History Main / GetTheeToANunnery

26th Jul '16 6:42:50 PM eroock
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->''Mind you, the Elizabethans had so many words for the female genitals that it is quite hard to speak a sentence of modern English without inadvertently mentioning at least three of them.''

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->''Mind ->''"Mind you, the Elizabethans had so many words for the female genitals that it is quite hard to speak a sentence of modern English without inadvertently mentioning at least three of them.''"''
24th Jul '16 9:56:34 AM karstovich2
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* For anyone younger than 50, the word ''funky'' definitely makes this list. You probably grew up hearing it used in popular songs in expressions like "Get down! Get funky!" - and assumed the word simply meant "cool." But it originally referred to [[spoiler: the smell of a woman's vagina]].
** If still has that connotation, but more generalized when referring to smell.

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* For anyone younger than 50, the word ''funky'' definitely makes this list. You probably grew up hearing it used in popular songs in expressions like "Get down! Get funky!" - and assumed the word simply meant "cool." But it originally referred to [[spoiler: the smell of a woman's vagina]].
vagina, so that expression is actually an instruction/encouragement to engage in cunnilingus.
** If "Funky" still has that connotation, but more generalized when referring to smell.smell.
* Also related to meanings in living memory but no longer current" Music/SteelyDan's "The Fez" (off ''The Royal Scam'') is basically making fun of a guy who "won't do it without the fez on," the "fez" being 1970s slang for a condom.[[note]]Yes, there is some ValuesDissonance here; but you have to remember that in the 70s, (1) there was a wide array of easily-available, effective contraceptives (the pill, the IUD, the diaphragm...) and (2) so far as anyone knew, all [=STIs=] either were curable (antibiotic resistance wasn't on anyone's radar) or would not be prevented by condom use anyway, so insisting on a condom was seen as unhip and a mark that you didn't trust your partner. HIV's appearance at the end of the decade changed all that in a hurry...[[/note]]
23rd Jul '16 4:28:57 PM nombretomado
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* In CarlBarks' ''Back to the Klondike'', Scrooge [=McDuck=] describes Glittering Goldie as "the only live one I ever knew." Given his reclusive, [[GoodIsNotNice asocial attitude towards life]], and disdain for everything except money up to that point, it's entirely possible (indeed, in context, there's no other logical interpretation) that he means this in the above-mentioned clinical sense of "know." This, along with a somewhat more overt gag, is an epic case of GettingCrapPastTheRadar; when questioned by observant fans at the exact nature of Scrooge and Goldie's relationship, Barks tactfully insisted it wasn't something his publishers would want to get into.

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* In CarlBarks' Creator/CarlBarks' ''Back to the Klondike'', Scrooge [=McDuck=] describes Glittering Goldie as "the only live one I ever knew." Given his reclusive, [[GoodIsNotNice asocial attitude towards life]], and disdain for everything except money up to that point, it's entirely possible (indeed, in context, there's no other logical interpretation) that he means this in the above-mentioned clinical sense of "know." This, along with a somewhat more overt gag, is an epic case of GettingCrapPastTheRadar; when questioned by observant fans at the exact nature of Scrooge and Goldie's relationship, Barks tactfully insisted it wasn't something his publishers would want to get into.
9th Feb '16 8:57:29 AM Prfnoff
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** ''Theatre/TheBibleTheCompleteWordOfGodAbridged'' naturally brings this in:
--->'''Nim''': I thought I knew you, Caphtorim.\\
'''Caphtorim''': You never really knew me. But Shem knows me two, three, even four times a night.
16th Jan '16 10:44:05 PM nombretomado
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** Gary Larson was forced to remove the word "dork" from one of his ''TheFarSide'' cartoons when his editor informed him that it meant "penis." He'd never heard of that meaning and looked it up in a slang dictionary to confirm it.

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** Gary Larson was forced to remove the word "dork" from one of his ''TheFarSide'' ''ComicStrip/TheFarSide'' cartoons when his editor informed him that it meant "penis." He'd never heard of that meaning and looked it up in a slang dictionary to confirm it.
27th Dec '15 10:51:36 AM nombretomado
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** "In the Biblical sense" is an idiom in modern day Hebrew. Used also in ''SisterAct''.

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** "In the Biblical sense" is an idiom in modern day Hebrew. Used also in ''SisterAct''.''Film/SisterAct''.
4th Dec '15 8:56:13 PM FF32
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** Creator/JackChick used this in one of his tracts about the tale of Sodom and Gommorah, with a side of DontExplainTheJoke

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** Creator/JackChick [[ComicBook/ChickTracts Jack Chick]] used this in one of his tracts about the tale of Sodom and Gommorah, with a side of DontExplainTheJoke
30th Nov '15 10:50:42 AM bravo104
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*** It's also used for symbolism regarding house Baratheon, whose sigil is [[AnimalMotifs is a stag.]] Robert Baratheon's wife Cersei [[spoiler: cheats on him with her own brother]], Renly Baratheon's wife Margaery [[spoiler: eventually marries two of his rivals, Joffrey and Tommen; Renly himself cheats on Margaery with her brother Loras, but she doesn't seem to mind too much.]] Stannis's wife Selyse doesn't cheat on him at all, but the Lannisters create propaganda saying she did.
30th Oct '15 3:28:29 PM Galacton
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The inverse trope to HaveAGayOldTime. Due to changes in vocabulary over time, something that originally was supposed to be DoubleEntendre-laden can often sound perfectly straightforward--or sometimes incomprehensible--to modern ears.

Creator/{{Shakespeare}} is probably the most common exemplar of this trope, both because he wrote [[TheRenaissance a long time ago]] and because he had a filthy streak wider than the [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen's]] farthingale. There was also no such thing as a "sensitive" listener who could not stand to hear a dirty joke in his day (except the Puritans, but they considered theatre itself to be sinful, so Shakespeare never seemed to keep their tastes in mind). The Queen's (and later King's) censors cared more about sedition and blasphemy than about sexual or scatological humor. This is how the [[IncrediblyLamePun awful puns]] in ''Henry V'' were allowed to be used while seemingly mild oaths like "Gadzooks" (God's hooks, or the nails that held Jesus to the cross) were banned.

''Nunnery'' meant both a convent for nuns and was an UnusualEuphemism for a brothel.[[note]]Because a common occurrence in Shakespeare's time and earlier was that, often, a nunnery convent ''would'' be pretty much a brothel in disguise, usually with the ''monks and priests'' taking sexual advantage of the women there.[[/note]] [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Now you know]]. For situations about women actually entering a convent, see TakingTheVeil and/or LockedAwayInAMonastery.

to:

The inverse trope to HaveAGayOldTime. Due to changes in vocabulary over time, something that originally was supposed to be raunchy and DoubleEntendre-laden can often sound perfectly straightforward--or sometimes incomprehensible--to modern ears.

Creator/{{Shakespeare}} is probably the most common exemplar of this trope, both because he wrote [[TheRenaissance a long time ago]] and because he had a [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar filthy streak streak]] wider than the [[UsefulNotes/ElizabethI Queen's]] farthingale. There was also no such thing as a "sensitive" listener who could not stand to hear a dirty joke in his day (except the Puritans, but they considered theatre itself to be sinful, so Shakespeare never seemed to keep their tastes in mind). The Queen's (and later King's) censors cared more about sedition and blasphemy than about sexual or scatological humor. This is how the [[IncrediblyLamePun awful puns]] in ''Henry V'' were allowed to be used while seemingly mild oaths like "Gadzooks" (God's hooks, or the nails that held Jesus to the cross) were banned.

''Nunnery'' meant both a convent for nuns and but was also used as an UnusualEuphemism for a brothel.[[note]]Because a common occurrence in Shakespeare's time and earlier was that, often, a nunnery convent ''would'' be pretty much a brothel in disguise, usually with the ''monks and priests'' taking sexual advantage of the women there.[[/note]] [[AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle Now you know]]. For situations about women actually entering a convent, see TakingTheVeil and/or LockedAwayInAMonastery.
15th Sep '15 9:30:29 PM Hadjorim
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