History Main / GameShowWinningsCap

19th Nov '16 7:19:19 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''The Price Is Right'' used to limit contestants to one appearance in a lifetime on the show, whether they played a pricing game or not. Since Drew Carey became the host, however, contestants can return 10 years after they first played, which such contestants often reference on their t-shirts and/or when they chat with Drew after getting out of Contestant's Row.



* The Price Is Right used to limit contestants to one appearance in a lifetime on the show, whether they played a pricing game or not. Since Drew Carey became the host, however, contestants can return 10 years after they first played, which such contestants often reference on their t-shirts and/or when they chat with Drew after getting out of Contestant's Row.
6th Sep '16 4:32:51 PM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This refers to the syndicated versions. The versions that ran on CBS had the $25,000 limit (although nobody on the CBS version of ''TTD'' reached the limit).

to:

** This refers to the syndicated versions. The versions that ran on CBS had the $25,000 limit (although nobody on the CBS version of ''TTD'' reached the limit).limit- mainly because it only ran from July to September of 1978).
11th May '16 6:53:20 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Japan has a nationwide cap set at 2 million yen (currently around US$16,520 / £11,500 as of February 2016) per person and 10 million yen total for a prize split among five or more players. As a result, even single-player shows like ''Millionaire'' have the contestant bring along four friends and/or family members with whom to split the prize.
** This is the reason why almost all game/quiz shows use celebrities: their winnings can just be added to their salary as a bonus.

to:

* Japan has a nationwide cap set at 2 million yen (currently around US$16,520 $18,455 / £11,500 £12,755 as of February May 2016) per person and 10 million yen total for a prize split among five or more players.players (about $92,277 / £63,888). As a result, even single-player shows like ''Millionaire'' have the contestant bring along four friends and/or family members with whom to split the prize.
** This is the reason why almost all game/quiz shows [[CelebrityEdition use celebrities: celebrities]]: their winnings can just be added to their salary as a bonus.
1st Feb '16 6:12:36 PM navaash
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Japan has a nationwide cap set at 2 million yen (currently around US$19,600 / £11,700 as of February 2014) per person and 10 million yen total for a prize split among five or more players. As a result, even single-player shows like ''Millionaire'' have the contestant bring along four friends and/or family members with whom to split the prize.

to:

* Japan has a nationwide cap set at 2 million yen (currently around US$19,600 US$16,520 / £11,700 £11,500 as of February 2014) 2016) per person and 10 million yen total for a prize split among five or more players. As a result, even single-player shows like ''Millionaire'' have the contestant bring along four friends and/or family members with whom to split the prize.
20th Jan '16 5:07:31 PM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message
20th Jan '16 5:07:30 PM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''[[Series/BreakTheBank1985 Break The Bank]]'' (1985-86) limited the winnings to $75,000. Once the Master Puzzle format was instituted, breaking the Bank retired a winning couple immediately.

to:

* ''[[Series/BreakTheBank1985 Break The Bank]]'' (1985-86) limited the winnings to $75,000.$75,000- this was due to airing on CBS' New York O&O station, so they had to follow their winnings cap. Once the Master Puzzle format was instituted, breaking the Bank retired a winning couple immediately.
6th Dec '15 7:36:26 AM Gimere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* A number of shows (examples: ''The $10,000/$20,000 Pyramid'', ''Now You See It'', and ''The Moneymaze'') retired a contestant who won its top prize, regardless of what it was (on ''Now You See It'', it could be as little as $5000).

to:

* A number of shows (examples: ''The ''[[Series/{{Pyramid}} The $10,000/$20,000 Pyramid'', ''Now You See It'', Pyramid]]'', ''Series/NowYouSeeIt'', and ''The Moneymaze'') retired a contestant who won its top prize, regardless of what it was (on ''Now You See It'', it could be as little as $5000).



** ''[[Series/SaleOftheCentury Sale of the Century]]''[='s=] derisory prizes became such a joke that successful contestants were invited to play the Australian ''Sale'' for bigger prizes.

to:

** ''[[Series/SaleOftheCentury Sale of the Century]]''[='s=] ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury''[='s=] derisory prizes became such a joke that successful contestants were invited to play the Australian ''Sale'' for bigger prizes.
4th Nov '15 6:31:18 PM WarioBarker
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Way back in the earlier days of television in TheFifties (more specifically, 1956), a man named Herb Stempel competed on the GameShow ''Series/TwentyOne''. Although he claimed to have intentionally lost to Charles van Doren upon instruction by producer Dan Enright, he was ignored until ''Dotto'' was found to have been certifiably rigged two years later. After that, the entire game show industry was [[GenreKiller nearly brought down]].

to:

Way back in the earlier days of television in TheFifties (more specifically, 1956), a man named Herb Stempel competed on the GameShow ''Series/TwentyOne''. Although he claimed to have intentionally lost to Charles van Doren upon instruction by producer Dan Enright, he was ignored until ''Dotto'' ''Series/{{Dotto}}'' was found to have been certifiably rigged two years later. After that, the entire game show industry was [[GenreKiller nearly brought down]].



** Creator/{{CBS}} imposed a cap on game show winnings. Initially, contestants on CBS-affiliated game shows were retired after winning $25,000, and could not keep any winnings over that limit (although sometime in the mid-to-late 1970s, a contestant could keep up to $10,000 more than the limit, for a $35,000 maximum payout). The cap increased to $50,000 in 1984, $75,000 by 1986, then $125,000 in the early 1990s. Come 2006, with ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' having long since been the only CBS original game show, the winnings cap was done away with entirely.

to:

** Creator/{{CBS}} imposed a cap on game show winnings. Initially, contestants on CBS-affiliated game shows were retired after winning $25,000, and could not keep any winnings over that limit (although sometime in the mid-to-late 1970s, a contestant could keep up to $10,000 more than the limit, for a $35,000 maximum payout). The cap increased to $50,000 in 1984, $75,000 by 1986, then $125,000 in the early 1990s. Come 2006, with ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'' having long since been the only CBS original game show, the winnings cap was done away with entirely.
11th Oct '15 7:40:43 PM cmj
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In the United Kingdom, the Independent Broadcasting Authority (which oversaw pretty much everything that wasn't Creator/TheBBC) imposed a £6,000 per-episode cap in 1982. When the IBA was scrapped at the end of 1990, one of the first acts of its successor, the Independent Television Commission, was to remove the cap, though it was still a few years before the really big money shows started to turn up.
** There was a revival of ''The $64,000 Question'' (and yes, it was titled in dollars) which offered a top prize of £6,400, but they got around this by alternating contestants so that the top prize would not be won twice in a row.

to:

* In the United Kingdom, the Independent Broadcasting Television Authority (which oversaw pretty much everything that wasn't Creator/TheBBC) imposed a £6,000 per-episode cap in 1982. When following the IBA 1950s rigging scandals in the US. For at least two decades, this limit was scrapped fixed at the end of 1990, one of the first acts of its successor, £6,000 with no adjustment for inflation. Eventual successor the Independent Television Commission, was to Commission would eventually remove the cap, though it was still a few years before the really big money shows started to turn up.cap in 1994.
** There was a revival of ''The $64,000 Question'' (and yes, it was titled in dollars) which offered a top prize of £6,400, but they got around this by alternating contestants so that the top prize would not be won twice in a row.row - once contestants reached £1,600 they would effectively tackle their remaining questions at a rate of one per episode. They eventually persuaded the ITC to increase the limit to £6,400.
9th Oct '15 2:19:51 AM Morgenthaler
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Considering that they were the ones who rigged game shows in the first place, Creator/JackBarry and Dan Enright Productions didn't limit returning champions on their flagship shows ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''TheJokersWild'' you could literally stay on as long as you kept winning. However, there was a brief period where the shows imposed winnings caps (at the network owned-and-operated stations' insistence). There was no winnings limit at the time when Thom [=McKee=] (the most famous contestant on ''Tic Tac Dough'') appeared, and he went on to win $312,000 in cash and prizes.

to:

* Considering that they were the ones who rigged game shows in the first place, Creator/JackBarry and Dan Enright Productions didn't limit returning champions on their flagship shows ''Series/TicTacDough'' and ''TheJokersWild'' ''Series/TheJokersWild'' you could literally stay on as long as you kept winning. However, there was a brief period where the shows imposed winnings caps (at the network owned-and-operated stations' insistence). There was no winnings limit at the time when Thom [=McKee=] (the most famous contestant on ''Tic Tac Dough'') appeared, and he went on to win $312,000 in cash and prizes.
This list shows the last 10 events of 60. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.GameShowWinningsCap