History Main / GermanicEfficiency

25th Oct '17 11:42:06 AM nighttrainfm
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Madrigal Elektromotiv [=GmbH=] from ''Series/BreakingBad'' gives off this impression. Their direct impact on the plot happens almost entirely through their american subsidiary, so the decision to make them Germans was most likely made just to emphasize that they are a highly efficient and organized industrial empire, way out of league of the small time gangs and even the Mexican cartel that Walter had been dealing with before.

to:

* Madrigal Elektromotiv [=GmbH=] from ''Series/BreakingBad'' gives off this impression. Their direct impact on the plot happens almost entirely through their american American subsidiary, so the decision to make them Germans was most likely made just to emphasize that they are a highly efficient and organized industrial empire, way out of the league of the small time small-time gangs and even the Mexican cartel that Walter had been dealing with before.
23rd Oct '17 5:00:56 AM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Current European economic policies, which consist mostly of austerity, are strongly advocated by [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany Chancellor Angela Merkel]] as the best solution, but she is heavily criticized for it throughout Europe, in Greece and France in particular (it led to government changes in both countries) although many countries in Northern Europe support her approach. In many ways, a ruthless adherence to this trope, insofar as Merkel's austerity agenda while taking a massive social and political in the afflicted countries, also helped keeping the Euro as common currency alive when many of her critics predicted its' demise.

to:

* Current European economic policies, which consist mostly of austerity, are strongly advocated by [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany Chancellor Angela Merkel]] as the best solution, but she is heavily criticized for it throughout Europe, in Greece and France in particular (it led to government changes in both countries) although many countries in Northern Europe support her approach. In many ways, a ruthless adherence to this trope, insofar as Merkel's austerity agenda while taking a massive social and political in the afflicted countries, also helped keeping the Euro as common currency alive when many of her critics predicted its' its demise.
22nd Oct '17 5:20:30 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Current European economic policies, which consist mostly of austerity, are strongly advocated by [[TheChancellorsOfGermany Chancellor Angela Merkel]] as the best solution, but she is heavily criticized for it throughout Europe, in Greece and France in particular (it led to government changes in both countries) although many countries in Northern Europe support her approach. In many ways, a ruthless adherence to this trope, insofar as Merkel's austerity agenda while taking a massive social and political in the afflicted countries, also helped keeping the Euro as common currency alive when many of her critics predicted its' demise.

to:

* Current European economic policies, which consist mostly of austerity, are strongly advocated by [[TheChancellorsOfGermany [[UsefulNotes/TheChancellorsOfGermany Chancellor Angela Merkel]] as the best solution, but she is heavily criticized for it throughout Europe, in Greece and France in particular (it led to government changes in both countries) although many countries in Northern Europe support her approach. In many ways, a ruthless adherence to this trope, insofar as Merkel's austerity agenda while taking a massive social and political in the afflicted countries, also helped keeping the Euro as common currency alive when many of her critics predicted its' demise.
3rd Sep '17 8:56:13 AM LentilSandEater
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Lampshaded (and noticeably averted) in ''One Day in September'', the 1999 documentary film on the Munich Olympics Massacre of 1972. British journalist and novelist Gerald Seymour comments that such was the German reputation for ruthless efficiency resulting from UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, no-one doubted they had an elite storm squad ready for such situations. They didn't, and a bungled rescue operation cost the lives of the hostages. The incident did however lead to the creation of GSG-9 (see RealLife).

to:

* Lampshaded (and noticeably averted) in Subverted ''One Day in September'', the 1999 documentary film on the Munich Olympics Massacre of 1972. British journalist and novelist Gerald Seymour comments that such was the German reputation for ruthless efficiency resulting from UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, no-one doubted they had an elite storm squad ready for such situations. They didn't, and a bungled rescue operation cost the lives of the hostages. The incident did however lead to the creation of GSG-9 (see RealLife).
1st Sep '17 4:03:42 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* German soldiers in the period of AllTheLittleGermanies were a DoubleSubversion. Germany was famous for being a ChewToy, but that was because of their political divisions. When one wanted soldiers, Germans were always a good buy.

to:

* German soldiers in the period of AllTheLittleGermanies UsefulNotes/AllTheLittleGermanies were a DoubleSubversion. Germany was famous for being a ChewToy, but that was because of their political divisions. When one wanted soldiers, Germans were always a good buy.
9th Aug '17 6:30:09 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the sequel, ''{{Freelancer}}'', Rheinland's military fighters are the most powerful of the four empires. They still fall very short of the Edge World ships though.

to:

** In the sequel, ''{{Freelancer}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Freelancer}}'', Rheinland's military fighters are the most powerful of the four empires. They still fall very short of the Edge World ships though.
21st Jul '17 11:09:02 PM DanielCase
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Another innovation was [[StrategyVersusTactics the invention of the military 'operation']] and the concept of lower-level initiative as a way of working around the imperfect nature and relatively slow speed of intelligence-gathering and messaging in the 19th century. Since all commanding officers were trained in strategies, tactics, and leadership, Generals were able to explain to their subordinates what goals they were supposed to accomplish and trust that they would adapt to any unexpected changes and exploit opportunities without having to wait for a messenger to bring updated orders. While this worked well for the pre-telephone era, by the time of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI this approach was dated and caused far more problems than it solved because more often than not subordinates would use their freedom of action to act in the 'self-interest' (reduced casualties, greater glory) of their own formations rather than that of the entire force[[note]] Insubordination by the Germans' First Army during the Battle Of The Marne forced the German right flank (then due east of Paris) to retreat because instead of conducting a defense-in-depth as they'd been ordered to [[AttackAttackAttack they'd tried to counter-attack the Franco-British force that was attacking them.]] This forced the entire German army to pull back, eliminating their chance of taking Verdun that year[[/note]]. Passable operational plans being blown to hell by insubordination at crucial junctures crippled the German war effort and prevented the German army from accomplishing ''anything in particular'' against ''anyone''.

to:

*** Another innovation was [[StrategyVersusTactics the invention of the military 'operation']] and the concept of lower-level initiative as a way of working around the imperfect nature and relatively slow speed of intelligence-gathering and messaging in the 19th century. Since all commanding officers were trained in strategies, tactics, and leadership, Generals were able to explain to their subordinates what goals they were supposed to accomplish and trust that they would adapt to any unexpected changes and exploit opportunities without having to wait for a messenger to bring updated orders. While this worked well for the pre-telephone era, by the time of UsefulNotes/WorldWarI this approach was dated and [[HoistByTheirOwnPetard caused far more problems than it solved solved]] because more often than not subordinates would use their freedom of action to act in the 'self-interest' (reduced casualties, greater glory) of their own formations rather than that of the entire force[[note]] Insubordination by the Germans' First Army during the Battle Of The Marne forced the German right flank (then due east of Paris) to retreat because instead of conducting a defense-in-depth as they'd been ordered to [[AttackAttackAttack they'd tried to counter-attack the Franco-British force that was attacking them.]] This forced the entire German army to pull back, eliminating their chance of taking Verdun that year[[/note]]. Passable operational plans being blown to hell by insubordination at crucial junctures crippled the German war effort and prevented the German army from accomplishing ''anything in particular'' against ''anyone''.
16th Jul '17 4:41:23 PM Jhonny
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** And before Rheinmetall, there was Krupp. During its heyday, the company was the backbone of German heavy industry, renowned for the quality of its steel products (after [=WW2=] it was discovered that German steel plate for their tanks was roughly 20% better than British steel). That quality then in turn translated to everything else from artillery to shipbuilding (also mainly for the military). The company still exists as part of [=ThyssenKrupp=], one of the largest industrial conglomerates in the world.

to:

** And before Rheinmetall, there was Krupp. During its heyday, the company was the backbone of German heavy industry, renowned for the quality of its steel products (after [=WW2=] it was discovered that German steel plate for their tanks was roughly 20% better than British steel). That quality then in turn translated to everything else from artillery to shipbuilding (also mainly for the military). The company still exists as part of [=ThyssenKrupp=], one of the largest industrial conglomerates in the world. One of the bigger contracts for Krupp before the merger with Thyssen was to deliver part of the "[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/InterCityExperimental Inter City Experimental]]" which was the SuperPrototype for [[UsefulNotes/DeutscheBahn Deutsche Bundesbahn's]] [[UsefulNotes/HighSpeedRail Inter City Express]]. Incidentally one of the other involved companies was Thyssen.
16th Jul '17 9:36:10 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Mauser C96 "Broomhandle", the service pistol of Nationalist China and a favorite with both Imperial Germany and the Ottoman Empire in WW1. Its 7.63mm round was the most powerful in the world until the invention of the .357 Magnum, capable of completely piercing WW2-era steel helmets.
** The Luger P08, whose distinctive, sleek looks and usage by the German military in both world wars made it one of the most famous handguns in the world. Most notably, Nazi Germany's use of it throughout the 1930s until the end of WW2 made it ''the'' bad guy gun in postwar fiction. However, the Luger is notoriously finicky and complex, making it a rather impractical sidearm, although it functions wonderfully as a target pistol.

to:

** The Mauser C96 "Broomhandle", the service pistol of Nationalist China and a favorite with both Imperial Germany and the Ottoman Empire in WW1. Its 7.63mm round was the most powerful in the world until the invention of the .357 Magnum, capable of completely piercing WW2-era [=WW2=]-era steel helmets.
** The Luger P08, whose distinctive, sleek looks and usage by the German military in both world wars made it one of the most famous handguns in the world. Most notably, Nazi Germany's use of it throughout the 1930s until the end of WW2 [=WW2=] made it ''the'' bad guy gun in postwar fiction. However, the Luger is notoriously finicky and complex, making it a rather impractical sidearm, although it functions wonderfully as a target pistol.



* During WW2, engineers working in the aeronautic branch of the military (especially the armament designers) often joked that their superiors constantly wanted them to break the laws of physics, so ''some'' of their inventions might be slightly flawed.

to:

* During WW2, [=WW2=], engineers working in the aeronautic branch of the military (especially the armament designers) often joked that their superiors constantly wanted them to break the laws of physics, so ''some'' of their inventions might be slightly flawed.



** And before Rheinmetall, there was Krupp. During its heyday, the company was the backbone of German heavy industry, renowned for the quality of its steel products (after WW2 it was discovered that German steel plate for their tanks was roughly 20% better than British steel). That quality then in turn translated to everything else from artillery to shipbuilding (also mainly for the military). The company still exists as part of [=ThyssenKrupp=], one of the largest industrial conglomerates in the world.

to:

** And before Rheinmetall, there was Krupp. During its heyday, the company was the backbone of German heavy industry, renowned for the quality of its steel products (after WW2 [=WW2=] it was discovered that German steel plate for their tanks was roughly 20% better than British steel). That quality then in turn translated to everything else from artillery to shipbuilding (also mainly for the military). The company still exists as part of [=ThyssenKrupp=], one of the largest industrial conglomerates in the world.
5th Jul '17 1:07:05 AM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Since Germany never really had extensive colonies and lost what little they had after just 30 years in World War I, it is one of the few major European countries that did not leave a lasting negative impression in Asia and Africa as an oppresive imperialist power. Which is part of the reason that one can still find numerous people with rather "naive" perceptions about the Nazi period.

to:

** Since Germany never really had extensive colonies and lost what little they had after just 30 years in World War I, it is one of the few major European countries that did not leave a lasting negative impression in Asia and Africa as an oppresive oppressive imperialist power. Which is part of the reason that one can still find numerous people with rather "naive" perceptions about the Nazi period.period.
*** Regarding Asia, Nationalist China was friendly with Germany from 1911 onwards. Notably, 1934 saw a team of German military advisors, lead by Alexander von Falkenhausen (who wasn't a Nazi) to bring German weapons and equipment to China and attempt to modernize the Chinese army. Although they were withdrawn in 1938 following Japanese pressure, Falkenhausen's suggestions helped China hold their ground against the Japanese for 8 years, though it was never enough to fully improve the Chinese army.
This list shows the last 10 events of 437. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GermanicEfficiency