History Main / GamePlayAndStorySegregation

19th Sep '17 3:03:05 PM Kadorhal
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* In ''VideoGame/{{Drakengard}}'', you're only allowed to take one party member with you into battle, and he doesn't follow along with you on the battlefield, no; you transform into him for a predetermined amount of time. Contrast this to the {{cutscene}}s, which show all the party members present in the battles when applicable. Dragonfire kills anything human in a single blow, but not so for some higher-end Mooks in-game. Caim wields a relatively smallish BFS as his default weapon in the cutscenes, but his default weapon in-game is realistically proportioned to be used by a human being. Manah can obliterate armies in cutscenes, but never displays this sort of power when fighting you in-game. And so on in that order.

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* In ''VideoGame/{{Drakengard}}'', you're only allowed to take one party member with you into battle, and he doesn't follow along with you on the battlefield, no; you transform into him for a predetermined amount of time. Contrast this to the {{cutscene}}s, which show all the party members present in the battles when applicable. Dragonfire kills anything human in a single blow, but not so for some higher-end Mooks in-game. Caim wields a relatively smallish BFS as his default weapon in the cutscenes, but his default weapon in-game is realistically proportioned to be used by a human being. Manah can obliterate armies in cutscenes, but never displays this sort of power when fighting you in-game. And so on in that order. Heck, an important NPC in ''Drakengard 2'' is one of the party members from the first game - who was completely unavailable until you beat the game once and as such never actually joins up with Caim or is even hinted to exist in the path to the ending that the second game follows from.
12th Sep '17 6:14:24 PM crazyrabbits
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* ''GameplayAndStorySegregation/MassEffect''



* ''VideoGame/MassEffect2'':
** Jack, a.k.a. Subject Zero, is supposed to be the most powerful human biotic alive, which is shown in a cutscene where she one-shots three YMIR Heavy Mechs, which are some of the deadliest foes in the game. In the game itself? She's terrible, and probably the weakest biotic on the team. She only has three abilities (Warp Ammo, Shockwave, and Pull), none of which deal even moderate damage or have any effect on enemies with armor/shields (guess which defenses YMIR Heavy Mechs have?). This is especially noticeable if you bring her on the mission where you actually do fight three of those mechs; none of her attacks do anything to them and she will usually be killed a minute into the mission.
** The Quarian fleet only allows Tali, Shepard and one other squadmate[[note]]Standard for a loyalty mission; the squadmate in question must be present[[/note]] to board their flagship. You know, the race known for being the most extreme germophobes in the universe? Shepard has to wear his/her helmet at all times, and most of the squadmates do the same - except for a select few (Jack, Samara, Miranda, Jacob) that are apparently able to waltz onboard with nothing more than a breathing mask, walk around without anyone commenting and sit in the middle of the crowd during Tali's exile hearing.
** Shepard walks around toting an Avenger assault rifle throughout the game - this will occur even if you've been using another primary weapon, [[NoCutsceneInventoryInertia never equipped the Avenger for a mission]] or didn't specialize in assault rifles in the first place. In addition, several of your squad members use assault rifles for most group scenes in the Suicide Mission, even if they weren't seen disembarking the Normandy with one or if they didn't have the requisite training.
** The Krogan treat fighting a Thresher Maw on foot like it's a big thing. In the first game, a sufficiently well-grinded character can defeat like a dozen of them on foot over the course of the game. A somewhat marginal example, since Shepard is acknowledged as possibly the greatest warrior who ever lived by the Krogan.
** On a couple occasions you and your squad can kill Krogans (the huge, hulking species with redundant organs, extremely thick hides and extreme regeneration abilities) in a matter of 2 seconds with the Shuriken Machine Pistol (does the least amount of damage in the game, and is especially weak against armor, which some Krogans have) in cutscenes. In gameplay Krogans take a rather long time to take down even with powerful weapons like the Phalanx.
** No matter how powerful a biotic you are, no matter how strong all your biotic abilities are shown to be... you are never even ''considered'' for the position of the one who holds the biotic shield at the end of the game. You could have skills comparable to (if not greater than) an ''Asari Justicar'' (which you have in your party, by the way), but you are not even considered as a biotic. Until ''Mass Effect 3'', all cutscenes showed Shepard as a soldier without using any fancy tricks, like biotic powers or engineering tricks... which most of the character classes you can choose from would have.
** Heat sink technology was brought in during the two years between ''1'' and ''2'', based on geth technology salvaged after the final battle, yet the ten-year-old wreck of the ''Hugo Gernsback'' has a plentiful supply of heat sinks [[note]]as well as mechs which didn't exist in the first game, yet are identical to the one's Shep's been fighting, including their ability to use guns with thermal clips[[/note]]. In addition, heat sinks are supposedly interchangeable between all geth and Citadel species weapons, yet your ammo supply will be neatly divided into a certain number of rounds per gun, and you can't use, say, a spare heavy pistol heat sink to buff your sniper rifle ammo; once it's assigned to a specific gun, it can't be applied to any other firearm.
** The M-920 Cain heavy weapon uses mass effect technology to propel a 25-gram slug to 5 km/s speed, which helps the explosion greatly, as said by the lore. If you actually use the weapon in game, the slug travels very slow, it's surprising [[ArtisticLicensePhysics the slug doesn't fall]] to the ground after a while, luckily the weapon's power is not affected.
* ''VideoGame/MassEffect3'':
** During the final confrontation with [[spoiler:Kai Leng at the Cerberus Base, it's possible to blow him into nice, meaty chunks using an incredibly powerful rifle (the Black Widow is good for this)]]. Even though he's supposedly been blown apart, he magically appears alive and well in the following cutscene when he struggles to stand up.
** Shepard will always end up holding an unmodified Carnifex pistol with unlimited ammo in his/her hand after [[spoiler:Harbinger destroys the team running towards the Conduit]], even if you never bothered to equip him/her with one or if you had a modified Carnifex. Of course, given the state of his/her armor, it might be a bit optimistic to expect his/her weapons to be useable -- it might well have been somebody else's Carnifex.
** The player can listen to the problems of various people onboard the Citadel, and do assorted sidequests for them, which will reward you with resources and increased combat readiness values. The problem is that the effects are immediate, so the dialog can get a bit weird. When you recover a fossil of a Krogan war mount that has been extinct for 2000 years and talk to the guy who wants it that you've got one in your cargo bay, he thanks you for your trouble, and then a few seconds later, you overhear him saying they've cloned the things and the Krogan are currently riding them into battle.
** Much like the previous game, Shepard and his/her squadmates will always be seen carrying either an Avenger assault rifle or Predator pistol in cutscenes. This can get taken to absurd lengths - during the Grissom Academy mission, Shepard runs into the room where Jack and the students are hiding, and fires on a mech while using an Avenger and having up to ''five'' weapons stored on his/her back. This became official policy after complaints about some cutscenes in ''Mass Effect 2'' doing weird things by depicting Shepard's actual loadout, such as taking a mercenary's Shuriken, having it transform into a Locust in Shep's hands, and back into a Shuriken when handed back. At least as the various default weapons are Alliance standard issue, there's an excuse for them being everywhere.
** When Kai Leng gets away, even if your Shepard is a Vanguard who has the ability to nearly instantly teleport to any enemy, he is never shown doing so. Nor do your companions (or yourself) cast Stasis, which would freeze him in his tracks.
** Allies can be killed by insta-kill moves by certain enemies like the Brute, Banshee, Atlas and Phantom. These insta-kill moves are pretty brutal and the fact that in the multiplayer segment they prevent you from being revived by medi-gel or team mates coming to your aide. These moves range from being picked up by a hulking mech and being crushed to having a large, razor sharp hand thrust all the way through your chest. This won't stop your squad from simply standing back up as soon as the fighting has stopped and walking around as if nothing happened.
** If you confront the Virmire Survivor without building up trust between them and Shepard, and are forced to kill them, they succumbing to a pistol shot, nevermind that they are likely wearing armor and survived an attack from a [[spoiler: powerful gynoid]] prior to that.
** Despite [[EncyclopediaExposita the Codex]] treating space battles relatively realistically, every space battle depicted in cutscenes is the StandardStarshipScuffle. Not too noticeable in the first two games, but it goes all out in the third, with ships always [[SeeTheWhitesOfTheirEyes engaging in visual ranges]] (even dreadnoughts, who are established that if they're engaging at anything less than several thousand kilometers something has gone seriously wrong), no-one uses [[FrickinLaserBeams GARDIAN lasers]] to defend themselves against fighter craft despite them being on every vessel, fighters themselves always go OldSchoolDogfighting even though they're armed with missiles, and although Thanix cannons are supposed to be everywhere no ship is shown using them.
** In 2, you face [[MightyGlacier YMIR mechs]], which can be turned to your side with the AI Hacking power. In 3, you fight ATLAS mechs, which are basically the same as [=YMIRs=], but with a human pilot. The Overload and AI Hacking powers were combined into one called Sabotage...which still turns the Atlas and it's human pilot against its allies (this could be justified in that you are hacking into the controls, with the human pilot doing what he can to override your hacking). To compound the idiocy, if Shepard kills the pilot by cracking the cockpit and climbs in, enemy Engineers will heal it, as if they haven't noticed their foe is piloting it[[note]]or perhaps they hope that appeasing Shepard will keep them alive a little longer[[/note]]. And to top it off, the Leviathan DLC introduces Titan ADS, an "old military mech" used for diving found in a crashed freighter that's just a reskinned Atlas, even though those are supposed to be a new, top of the line Cerberus development. [[note]]One could argue that the Codex doesn't explicitly say they're entirely new, but if the Titan is so ubiquitous that a random freighter could have one, one wonders where they were in the previous game.[[/note]]
1st Sep '17 2:28:51 PM Shadoboy
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** In ''III'', Arthas sells his soul in exchange for power by picking up the runeblade Frostmourne. In spite of this however, he goes from being a level 10 Paladin in the last human mission to being a level 1 Death Knight in the first undead level, leading to a massive drop in in-game stats. Similarly, Illidan also sells his soul for power by consuming the Skull of Gul'dan. When he shows up later in ''Frozen Throne'', his appearance has changed and he boasts about how powerful he is... but his stats aren't any different from that of a typical level 10 Demon Hunter.

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** In ''III'', Arthas sells his soul in exchange for power by picking up the runeblade Frostmourne. In spite of this however, he goes from being a level 10 Paladin in the last human mission to being a level 1 Death Knight in the first undead level, leading to a massive drop in in-game stats.stats, including inexpicably losing Frostmourne's [[InfinityPlusOneSword Chaos Damage]]. Similarly, Illidan also sells his soul for power by consuming the Skull of Gul'dan. When he shows up later in ''Frozen Throne'', his appearance has changed and he boasts about how powerful he is... but his stats aren't any different from that of a typical level 10 Demon Hunter.
1st Sep '17 6:20:34 AM CosmicFerret
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* In ''VideoGame/JusticeLeagueHeroesTheFlash'', TheFlash has to go from city to city to defend each while the resident hero is occupied fighting the robot invasion elsewhere across the world (for example, {{Superman}} can't be reached, so Flash goes to Metropolis). You can then summon the "busy" hero to help you in battle anyway.

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* In ''VideoGame/JusticeLeagueHeroesTheFlash'', TheFlash Franchise/TheFlash has to go from city to city to defend each while the resident hero is occupied fighting the robot invasion elsewhere across the world (for example, {{Superman}} can't be reached, so Flash goes to Metropolis). You can then summon the "busy" hero to help you in battle anyway.
31st Aug '17 12:30:06 PM digiman619
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*** It's possible to turn into a Vampire. If you want to stop, there is a ritual to rid yourself of Vampirism, but it involves a filled Black Soul Gem[[note]]Drawing the spirits of fallen foes into soul gems is required to enchant arms and armor.[[/note]], meaning you'll have to kill a human/elf/argonian/other sapient being in order to cure yourself. The narrative plays this as a horribly evil act, treating this as a terrible price to pay for freedom. If you do any enchanting, however, chances are you have a filled Black Soul Gem on you, as you are attacked by bandits (and are thus forced to kill them in self-defense) ''constantly.''

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*** It's possible to turn into a Vampire. If you want to stop, there is a ritual to rid yourself of Vampirism, but it involves a filled Black Soul Gem[[note]]Drawing the spirits of fallen foes into soul gems is required to enchant arms and armor.[[/note]], meaning you'll have to kill a human/elf/argonian/other another sapient being in order to cure yourself. The narrative plays this as a horribly evil act, treating this as a terrible price to pay for freedom. If you do any enchanting, however, chances are you have a filled Black Soul Gem on you, as you are attacked by bandits (and are thus forced to kill them in self-defense) ''constantly.''
31st Aug '17 4:50:17 AM HalcyonDayz
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* [[VideoGame/DeadRising2 The sequel]] is even more jarring, as the gameplay is still the wacky, [[MacGuyvering build-your-own-weapons]] and dress like a lunatic style... which clashes ''heavily'' with the main plot, and Chuck's tender interactions with his daughter in particular.

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* [[VideoGame/DeadRising2 The sequel]] is even more jarring, as the gameplay is still the wacky, [[MacGuyvering [[MacGyvering build-your-own-weapons]] and dress like a lunatic style... which clashes ''heavily'' with the main plot, and Chuck's tender interactions with his daughter in particular.
31st Aug '17 4:45:54 AM HalcyonDayz
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* Cyberpunk games tend to have a problem with hacking. To keep the game fun, hacking is usually modelled cinematically: you can hack any system if you're a sufficiently good hacker and can spend a short time frantically typing. This works in films when there's a single protagonist, but in a tabletop game, NPC hackers will be following the same rules. This usually results in PCs desperately avoiding using any form of technology because it is so easily hacked, yielding the opposite of cyberpunk.

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* Cyberpunk games tend to have a problem with hacking. To keep the game fun, hacking is usually modelled cinematically: you can hack any system if you're a sufficiently good hacker and can spend a short time frantically typing. This works in films when there's a single protagonist, but in a tabletop game, NPC hackers will be following the same rules. This usually results in PCs [=PCs=] desperately avoiding using any form of technology because it is so easily hacked, yielding the opposite of cyberpunk.



** Several of the Grand Theft Auto games have missions involving recurring [[NonPlayerCharacter NPCs]] that end with you dropping them off somewhere and them leaving. During the brief period after dropping them off, when the mission is considered complete but before they actually disappear, you can do anything to them, including killing them, and nothing will happen - and they'll be back for the next mission. This becomes surreal when Trevor can thank a lady for a date by blasting her in the face with a shotgun after dropping her off, causing her to collapse in a pool of her own blood, and she'll not only be fine next time but won't remember it and will date him again.

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** Several of the Grand Theft Auto games have missions involving recurring [[NonPlayerCharacter NPCs]] NonPlayerCharacter that end with you dropping them off somewhere and them leaving. During the brief period after dropping them off, when the mission is considered complete but before they actually disappear, you can do anything to them, including killing them, and nothing will happen - and they'll be back for the next mission. This becomes surreal when Trevor can thank a lady for a date by blasting her in the face with a shotgun after dropping her off, causing her to collapse in a pool of her own blood, and she'll not only be fine next time but won't remember it and will date him again.
27th Aug '17 11:08:28 AM nombretomado
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* During one cutscene of ''AtelierIris,'' TheStoic swordsman asks to talk with the main character while the cook is making dinner. They go out to the woods where the swordsman [[HopelessBossFight "tests"]] the main's progress by beating him within an inch of his life. They then return to have dinner, and the other characters calmly ask what the two were up to. They accept the response that they were "taking a walk", and no one seems to notice any distress or injury from the character. Given the [[HyperactiveMetabolism various common ways]] one can heal in the game, and the fact that the main character is an alchemist who can produce {{healing potion}}s, one might generously think that perhaps he healed himself to avoid worrying his friends... except that after the cutscene, he's still at 1 HP. Apparently in this world, no one bleeds when they get hit by swords.

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* During one cutscene of ''AtelierIris,'' ''VideoGame/AtelierIrisEternalMana'', TheStoic swordsman asks to talk with the main character while the cook is making dinner. They go out to the woods where the swordsman [[HopelessBossFight "tests"]] the main's progress by beating him within an inch of his life. They then return to have dinner, and the other characters calmly ask what the two were up to. They accept the response that they were "taking a walk", and no one seems to notice any distress or injury from the character. Given the [[HyperactiveMetabolism various common ways]] one can heal in the game, and the fact that the main character is an alchemist who can produce {{healing potion}}s, one might generously think that perhaps he healed himself to avoid worrying his friends... except that after the cutscene, he's still at 1 HP. Apparently in this world, no one bleeds when they get hit by swords.
1st Aug '17 8:15:44 PM ImpudentInfidel
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** In one cutscene in Episode II, we see [[TheSquad half a dozen]] or so [[SpaceMarines Terran Marines]] kill at least that many hydralisks before succumbing to their superior numbers; in gameplay Marines are far weaker. Note also that Ghosts are never seen wearing any kind of helmet or breathing apparatus, despite their routine deployment in hard vacuum (probably not a case of [[BatmanCanBreatheInSpace Batman Can Breathe In Space]] because cutscene Ghosts are always shown in an atmosphere or pressurized ship).

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** In one cutscene in Episode II, we see [[TheSquad half a dozen]] or so [[SpaceMarines Terran Marines]] kill at least that many hydralisks before succumbing to their superior numbers; in gameplay Marines are far weaker.weaker, and hydralisks have ranged attacks instead of relying on their claws. Note also that Ghosts are never seen wearing any kind of helmet or breathing apparatus, despite their routine deployment in hard vacuum (probably not a case of [[BatmanCanBreatheInSpace Batman Can Breathe In Space]] because cutscene Ghosts are always shown in an atmosphere or pressurized ship).
21st Jul '17 5:43:22 PM Malady
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* ''VideoGame/AVeryLongRopeToTheTopOfTheSky'', being an EasternRPG, lets you use magic abilities in battle. However, magic is never mentioned or referenced in the story except in regards to one subplot that happened in the distant past. This gets particularly egregious when one villain dismisses your magical powerhouse as a weak old man, even though, if magic is commonplace, he should know that frail old men can still be legitimate threats.
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