the time Philip Hinchcliffe had a little girl living next door who was a fan of the show, and was upset when he asked her which character she identified with the most and said "the Doctor" rather than "Sarah Jane". This led to Hinchcliffe conceiving of Leela as a strong and intelligent ActionGirl who came from a gender-equal society, could stand up for herself and was sometimes shown even to be as clever as the Doctor. Contemporary criticism focused on her {{Stripperific}} outfit and accused her of being shallow ParentService akin to ''Series/TopOfThePops'' dancers, as well as on how violent her character was - which goes to show the sexism of the day, as Leela had a lot more to her than that. (Later criticism tended to suggest that the PygmalionPlot, the Doctor constantly putting down her intelligence and a StrangledByTheRedString departure were probably not the best ways to write a feminist icon.)) Leela also addressed the long-time ''Who'' problem of the female companions being the Doctor's subordinates for show structure reasons - though this was done by making her the Doctor's ''willing'' subordinate and student, rather than anything so wild as having them be equal.
30th May '16 4:55:00 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* TamoraPierce says that this is one of her primary reasons for writing. All of her protagonists are strong ActionGirl types in her ''Literature/TortallUniverse'', and she mercilessly defies the NotLikeOtherGirls trope by having, in her ''Literature/CircleOfMagic'' series, a seamstress as one of the main characters (among other deconstructions of the attitude). In- and out-of-universe, Kel in ''Literature/ProtectorOfTheSmall'' is a role model for being thoroughly BadassNormal, inspiring girls to think they can also do great things without gods or magic to help.

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* TamoraPierce Creator/TamoraPierce says that this is one of her primary reasons for writing. All of her protagonists are strong ActionGirl types in her ''Literature/TortallUniverse'', and she mercilessly defies the NotLikeOtherGirls trope by having, in her ''Literature/CircleOfMagic'' series, a seamstress as one of the main characters (among other deconstructions of the attitude). In- and out-of-universe, Kel in ''Literature/ProtectorOfTheSmall'' is a role model for being thoroughly BadassNormal, inspiring girls to think they can also do great things without gods or magic to help.
22nd Apr '16 8:45:34 AM Anddrix
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* A well-done aversion in ''Film/{{Divergent}}''. The protagonist Tris is an ActionGirl. But she still shows a lot of struggle early on, being unused to the Dauntless training. She has to properly buckle down and work hard to succeed. Even then, she's still prone to her own set of flaws and weaknesses. The films give her a few more Moments of Awesome that she didn't have in the books, but her CharacterDevelopment is still intact.
12th Apr '16 3:26:06 AM Anddrix
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* A well-done aversion in ''{{Literature/Divergent}}''. The protagonist Tris is an ActionGirl. But she still shows a lot of struggle early on, being unused to the Dauntless training. She has to properly buckle down and work hard to succeed. Even then, she's still prone to her own set of flaws and weaknesses. The films give her a few more Moments of Awesome that she didn't have in the books, but her CharacterDevelopment is still intact.

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* A well-done aversion in ''{{Literature/Divergent}}''.''Film/{{Divergent}}''. The protagonist Tris is an ActionGirl. But she still shows a lot of struggle early on, being unused to the Dauntless training. She has to properly buckle down and work hard to succeed. Even then, she's still prone to her own set of flaws and weaknesses. The films give her a few more Moments of Awesome that she didn't have in the books, but her CharacterDevelopment is still intact.
12th Apr '16 3:10:50 AM fearlessnikki
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** ''{{Disney/Pocahontas}}'' is not open to the idea of an ArrangedMarriage, teaches a GreenAesop to her love interest, and manages to stop an entire war just by appealing to her father as a daughter. She also [[spoiler: chooses to stay with her people rather than going to England to be with John Smith]].



* The film adaptations of ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' take Hermione's role as this UpToEleven, apparently pinning the hopes of an entire generation of girls on Hermione Granger (blame Creator/SteveKloves). In the films (especially as they go on), Hermione is never anything less than superbly confident, [[WomenAreWiser coolheaded]], and perfectly suited to face ''any'' challenge, to the point where all of her flaws vanish -- as if by magic!

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* The film adaptations of ''Franchise/HarryPotter'' take Hermione's role as tend to do this UpToEleven, apparently pinning with Hermione, although some of it is a little [[NeverLiveItDown overblown by the hopes of an entire generation of girls on fandom]]. One such moment is a scene from the first book, where the boys are trapped by Devil's Snare. In the book, Hermione Granger (blame Creator/SteveKloves). freaks out and Ron has to yell some sense into her. In the films (especially film instead it's Ron who freaks out, and Hermione stays calm.[[note]]This is mostly due to compressing the amount of challenges the children face guarding the Philosopher's Stone. In the book, there are five. But the movie cuts it down to three. The remaining two challenges are reworked to give the other two a moment to shine as they go on), well - Harry using his flying skills to get the key, and Ron winning the chess game. With the logic puzzle in the book left out, this would have left Hermione without much. It's also worth noting that the movie does leave in Hermione nearly freaking out after Ron is hurt, and Harry has to stop her from ruining their chances.[[/note]]. The third film is notable in that Hermione is never anything less than superbly confident, [[WomenAreWiser coolheaded]], and perfectly suited given a few more action scenes she didn't have in the book. But this is lessened from the fifth film onwards; when the children are held captive by the Death Eaters, Ron struggles against his while Hermione does nothing. In the final films, Hermione is still prone to face ''any'' challenge, making mistakes along with the other two.
* A well-done aversion in ''{{Literature/Divergent}}''. The protagonist Tris is an ActionGirl. But she still shows a lot of struggle early on, being unused
to the point where all of Dauntless training. She has to properly buckle down and work hard to succeed. Even then, she's still prone to her own set of flaws vanish -- as if by magic! and weaknesses. The films give her a few more Moments of Awesome that she didn't have in the books, but her CharacterDevelopment is still intact.
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