History Main / GetTheeToANunnery

13th May '17 3:11:45 AM Shaid
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** Yet another meaning to it: "Tail" was also a euphemism for vagina (yes, apparently the term is really [[OlderThanTheyThink that old]]). It's a joke about cunnilingus!
30th Apr '17 4:24:12 PM DPsycho
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** Ezekiel 16:25, Ezekiel compares Jerusalem with a prostitute who spreads eagle to every man who walks by: ''"thou hast opened thy feet to every one that ped by, and multiplied thy whoredoms."'' In Biblical Hebrew, the same word is used for "feet" and "legs". That pretty much preserves the euphemism in modern language! Among popular Protestant translations, the NASB renders this "spread your legs," while the NIV and RSV have "offering your body" and "yourself," respectively. The Catholic NAB has "spreading your legs," and the Jerusalem Bible has "give your body" "to every [[HaveAGayOldTime comer]]."

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** Ezekiel 16:25, Ezekiel compares Jerusalem with to a prostitute who spreads eagle to every man who walks by: ''"thou hast opened thy feet to every one that ped by, and multiplied thy whoredoms."'' In Biblical Hebrew, the same word is used for "feet" and "legs". That pretty much preserves the euphemism in modern language! Among popular Protestant translations, the NASB renders this "spread your legs," while the NIV and RSV have "offering your body" and "yourself," respectively. The Catholic NAB has "spreading your legs," and the Jerusalem Bible has "give your body" "to every [[HaveAGayOldTime comer]]."
17th Jan '17 10:28:17 PM BobbyZ4
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* One example of a word losing its dirtier meaning over time is the title of Shakespeare's play ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing.'' In Shakespeare's time, "thing" being a euphemism for a man's primary naughty bit, "nothing" or "no-thing" was also a euphemism for a woman's naughty bits. This gave the title three different yet equally appropriate meanings, as the main conflict over the play revolves around the false implication of Hero losing her virginity to another man while engaged to Claudio. Therefore it is "Much Ado about Nothing" as nothing was really going on, "Much Ado about Noting" as it's concerned with the views the characters have of each others' moral fiber (how they "note" each other), and "Much Ado about Nothing" as it was concerned with Hero's own naughty bits/her virginity. Sadly this clever wordplay is lost on many modern readers and the first interpretation is all they are aware of, especially in this modern time where a woman losing her virginity before marriage is all too common and not a reason to prevent a wedding.

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* One example of a word losing its dirtier meaning over time is the title of Shakespeare's play ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing.'' In Shakespeare's time, "thing" being a euphemism for a man's primary naughty bit, "nothing" or "no-thing" was also a euphemism for a woman's naughty bits. This gave the title three different yet equally appropriate meanings, as the main conflict over the play revolves around the false implication of Hero losing her virginity to another man while engaged to Claudio. Therefore it is "Much Ado about Nothing" as nothing was really going on, "Much Ado about Noting" as it's concerned with the views the characters have of each others' moral fiber (how they "note" each other), and "Much Ado about Nothing" as it was concerned with Hero's own naughty bits/her virginity. Sadly this clever wordplay is lost on many modern readers and the first interpretation is all they are aware of, especially in this modern time where a woman losing her virginity before marriage is all too common and not a reason to prevent a wedding.of.
6th Jan '17 6:13:22 AM SeptimusHeap
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** This also puts the Wiki/TVTropes phrase "Administrivia/GetKnown" in [[FreudWasRight a whole new light...]]

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** This also puts the Wiki/TVTropes phrase "Administrivia/GetKnown" in [[FreudWasRight a whole new light...]]
9th Dec '16 12:53:08 AM Mhazard
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** This also puts the Wiki/TVTropes phrase "Administrivia/GetKnown" in [[PrecisionFStrike a whole new light...]]

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** This also puts the Wiki/TVTropes phrase "Administrivia/GetKnown" in [[PrecisionFStrike [[FreudWasRight a whole new light...]]
4th Dec '16 3:35:31 PM MitchellProductions
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''Nunnery'' meant a convent for nuns but was also used as an UnusualEuphemism for brothel.[[note]]Because a common occurrence in Shakespeare's time and earlier was that, often, a nunnery convent ''would'' be pretty much a brothel in disguise, usually with the ''monks and priests'' taking sexual advantage of the women there.[[/note]] [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Now you know]]. For situations about women actually entering a convent, see TakingTheVeil and/or LockedAwayInAMonastery.

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''Nunnery'' meant a convent for nuns but was also used as an UnusualEuphemism for brothel.[[note]]Because a common occurrence in Shakespeare's time and earlier was that, often, a nunnery convent ''would'' be pretty much a brothel in disguise, usually with the ''monks and priests'' taking sexual advantage of the women there.[[/note]] [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Now you know]]. For situations about women actually entering a convent, see TakingTheVeil and/or LockedAwayInAMonastery. Contrast HaveAGayOldTime.
21st Nov '16 9:16:24 AM LordOfTheSword
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* The line from Mercutio "O Romeo, that she were! Oh, that she were/An open arse, and thou a poperin pear". The "open arse" is a reference to the medlar fruit, but there is no such thing as a "poperin pear". Separate the syllables, though, and you get "pop 'er in", which means these lines are about... things to do with a lady's rear end.

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* ** The line from Mercutio "O Romeo, that she were! Oh, that she were/An open arse, and thou a poperin pear". The "open arse" is a reference to the medlar fruit, but there is no such thing as a "poperin pear". Separate the syllables, though, and you get "pop 'er in", which means these lines are about... things to do with a lady's rear end.
21st Nov '16 9:16:07 AM LordOfTheSword
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* The line from Mercutio "O Romeo, that she were! Oh, that she were/An open arse, and thou a poperin pear". The "open arse" is a reference to the medlar fruit, but there is no such thing as a "poperin pear". Separate the syllables, though, and you get "pop 'er in", which means these lines are about... things to do with a lady's rear end.
6th Nov '16 3:50:05 PM skadooshbag
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Creator/{{Shakespeare}} is probably the most common exemplar of this trope, both because he wrote [[TheRenaissance a long time ago]] and because he had a [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar filthy streak]] wider than the [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen's]] farthingale. There was also no such thing as a "sensitive" listener who could not stand to hear a dirty joke in his day (except the Puritans, but they considered theatre itself to be sinful, so Shakespeare never seemed to keep their tastes in mind). The Queen's (and later King's) censors cared more about sedition and blasphemy than about sexual or scatological humor. This is how the [[IncrediblyLamePun awful puns]] in ''Henry V'' were allowed to be used while seemingly mild oaths like "Gadzooks" (God's hooks, or the nails that held Jesus to the cross) were banned.

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Creator/{{Shakespeare}} is probably the most common exemplar of this trope, both because he wrote [[TheRenaissance a long time ago]] and because he had a [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar filthy streak]] wider than the [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen's]] farthingale.farthingale (at least by the standards of the time). There was also no such thing as a "sensitive" listener who could not stand to hear a dirty joke in his day (except the Puritans, but they considered theatre itself to be sinful, so Shakespeare never seemed to keep their tastes in mind). The Queen's (and later King's) censors cared more about sedition and blasphemy than about sexual or scatological humor. This is how the [[IncrediblyLamePun awful puns]] in ''Henry V'' were allowed to be used while seemingly mild oaths like "Gadzooks" (God's hooks, or the nails that held Jesus to the cross) were banned.
31st Oct '16 1:51:32 PM gaimanite.pkat
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** This gives bonus meaning to the perpetually horny character of That70sShow's nickname: "Fez".
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