History Main / GetTheeToANunnery

21st Nov '16 9:16:24 AM LordOfTheSword
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* The line from Mercutio "O Romeo, that she were! Oh, that she were/An open arse, and thou a poperin pear". The "open arse" is a reference to the medlar fruit, but there is no such thing as a "poperin pear". Separate the syllables, though, and you get "pop 'er in", which means these lines are about... things to do with a lady's rear end.

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* ** The line from Mercutio "O Romeo, that she were! Oh, that she were/An open arse, and thou a poperin pear". The "open arse" is a reference to the medlar fruit, but there is no such thing as a "poperin pear". Separate the syllables, though, and you get "pop 'er in", which means these lines are about... things to do with a lady's rear end.
21st Nov '16 9:16:07 AM LordOfTheSword
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* The line from Mercutio "O Romeo, that she were! Oh, that she were/An open arse, and thou a poperin pear". The "open arse" is a reference to the medlar fruit, but there is no such thing as a "poperin pear". Separate the syllables, though, and you get "pop 'er in", which means these lines are about... things to do with a lady's rear end.
6th Nov '16 3:50:05 PM skadooshbag
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Creator/{{Shakespeare}} is probably the most common exemplar of this trope, both because he wrote [[TheRenaissance a long time ago]] and because he had a [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar filthy streak]] wider than the [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen's]] farthingale. There was also no such thing as a "sensitive" listener who could not stand to hear a dirty joke in his day (except the Puritans, but they considered theatre itself to be sinful, so Shakespeare never seemed to keep their tastes in mind). The Queen's (and later King's) censors cared more about sedition and blasphemy than about sexual or scatological humor. This is how the [[IncrediblyLamePun awful puns]] in ''Henry V'' were allowed to be used while seemingly mild oaths like "Gadzooks" (God's hooks, or the nails that held Jesus to the cross) were banned.

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Creator/{{Shakespeare}} is probably the most common exemplar of this trope, both because he wrote [[TheRenaissance a long time ago]] and because he had a [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar filthy streak]] wider than the [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen's]] farthingale.farthingale (at least by the standards of the time). There was also no such thing as a "sensitive" listener who could not stand to hear a dirty joke in his day (except the Puritans, but they considered theatre itself to be sinful, so Shakespeare never seemed to keep their tastes in mind). The Queen's (and later King's) censors cared more about sedition and blasphemy than about sexual or scatological humor. This is how the [[IncrediblyLamePun awful puns]] in ''Henry V'' were allowed to be used while seemingly mild oaths like "Gadzooks" (God's hooks, or the nails that held Jesus to the cross) were banned.
31st Oct '16 1:51:32 PM gaimanite.pkat
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** This gives bonus meaning to the perpetually horny character of That70sShow's nickname: "Fez".
30th Oct '16 8:49:07 PM TropesForever
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** This also puts the Wiki/TVTropes phrase "Administrivia/GetKnown" in [[PrecisionFStrike a whole new light...]]
26th Oct '16 1:26:11 PM Morgenthaler
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** "Horns" shows up in this sense in George Martin's ''ASongOfIceAndFire''.

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** "Horns" shows up in this sense in George Martin's ''ASongOfIceAndFire''.''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''.
25th Sep '16 7:55:50 AM Eievie
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* In ''Theatre/AsYouLikeIt'', the clown Touchstone gives a speech which is mostly funny because Shakespeare expects "hour" and "whore" to be homophones. This is one of many small things put forward as evidence for the idea that Shakespeare's dialect of Early Modern English most closely resembled the [[OopNorth northern]] dialects of Modern English (in which "hour" and "whore" still aren't homophones, but are closer to being so than in [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] English) -- doubtless quite a shock for generations of RP-speaking Shakespearean actors. Probably the best modern guess at what Shakespeare's dialect sounded like can be found [[http://www.pronouncingshakespeare.com/op-recordings/ here]].
* In ''Theatre/KingLear'' Edmund's line "Yours in the ranks of death!" is actually a Elizabethan era euphemism or pun for an orgasm or sex in general. "Die" was a common English euphemism for "orgasm" well into the 18th century, probably stemming from the French euphemism ''la petite mort'', "the little death." Shakespeare loved the phrase "I die in your lap" - he uses it in ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and in ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'', where Benedick tells Beatrice he "will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thy sight." Also in the same play, Benedick says he was told Beatrice was "sick for him" (i.e. in love with him), leading Beatrice to reply that ''she'' was told Benedick was "well nigh dead for her."

to:

* In ''Theatre/AsYouLikeIt'', the clown Touchstone gives a speech which is mostly funny because Shakespeare expects "hour" and "whore" to be homophones. This is one of many small things put forward as evidence for the idea that Shakespeare's dialect of Early Modern English most closely resembled the [[OopNorth northern]] dialects of Modern English (in which "hour" and "whore" still aren't homophones, but are closer to being so than in [[Creator/TheBBC BBC]] English) -- doubtless English)--doubtless quite a shock for generations of RP-speaking Shakespearean actors. Probably the best modern guess at what Shakespeare's dialect sounded like can be found [[http://www.pronouncingshakespeare.com/op-recordings/ here]].
* In ''Theatre/KingLear'' Edmund's line "Yours in the ranks of death!" is actually a Elizabethan era euphemism or pun for an orgasm or sex in general. "Die" was a common English euphemism for "orgasm" well into the 18th century, probably stemming from the French euphemism ''la petite mort'', "the little death." Shakespeare loved the phrase "I die in your lap" - he lap"--he uses it in ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' and in ''Theatre/MuchAdoAboutNothing'', where Benedick tells Beatrice he "will live in thy heart, die in thy lap, and be buried in thy sight." Also in the same play, Benedick says he was told Beatrice was "sick for him" (i.e. in love with him), leading Beatrice to reply that ''she'' was told Benedick was "well nigh dead for her."



-->'''Rosalind:''' Are you not good?\\
'''Orlando:''' I hope so.\\
'''Rosalind:''' Why then, can one desire too much of a good thing?

to:

-->'''Rosalind:''' -->'''Rosalind''': Are you not good?\\
'''Orlando:''' '''Orlando''': I hope so.\\
'''Rosalind:''' '''Rosalind''': Why then, can one desire too much of a good thing?



-->And for a woman wert thou first created,
-->Till Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting,
-->And by addition me of thee defeated,
-->By adding one thing to my purpose nothing.
*** In other words, "You were originally supposed to be a woman, but Mother Nature fell in love with you and defeated me by giving you a penis, [which doesn't help me at all/where you should have had a vagina]." [[BiTheWay Not that that probably stopped him]].

to:

-->And -->''And for a woman wert thou first created,
-->Till
created,\\
Till
Nature, as she wrought thee, fell a-doting,
-->And
a-doting,\\
And
by addition me of thee defeated,
-->By
defeated,\\
By
adding one thing to my purpose nothing.
nothing.''
*** In other words, "You were originally supposed to be a woman, but Mother Nature fell in love with you and defeated me by giving you a penis, [which doesn't help me at all/where you should have had a vagina]." [[BiTheWay Not that that probably stopped him]].him.]]



'''Benedick''': It is in my scabbard. [[CoitusInterruptus Shall I draw it?]] [Here referring to wit as a slang term for fencing skill]\\

to:

'''Benedick''': It is in my scabbard. [[CoitusInterruptus Shall I draw it?]] [Here ''[Here referring to wit as a slang term for fencing skill]\\skill]''\\



* Similarly, whenever the word "quaint" occurs in Creator/WilliamShakespeare or [[Creator/GeoffreyChaucer Chaucer]]... it means the same as "nothing", or "wit", or "ring." Terry Pratchett was right.
** Believe it or not, the word "quaint" has [[CountryMatters quite a filthy etymological history.]]

to:

* Similarly, whenever the word "quaint" occurs in Creator/WilliamShakespeare or [[Creator/GeoffreyChaucer Chaucer]]... Chaucer]]… it means the same as "nothing", or "wit", or "ring." Terry Pratchett was right.
** Believe it or not, the word "quaint" has [[CountryMatters quite a filthy etymological history.]]history]].



* The title quote -- at the time ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' was written, "nunnery" was a euphemism for "brothel".

to:

* The title quote -- at quote--at the time ''Theatre/{{Hamlet}}'' was written, "nunnery" was a euphemism for "brothel".



--->'''Scholar''': "It's all in my new book on Shakespeare, entitled 'I Love My Willy" - Which I'd like to whip out for you right now.

to:

--->'''Scholar''': "It's It's all in my new book on Shakespeare, entitled 'I ''I Love My Willy" - Which Willy''--Which I'd like to whip out for you right now.



-->'''Katherine:''' ... ''Coment appelle vous les pied et de roba?''
-->'''Alice: ''' ''Le ''Foot'', Madame, et le ''Count.
-->'''Katherine:'''. ''Le ''Foot'', et le ''Count''! O Seignieur Dieu, il sont le mots de son mauvais corruptible, grosse, et impudique, et non pour le dames de honeur d'user: je ne voudray pronouncer ce mots devant le seigneurs de France, pour toute le monde! Fo! Le ''Foot'' et le ''Count!
-->Or in translation from Shakespeare's [[BlindIdiotTranslation mangled]] Elizabethan French:
-->'''Katherine:''' ... ''How do you say, ''le pied'' and ''la robe''?''
-->'''Alice: ''' ''The ''Foot'', my lady, and the ''Gown.
-->'''Katherine:'''. ''The ''Foot'' and the ''Gown''! O Lord God, these are words of a wicked, corruptible, gross, and immodest sound, and not for ladies of honour to use! I should not want to pronounce these words before the lords of France for all the world! Fie! The ''Foot'' and the ''Gown!
-->The wordplay is on the French words ''foutre'' ("fuck" or "jizz") and ''con'' ("[[CountryMatters cunt]]").

to:

-->'''Katherine:''' ... ''Coment -->'''Katherine:''' …''Coment appelle vous les pied et de roba?''
-->'''Alice:
roba?''\\
'''Alice:
''' ''Le ''Foot'', Madame, et le ''Count.
-->'''Katherine:'''.
''Count.\\
'''Katherine:'''.
''Le ''Foot'', et le ''Count''! O Seignieur Dieu, il sont le mots de son mauvais corruptible, grosse, et impudique, et non pour le dames de honeur d'user: je ne voudray pronouncer ce mots devant le seigneurs de France, pour toute le monde! Fo! Le ''Foot'' et le ''Count!
-->Or **Or in translation from Shakespeare's [[BlindIdiotTranslation mangled]] Elizabethan French:
-->'''Katherine:''' ... ''How do you say, ''le pied'' and ''la robe''?''
-->'''Alice:
robe''?''\\
'''Alice:
''' ''The ''Foot'', my lady, and the ''Gown.
-->'''Katherine:'''.
''Gown.\\
'''Katherine:'''.
''The ''Foot'' and the ''Gown''! O Lord God, these are words of a wicked, corruptible, gross, and immodest sound, and not for ladies of honour to use! I should not want to pronounce these words before the lords of France for all the world! Fie! The ''Foot'' and the ''Gown!
-->The **The wordplay is on the French words ''foutre'' ("fuck" or "jizz") and ''con'' ("[[CountryMatters cunt]]").



** Similarly, in the same scene he mentions he would "take to the wall any Man or Maid of Montague". "Take to the wall" is a reference to the fact in fancy Italian cities of the time (such as Verona) families would have their toilets on the second floor of their homes, set up in such a way that their contents would dump down and drain into a trench in the center of the street. In essence, the Capulet man is saying he'd want to [[ToiletHumor shove the Montagues under a toilet and give them an excrement shower]] - or doing [[WallBangHer something different]] with the maidens.

to:

** Similarly, in the same scene he mentions he would "take to the wall any Man or Maid of Montague". "Take to the wall" is a reference to the fact in fancy Italian cities of the time (such as Verona) families would have their toilets on the second floor of their homes, set up in such a way that their contents would dump down and drain into a trench in the center of the street. In essence, the Capulet man is saying he'd want to [[ToiletHumor shove the Montagues under a toilet and give them an excrement shower]] - or shower]]--or doing [[WallBangHer something different]] with the maidens.






* In Literature/TheBible, the phrase "And Adam knew his wife" sounds innocent enough, until you learn that in Hebrew, there are two words for "know": one applies to people, and the other applies to inanimate objects. If you use the second to apply to a person, it becomes a euphemism for sex. [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle And now]] [[InnocentInnuendo you know]]. To be fair, the meaning is rather obvious -- the next few words are, "and she conceived a son". This one seems to have come full circle, as "knew her in the Biblical sense" has entered the popular lexicon. Still, some translations render such pages into the contemporary English phrases for clarity. This is also the basis of the legal term "carnal knowledge".

to:

* In Literature/TheBible, the phrase "And Adam knew his wife" sounds innocent enough, until you learn that in Hebrew, there are two words for "know": one applies to people, and the other applies to inanimate objects. If you use the second to apply to a person, it becomes a euphemism for sex. [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle And now]] [[InnocentInnuendo you know]]. To be fair, the meaning is rather obvious -- the obvious--the next few words are, "and she conceived a son". This one seems to have come full circle, as "knew her in the Biblical sense" has entered the popular lexicon. Still, some translations render such pages into the contemporary English phrases for clarity. This is also the basis of the legal term "carnal knowledge".



--->'''John Proctor''': I have...''known''...Abigail Williams.

to:

--->'''John Proctor''': I have...''known''...have… ''known''… Abigail Williams.



--->'''Will Turner:''' You know me?\\
'''Tia Dalma:''' You want to know me.\\
'''Jack Sparrow:''' There'll be no knowing here!\\
''-then-''\\
'''Jack Sparrow:''' I thought '''I''' knew you.\\
'''Tia Dalma:''' [[TakeThat Not so well as I had hoped]].

to:

--->'''Will Turner:''' Turner''': You know me?\\
'''Tia Dalma:''' Dalma''': You want to know me.\\
'''Jack Sparrow:''' Sparrow''': There'll be no knowing here!\\
''-then-''\\
''[then]''\\
'''Jack Sparrow:''' Sparrow''': I thought '''I''' knew you.\\
'''Tia Dalma:''' Dalma''': [[TakeThat Not so well as I had hoped]].hoped.]]



--> '''Angry Mob:''' '''''Lot''''' - where are the men who came to see you tonight? Send them out so that we may know them (sexually).

to:

--> '''Angry Mob:''' '''''Lot''''' - where Mob''': '''''Lot'''''--where are the men who came to see you tonight? Send them out so that we may know them (sexually).''[sexually]''.



*** Never mind that Sodom's crimes were a) [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]], not sex, and b) violating [[SacredHospitality the laws of hospitality]], per Ezekiel 16:49 and several other places....

to:

*** Never mind that Sodom's crimes were a) [[RapeIsASpecialKindOfEvil rape]], not sex, and b) violating [[SacredHospitality the laws of hospitality]], per Ezekiel 16:49 and several other places....places…



--->'''Hamlet holding a skull: '''Alas, poor Yorick... I knew him, Horatio.

to:

--->'''Hamlet holding a skull: '''Alas, skull''': Alas, poor Yorick... Yorick… I knew him, Horatio.



** Ezekiel 16:25, Ezekiel compares Jerusalem with a prostitute who spreads eagle to every man who walks by: ''"thou hast opened thy feet to every one that ped by, and multiplied thy whoredoms."'' In Biblical Hebrew, the same word is used for "feet" and "legs". That pretty much preserves the euphemism in modern language! Among popular Protestant translations, the NASB renders this "spread your legs," while the NIV and RSV have "offering your body" and "yourself," respectively. The Catholic NAB has "spreading your legs," and the Jerusalem Bible has "give your body" . . . "to every [[HaveAGayOldTime comer]]."
** Some Biblical pages have been sanitized for our protection by translators. One example is in 1 Samuel 20:41: the King James version is (greeting Jonathan) "David arose out of the place...and fell on his face to the ground, and bowed himself three times; and they kissed one another, and wept one with another, until David exceeded.". Conservative Christian commentators claim that "exceeded" means that he became overly emotional, but at least [[http://www.examiner.com/x-689-Spiritual-Life-Examiner~y2009m2d5-Sorry-rightwingers-but-King-David-was-gay one rabbi]] has claimed that in the original Hebrew, the last two words are really "David enlarged" - in other words, "[[SomethingElseAlsoRises David had an erection]]".

to:

** Ezekiel 16:25, Ezekiel compares Jerusalem with a prostitute who spreads eagle to every man who walks by: ''"thou hast opened thy feet to every one that ped by, and multiplied thy whoredoms."'' In Biblical Hebrew, the same word is used for "feet" and "legs". That pretty much preserves the euphemism in modern language! Among popular Protestant translations, the NASB renders this "spread your legs," while the NIV and RSV have "offering your body" and "yourself," respectively. The Catholic NAB has "spreading your legs," and the Jerusalem Bible has "give your body" . . . body"… "to every [[HaveAGayOldTime comer]]."
** Some Biblical pages have been sanitized for our protection by translators. One example is in 1 Samuel 20:41: the King James version is (greeting Jonathan) "David arose out of the place...place… and fell on his face to the ground, and bowed himself three times; and they kissed one another, and wept one with another, until David exceeded.". " Conservative Christian commentators claim that "exceeded" means that he became overly emotional, but at least [[http://www.examiner.com/x-689-Spiritual-Life-Examiner~y2009m2d5-Sorry-rightwingers-but-King-David-was-gay one rabbi]] has claimed that in the original Hebrew, the last two words are really "David enlarged" - in enlarged"--in other words, "[[SomethingElseAlsoRises David had an erection]]".



** "I sat down in his shadow [i.e., sat down while he was standing up]...and his fruit was sweet to my taste." [[WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}} Goodnight everybody!]]
** "My beloved put his hand by the hole [of the door] and my bowels were moved for him." That has to actually mean more than it lets on. [[note]]No, the speaker didn't actually ''soil herself''- "Bowels" was basically Hebrew for ''"heart."'' At the same time... he has his hands inside her 'hole' and her insides 'moved'.[[/note]]

to:

** "I sat down in his shadow [i.e., sat down while he was standing up]...and up] …and his fruit was sweet to my taste." [[WesternAnimation/{{Animaniacs}} Goodnight everybody!]]
** "My beloved put his hand by the hole [of the door] and my bowels were moved for him." That has to actually mean more than it lets on. [[note]]No, the speaker didn't actually ''soil herself''- "Bowels" herself''--"Bowels" was basically Hebrew for ''"heart."'' At the same time... time… he has his hands inside her 'hole' "hole" and her insides 'moved'."moved".[[/note]]
6th Sep '16 11:05:58 AM RubyVisiblyShaken
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...Wait, but what does "farthingale" mean when it's ''not'' an innuendo?

to:

...Wait, but what does "farthingale" mean when it's ''not'' an innuendo?innuendo?[[note]]It was apparently a "hooped petticoat or circular pad of fabric around the hips, formerly worn under women's skirts to extend and shape them." [[Main/AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Now you know.]] [[/note]]
26th Jul '16 6:42:50 PM eroock
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->''Mind you, the Elizabethans had so many words for the female genitals that it is quite hard to speak a sentence of modern English without inadvertently mentioning at least three of them.''

to:

->''Mind ->''"Mind you, the Elizabethans had so many words for the female genitals that it is quite hard to speak a sentence of modern English without inadvertently mentioning at least three of them.''"''
24th Jul '16 9:56:34 AM karstovich2
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* For anyone younger than 50, the word ''funky'' definitely makes this list. You probably grew up hearing it used in popular songs in expressions like "Get down! Get funky!" - and assumed the word simply meant "cool." But it originally referred to [[spoiler: the smell of a woman's vagina]].
** If still has that connotation, but more generalized when referring to smell.

to:

* For anyone younger than 50, the word ''funky'' definitely makes this list. You probably grew up hearing it used in popular songs in expressions like "Get down! Get funky!" - and assumed the word simply meant "cool." But it originally referred to [[spoiler: the smell of a woman's vagina]].
vagina, so that expression is actually an instruction/encouragement to engage in cunnilingus.
** If "Funky" still has that connotation, but more generalized when referring to smell.smell.
* Also related to meanings in living memory but no longer current" Music/SteelyDan's "The Fez" (off ''The Royal Scam'') is basically making fun of a guy who "won't do it without the fez on," the "fez" being 1970s slang for a condom.[[note]]Yes, there is some ValuesDissonance here; but you have to remember that in the 70s, (1) there was a wide array of easily-available, effective contraceptives (the pill, the IUD, the diaphragm...) and (2) so far as anyone knew, all [=STIs=] either were curable (antibiotic resistance wasn't on anyone's radar) or would not be prevented by condom use anyway, so insisting on a condom was seen as unhip and a mark that you didn't trust your partner. HIV's appearance at the end of the decade changed all that in a hurry...[[/note]]
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