History Main / GameSystem

23rd Jan '16 7:15:24 AM Koveras
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* ''Powered by the Apocalypse'': Originally developed for ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'', it has since been adapted to a number of other [=RPGs=], e.g. ''Dungeon World'', ''TabletopGame/MonsterOfTheWeek'', ''TabletopGame/{{Monsterhearts}}'', ''Sagas of the Icelanders'', etc. While not a UniversalSystem ''per se'', it is designed to be lightweight and easily hackable, making it uniquely easy to adapt to any setting and narrative genre.

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* ''Powered by the Apocalypse'': ''TabletopGame/PoweredByTheApocalypse'': Originally developed for ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'', it has since been adapted to a number of other [=RPGs=], e.g. ''Dungeon World'', ''TabletopGame/MonsterOfTheWeek'', ''TabletopGame/{{Monsterhearts}}'', ''Sagas of the Icelanders'', etc. While not a UniversalSystem ''per se'', it is designed to be lightweight and easily hackable, making it uniquely easy to adapt to any setting and narrative genre.
8th Jan '16 1:46:42 AM Koveras
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* ''Powered by the Apocalypse'': Originally developed for ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'', it has since been adapted to a number of other [=RPGs=], e.g. ''Dungeon World'', ''TabletopGame/MonsterOfTheWeek'', ''Monsterhearts'', ''Sagas of the Icelanders'', etc.

to:

* ''Powered by the Apocalypse'': Originally developed for ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'', it has since been adapted to a number of other [=RPGs=], e.g. ''Dungeon World'', ''TabletopGame/MonsterOfTheWeek'', ''Monsterhearts'', ''TabletopGame/{{Monsterhearts}}'', ''Sagas of the Icelanders'', etc.etc. While not a UniversalSystem ''per se'', it is designed to be lightweight and easily hackable, making it uniquely easy to adapt to any setting and narrative genre.
13th Oct '15 1:10:08 AM Koveras
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* ''Powered by the Apocalypse'': Originally developed for ''TabletopGame/ApocalypseWorld'', it has since been adapted to a number of other [=RPGs=], e.g. ''Dungeon World'', ''TabletopGame/MonsterOfTheWeek'', ''Monsterhearts'', ''Sagas of the Icelanders'', etc.
14th Jun '15 4:35:40 AM narm00
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[[/index]]



[[index]]



** ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness''


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** The ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'', however, uses the Storytelling system, a cousin system to Storyteller.
9th Jun '15 2:47:53 AM fdsa1234567890
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* ''TabletopGame/{{FATE}}''
12th Apr '15 9:08:31 AM Kuruni
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** ''TabletopGame/{{Scion}}''
** ''TabletopGame/TrinityUniverse''
4th Apr '15 8:55:33 AM Kuruni
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* ''UsefulNotes/Unisystem''

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* ''UsefulNotes/Unisystem''''UsefulNotes/{{Unisystem}}''
4th Apr '15 8:55:01 AM Kuruni
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* ''UsefulNotes/Unisystem''
29th Mar '15 3:00:21 AM Wiadi
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Specific Game Systems sometimes go through dozens of revisions. Each new version can be expected to either clarify existing rules (if ambiguities have arisen in previous versions), add entirely new mechanics to the system (ie, adding a new section for vehicular combat rules), or streamline existing rules that have been discovered to be unwieldy or poorly-designed.

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Specific Game Systems sometimes go through dozens of revisions. Each new version can be expected to either clarify existing rules (if ambiguities have arisen in previous versions), add entirely new mechanics to the system (ie, (e.g., adding a new section for vehicular combat rules), or streamline existing rules that have been discovered to be unwieldy or poorly-designed.
9th Jan '15 5:44:59 PM N1KF
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Most {{Game System}}s involve using numerical statistics to mathematically chart a character's abilities, though the exact stats and the nature of their use varies widely between systems. In addition, most systems generally involve some randomness, so that there's an element of chance in most actions -- you can't be 100% certain beforehand whether your attempt will succeed or fail. In TabletopGames, this typically takes the form of dice-rolling, while VideoGames use random number generators instead. In addition, there's typically one person who takes the role of "referee", controlling {{NPC}}'s actions and deciding how rules apply in specific situations. The computer AI does this in VideoGame {{RPG}}s, but it falls to a human GameMaster to do this in TabletopGames -- this, unsurprisingly, means that tabletop {{RPG}}s tend to be much more flexible and fluid than computer-based ones, due to the fact that a program can only handle what it's been programmed to, while a person is much more capable of improvisation.

{{Game System}}s can be divided into two general categories: {{Character Class System}}s and {{Point Build System}}s. A CharacterClassSystem has each player pick their character's "class" (which represents a specific skillset, like combat or stealth) and allows them to advance according to that class's abilities. A PointBuildSystem, on the other hand, allows players to spend character points on whatever SkillScoresAndPerks they want; balance is provided by the cost of abilities and how many points players are allowed to spend, rather than balancing specific classes against each other.

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Most {{Game System}}s Game Systems involve using numerical statistics to mathematically chart a character's abilities, though the exact stats and the nature of their use varies widely between systems. In addition, most systems generally involve some randomness, so that there's an element of chance in most actions -- you can't be 100% certain beforehand whether your attempt will succeed or fail. In TabletopGames, this typically takes the form of dice-rolling, while VideoGames use random number generators instead. In addition, there's typically one person who takes the role of "referee", controlling {{NPC}}'s actions and deciding how rules apply in specific situations. The computer AI does this in VideoGame {{RPG}}s, but it falls to a human GameMaster to do this in TabletopGames -- this, unsurprisingly, means that tabletop {{RPG}}s tend to be much more flexible and fluid than computer-based ones, due to the fact that a program can only handle what it's been programmed to, while a person is much more capable of improvisation.

{{Game System}}s Game Systems can be divided into two general categories: {{Character Class System}}s and {{Point Build System}}s. A CharacterClassSystem has each player pick their character's "class" (which represents a specific skillset, like combat or stealth) and allows them to advance according to that class's abilities. A PointBuildSystem, on the other hand, allows players to spend character points on whatever SkillScoresAndPerks they want; balance is provided by the cost of abilities and how many points players are allowed to spend, rather than balancing specific classes against each other.



Specific {{Game System}}s sometimes go through dozens of revisions. Each new version can be expected to either clarify existing rules (if ambiguities have arisen in previous versions), add entirely new mechanics to the system (ie, adding a new section for vehicular combat rules), or streamline existing rules that have been discovered to be unwieldy or poorly-designed.

to:

Specific {{Game System}}s Game Systems sometimes go through dozens of revisions. Each new version can be expected to either clarify existing rules (if ambiguities have arisen in previous versions), add entirely new mechanics to the system (ie, adding a new section for vehicular combat rules), or streamline existing rules that have been discovered to be unwieldy or poorly-designed.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GameSystem