History Main / GenderNeutralWriting

13th Jan '16 1:54:52 PM Arruruerie
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A couple people actually do refer to Undyne as a she before she unmasks (namely Monster Kid and a couple of Snowdin NP Cs), and with regards to Mettaton, I do think it's worth taking it for what it is that he's referred to as a he when he's a member of an otherwise gender-neutral species in a game that's fine with calling characters who aren't meant to be explicitly one or the other "they".
* The Fallen Child from ''{{VideoGame/Undertale}}'' is consistently talked to and about as "them" or "they", and the sprite of them is very ambigous. [[spoiler: So is Frisk, the Player Character.]] Most of the fandom continues this trait, though many believe depict them mainly as female. ** Undyne is not mentioned as male or female until you finally [[spoiler: fight her, and she turns up to be a thin fish-woman.]] Likewise, Mettaton has never been described as having the mind of any gender [[spoiler: and his "EX" form manages to be both extremely hot, wellshaped and completely androgynous]].
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* The Fallen Child player character from ''{{VideoGame/Undertale}}'' is consistently talked to and about as "them" or "they", and the sprite of them is very ambigous. ambiguous. [[spoiler: So is Frisk, The same goes for the Player Character.original Fallen Child.]] Most of the fandom continues this trait, this, though many believe interpret or depict them mainly as female. ** Undyne is not mentioned female. All of the game's ghost monsters (such as male or female until you finally Napstablook) are also talked about with exclusively gender-neutral pronouns [[spoiler: fight her, except for Mettaton, who, despite his original species and she turns up to be a thin fish-woman.]] Likewise, Mettaton has never been described as having the mind of any gender [[spoiler: and his "EX" form manages to be both extremely hot, wellshaped well-shaped, and completely androgynous]].androgynous design of his EX form, is always referred to as male]].
12th Jan '16 9:24:38 AM Onomateopoetic
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* The Fallen Child from ''VideoGame/Undertale'' is consistently talked to and about as "them" or "they", and the sprite of them is very ambigous. [[spoiler: So is Frisk, the Player Character.]] Most of the fandom continues this trait, though many believe depict them mainly as female.
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* The Fallen Child from ''VideoGame/Undertale'' ''{{VideoGame/Undertale}}'' is consistently talked to and about as "them" or "they", and the sprite of them is very ambigous. [[spoiler: So is Frisk, the Player Character.]] Most of the fandom continues this trait, though many believe depict them mainly as female.
12th Jan '16 9:23:25 AM Onomateopoetic
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* The Fallen Child from ''VideoGame/Undertale'' is consistently talked to and about as "them" or "they", and the sprite of them is very ambigous. [[spoiler: So is Frisk, the Player Character.]] Most of the fandom continues this trait, though many believe depict them mainly as female. ** Undyne is not mentioned as male or female until you finally [[spoiler: fight her, and she turns up to be a thin fish-woman.]] Likewise, Mettaton has never been described as having the mind of any gender [[spoiler: and his "EX" form manages to be both extremely hot, wellshaped and completely androgynous]].
31st Dec '15 2:04:42 PM Nothingtoseehere
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This is most common in interactive fiction designed for players and avatars of any sex and gender. This generally shows up in games where the developers were too constrained (or, perhaps, too lazy) to have the game capable of modifying the dialogue to fit all genders, so they try to write for all. This leads to an {{AFGNCAAP}} (although as that article mentions, they more often than not fail because they assume MostGamersAreMale). The ChooseYourOwnAdventure genre makes heavy use of this (along with SecondPersonNarration), since they won't exactly split the book into volumes to accommodate everyone. Often, they get around this by either assuming a gender based on the genre of the book (e.g., a science fiction book would assume a male reader while a book that places the character as nobility in medieval Europe would assume a female reader) or by just creating a very generic character with a PurelyAestheticGender. This is also the main reason ChooseYourOwnAdventure books are written in the second person. It's not entirely rare for it to show up in other fiction, though.
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This is most common in interactive fiction designed for players and avatars of any sex and gender. This generally shows up in games where the developers were too constrained (or, perhaps, too lazy) to have the game capable of modifying the dialogue to fit all genders, so they try to write for all. This leads to an {{AFGNCAAP}} FeaturelessProtagonist (although as that article mentions, they more often than not fail because they assume MostGamersAreMale). The ChooseYourOwnAdventure genre makes heavy use of this (along with SecondPersonNarration), since they won't exactly split the book into volumes to accommodate everyone. Often, they get around this by either assuming a gender based on the genre of the book (e.g., a science fiction book would assume a male reader while a book that places the character as nobility in medieval Europe would assume a female reader) or by just creating a very generic character with a PurelyAestheticGender. This is also the main reason ChooseYourOwnAdventure books are written in the second person. It's not entirely rare for it to show up in other fiction, though.
7th Dec '15 8:51:48 AM Hossmeister
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* In ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney: Justice for All'': [[spoiler: everyone in court refers to Adrian Andrews this way while the assassin De Killer is listening to proceedings, because in one later testimony he refers to the [[GenderBlenderName (female) Adrian as 'him']], thus revealing that he did not meet her in person]].
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* In ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorney: Justice for All'': ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyJusticeForAll'': [[spoiler: everyone in court refers to Adrian Andrews this way while the assassin De Killer is listening to proceedings, because in one later testimony he refers to the [[GenderBlenderName (female) Adrian as 'him']], thus revealing that he did not meet her in person]].
6th Oct '15 12:07:07 AM HarpieSiren
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* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2'', almost nobody but Roxas refers to Xion by gender. This is understandable, since [[spoiler: while Xion considers herself female, she's a memory construct who everyone sees differently based on their connection to Sora. Xigbar, for instance, sees Ven...who looks exactly like Roxas (KudzuPlot ahoy).]]
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* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts358DaysOver2'', almost nobody but Roxas refers to Xion by gender. This is understandable, since [[spoiler: while Xion considers herself female, she's a memory construct who everyone sees differently based on their connection to Sora. Xigbar, for instance, sees Ven...who looks exactly like Roxas (KudzuPlot ahoy).Roxas. While Saix sees a faceless puppet.]]
5th Oct '15 9:44:48 PM AsterSelene
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* In ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'', the culprit of Chapter 3's motive ([[spoiler:Mikan Tsumiki]]) is centered around their "beloved". The Japanese version never mentions said "beloved"'s gender, so the audience might be reasonably able to suspect that the "beloved" is a romantic lover. [[spoiler:Turns out that said "beloved" is the female Junko Enoshima, which, LesYay implications aside, means that Tsumiki likely intended to say that she "loved" her in a fit of despair.]] The English localization tries to use "their" in a way of covering this up, though it then trips the player's radar as to why it would be used for someone the culprit should most definitely know the gender of.
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* In ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'', the culprit of Chapter 3's motive 3 ([[spoiler:Mikan Tsumiki]]) Tsumiki]])'s motive is centered around their "beloved". The Japanese version never mentions said "beloved"'s gender, so the audience might be reasonably able to suspect that the "beloved" is a romantic lover. [[spoiler:Turns out that said "beloved" is the female Junko Enoshima, which, LesYay implications aside, means that Tsumiki likely intended to say that she "loved" her in a fit of despair.]] The English localization tries to use "their" in a way of covering this up, though it then trips the player's radar as to why it would be used for someone the culprit should most definitely know the gender of.
5th Oct '15 9:41:18 PM AsterSelene
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* In ''VisualNovel/SuperDanganRonpa2'', the culprit of Chapter 3's motive ([[spoiler:Mikan Tsumiki]]) is centered around their "beloved". The Japanese version never mentions said "beloved"'s gender, so the audience might be reasonably able to suspect that the "beloved" is a romantic lover. [[spoiler:Turns out that said "beloved" is the female Junko Enoshima, which, LesYay implications aside, means that Tsumiki likely intended to say that she "loved" her in a fit of despair.]] The English localization tries to use "their" in a way of covering this up, though it then trips the player's radar as to why it would be used for someone the culprit should most definitely know the gender of.
18th Aug '15 9:03:05 AM thatother1dude
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* ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'' uses this as the standard, with author Isayama Hajime very rarely making ''any'' reference to the gender of characters. Since GenderIsNoObject, he even invited fans to determine for themselves the gender of the ever-[[AmbiguousGender Ambiguous]] Hange Zoe.
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* ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'' uses this as the standard, with author Isayama Hajime very rarely making ''any'' reference to the gender of characters. Since GenderIsNoObject, he even [[ShrugOfGod invited fans to determine for themselves themselves]] the gender of the ever-[[AmbiguousGender Ambiguous]] Hange Zoe.
6th Aug '15 10:41:03 PM Stealth
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* Most of the time in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', the Courier is not mentioned unless addressed directly, and in those rare instances otherwise (usually narration) the game will usually just use "The Courier" rather than a name or gender pronoun. An amusing example is the Gun Runners' Vendertron robot, which apparently has problem identifying gender. Rather than actually working to fix the problem, they took the lazy way out instead and just made it greet everyone with an awkward yet blithely polite "Welcome sir or madam."
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* Most of the time in ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'', the Courier is not mentioned unless addressed directly, and in those rare instances otherwise (usually narration) the game will usually just use "The Courier" rather than a name or gender pronoun. An amusing example is the Gun Runners' Vendertron robot, which apparently has problem problems with identifying gender. genders (the existence of Super Mutants may have something to do with this, as they all have masculine bodies and voices, even those who had been women). Rather than actually working to fix the problem, they took chose the lazy way out easier solution instead and just made it politely greet everyone with an awkward yet blithely polite technically accurate "Welcome sir or madam."
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