History Main / GenderNeutralWriting

16th Feb '17 10:56:45 AM HammerOfJustice
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* In ''Manga/AssassinationClassroom'' it is mentioned that someone in Class-E has higher bloodlust than even [[spoiler: Itona]] the pronouns used are gender neutral despite the shot seemingly focusing on [[spoiler: Nagisa, the protagonist]]. This is used to hide that it's actually talking about [[spoiler: Kayano]]. In this case many fan translations were fooled and used the pronoun appropriate to the person the shot seemed to be focused on.

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* In ''Manga/AssassinationClassroom'' it is mentioned that someone in Class-E has higher bloodlust than even [[spoiler: Itona]] the pronouns used are gender neutral despite the shot seemingly focusing on [[spoiler: Nagisa, the protagonist]]. This is used to hide that it's actually talking about [[spoiler: Kayano]]. In this case many fan translations translaions, including the official one, were fooled and used the pronoun appropriate to the person the shot seemed to be focused on.
19th Jan '17 9:14:06 AM ZheToralf
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[[quoteright:350:[[Webcomic/DinosaurComics http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2016_03_07_15_05_01_xkcd__parody_week__dinosaur_comics.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[Webcomic/DinosaurComics [[quoteright:350:[[Webcomic/{{XKCD}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2016_03_07_15_05_01_xkcd__parody_week__dinosaur_comics.jpg]]]]
19th Jan '17 9:11:27 AM ZheToralf
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[[quoteright:350:[[Webcomic/{{XKCD}} http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2016_03_07_15_05_01_xkcd__parody_week__dinosaur_comics.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[Webcomic/{{XKCD}} [[quoteright:350:[[Webcomic/DinosaurComics http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/2016_03_07_15_05_01_xkcd__parody_week__dinosaur_comics.jpg]]]]
2nd Jan '17 6:57:34 AM Kiefen
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* ''{{WebAnimation/RWBY}}'' uses the term "Huntsmen" and "Huntresses" instead of "Hunters".

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* ''{{WebAnimation/RWBY}}'' uses the term "Huntsmen" and "Huntresses" instead of "Hunters".
24th Nov '16 9:17:17 AM bwburke94
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* Practically ubiquitous with the ChooseYourOwnAdventure genre of books, as mentioned above. With the exception of the recent rerelease, which tends to avoid showing you, illustrations tend to make it obvious what gender "you" are, as well as about what age. (In some of them, you were clearly an adult; in most, you were a kid.)
** Although the text often makes gender very vague or eliminates it. One example specified a character entering "the bathroom for the opposite sex" and gave a potential romantic interest a gender-neutral name.
*** In one book, however, you were obviously part of a Women's Olympic swim team

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* Practically ubiquitous with the ChooseYourOwnAdventure genre of books, as mentioned above. With the exception of the recent rerelease, which tends to avoid showing you, Although there are exceptions, illustrations tend to make it obvious what gender "you" are, as well as about what age. (In some of them, you were clearly an adult; in most, you were a kid.)
age.
** Although the The text itself often makes gender very vague or eliminates it. One example specified a character entering "the bathroom for the opposite sex" and gave a potential romantic interest a gender-neutral name.
*** In one book, however, you were obviously part of a Women's Olympic swim team
name.
13th Nov '16 1:13:53 PM Sammettik
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* In one Website/EpicTales story, Diana needs help from a friend to hack into CODIS. While talking about this friend both Diana and John keep referring to this friend with the word friend, rather then using 'he' or 'she'. It's so noticeable that it's obviously intentional.

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* In one Website/EpicTales ''Website/EpicTales'' story, Diana needs help from a friend to hack into CODIS. While talking about this friend both Diana and John keep referring to this friend with the word friend, rather then using 'he' or 'she'. It's so noticeable that it's obviously intentional.
13th Nov '16 1:08:11 PM Sammettik
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* ''[[VideoGame/NightsIntoDreams NiGHTS Journey of Dreams]]'', in the English manual translatinons at least, never uses pronouns, always referring to [=NiGHTS=] as [="NiGHTS"=].

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* ''[[VideoGame/NightsIntoDreams NiGHTS Journey of Dreams]]'', in the English manual translatinons translations at least, never uses pronouns, always referring to [=NiGHTS=] as [="NiGHTS"=].
13th Nov '16 1:07:20 PM Sammettik
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* Franchise/{{Kirby}} is consistently referred to with genderless pronouns in the Japanese versions of his games. In the west, however, the pink puffball is officially referred to with male ones (though he is never outright stated to be male) because of how this trope doesn't work out as well in English as it does in Japanese.

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* Franchise/{{Kirby}} is consistently referred to with genderless pronouns in the Japanese versions of his games. games for no official reason other than to be "mysterious". In the west, however, the pink puffball is officially referred to with male ones (though he is never outright stated to be male) because of how this trope doesn't work out as well in English as it does in Japanese.Japanese. Indeed, the Nintendo of America attempted to use this ''once'' in a early ''Kirby 64'' preview, and quickly dumped it presumably because of how awkward it came off.
25th Oct '16 2:38:44 PM Terwanuli
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And let's not forget the far more strongly-gendered languages (like Spanish or German) where pulling this off without looking or sounding 'fake' is... at least very difficult [[note]]In German the only established third person Singular personal pronouns "sie" (her) and "er" (him) are clearly binary gender marked. However, it does get easier in other grammatical forms: first and second person personal pronouns are not gender specific and so isn't the third person in Plural. There are also other problems concerning binary gendered language, e.g. since many (common) german nouns are (binary) gender specific. e.g. "Alex is a police officer" would have a (slightly) different german noun depending on Alex' gender ("Alex ist (eine) Polizistin [woman]/ (ein) Polizist [man]"), although [[GenderBenderName the name wouldn't tell]]. But there are ways to come by which normally won't cause (much) attention: the participle forms in plural are the same for maskulin and feminin grammatical gender ((female) workers: Arbeiterinnen; (male) workers: Arbeiter; workers (regardless of gender)/ working people: Arbeitende (participle)). Often you can avoid the gender specific noun. ("Alex works for the police.") [[/note]]

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And let's not forget the far more strongly-gendered languages (like Spanish or German) where pulling this off without looking or sounding 'fake' is... at least very difficult [[note]]In German the only established third person Singular personal pronouns "sie" (her) and "er" (him) are clearly binary gender marked. However, it does get easier in other grammatical forms: first and second person personal pronouns are not gender specific and so isn't the third person in Plural. There are also other problems concerning binary gendered language, e.g. since many (common) german nouns are (binary) gender specific. e.g. "Alex is a police officer" would have a (slightly) different german noun depending on Alex' gender ("Alex ist (eine) Polizistin [woman]/ (ein) Polizist [man]"), although [[GenderBenderName [[GenderBlenderName the name wouldn't tell]]. But there are ways to come by which normally won't cause (much) attention: the participle forms in plural are the same for maskulin and feminin grammatical gender ((female) workers: Arbeiterinnen; (male) workers: Arbeiter; workers (regardless of gender)/ working people: Arbeitende (participle)). Often you can avoid the gender specific noun. ("Alex works for the police.") [[/note]]
25th Oct '16 2:36:40 PM Terwanuli
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And let's not forget the far more strongly-gendered languages (like Spanish or German) where pulling this off without looking or sounding 'fake' is next to impossible...

to:

And let's not forget the far more strongly-gendered languages (like Spanish or German) where pulling this off without looking or sounding 'fake' is... at least very difficult [[note]]In German the only established third person Singular personal pronouns "sie" (her) and "er" (him) are clearly binary gender marked. However, it does get easier in other grammatical forms: first and second person personal pronouns are not gender specific and so isn't the third person in Plural. There are also other problems concerning binary gendered language, e.g. since many (common) german nouns are (binary) gender specific. e.g. "Alex is next a police officer" would have a (slightly) different german noun depending on Alex' gender ("Alex ist (eine) Polizistin [woman]/ (ein) Polizist [man]"), although [[GenderBenderName the name wouldn't tell]]. But there are ways to impossible...
come by which normally won't cause (much) attention: the participle forms in plural are the same for maskulin and feminin grammatical gender ((female) workers: Arbeiterinnen; (male) workers: Arbeiter; workers (regardless of gender)/ working people: Arbeitende (participle)). Often you can avoid the gender specific noun. ("Alex works for the police.") [[/note]]
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