History Main / FunnyAnimalAnatomy

21st Jun '17 12:26:52 PM BunnyStar
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* AppropriateAnimalAttire
10th Jun '17 7:57:28 PM PrincessPandaTrope
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SubTrope of ArtMajorBiology.

to:

SubTrope of ArtMajorBiology.
ArtMajorBiology. May result in InformedSpecies.


Added DiffLines:

* The anthropomorphic fish in ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' have legs, to make them more anthropomorphic.
6th Jun '17 3:17:26 PM Sugao
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* An orange tomcat with black ears in one ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' cartoon has an unusually long muzzle for a small cat and a muzzle shape that would be more appropriate for a lion.

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* An orange tomcat with black ears in one ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' cartoon has an unusually long muzzle for a small cat and a muzzle shape that would be more appropriate for a lion. Not to mention, ''tom''cats are generally either orange ''or'' black, due to having only one X chromosome (females are normally the only calicos, barring point mutations and polyploidy).
11th May '17 8:23:53 PM albertonykus
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Added DiffLines:

* Ruminants are almost always depicted with upper incisors, even though they lack these in real life.
11th May '17 2:52:50 PM schoi30
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** Alligators are often drawn with narrower jaws than those of real alligators, often shaped more like a crocodile's.



* Alligators are often drawn with v-shaped snouts and interlocking teeth just like crocodiles, and conversely crocodiles will often be depicted with a gator-like overbite. However, this may be because of artists confusing the two crocodilians.

to:

* Alligators are often drawn with v-shaped snouts and interlocking teeth just like crocodiles, and conversely crocodiles will often be depicted with a gator-like overbite. However, this may be because of artists confusing the two crocodilians.
10th Apr '17 2:29:41 PM PDL
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* Koalas are always drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.

to:

* Koalas are always drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.life[[note]]each limb has 5 digits, but the first and second oppose the other three[[/note]].
10th Apr '17 2:17:49 PM schoi30
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* Koalas are often drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.

to:

* Koalas are often always drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.
25th Mar '17 9:14:49 PM schoi30
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:List of Common Examples in Media]]
* Critters which are faceless, or have their features in non-standard human places, usually have a full face drawn somewhere else:
** Octopuses almost always will have faces -- complete with CartoonyEyes -- placed on their huge foreheads. As a result, what appears to be a real octopus' mouth [[VaginaDentata becomes a cartoon octopus' anus!]]
** The same happens to squids, but to a lesser extent, since they normally keep their eyes where they originally are (near the tentacles).
** Starfish usually have faces (eyes and mouth) on the back of their bodies.
* Not only birds, but sometimes also toads, bugs, earthworms, et cetera... will have teeth. Especially {{egregious}} when dealing with invertebrates.
* Insects and arachnids also sometimes have anthro mouths, teeth ''and'' chelicera (if an arachnid) or mandibles (if an insect), making one wonder what those are for, if the teeth will hold and cut the food anyway.
** They are also usually depicted with only two eyes (in RealLife, insects usually have five eyes and arachnids usually have eight eyes, although the additional ones are smaller)
* The borderline [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom furry]] {{Squick}}y case of "male cows". [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Yes, bulls with udders.]]
* It's a recurring joke in cartoons for animals, walking upright, being [[AnimalsLackAttributes mysteriously devoid of any genitalia whatsoever]] (especially with males). In a similar way, cartoon animals almost always lack an anus, even when it should be clearly visible below the tail.
* Bird beaks are pliable, like human lips. Or [[WesternAnimation/AnimalCrackers worse]], they're like noses with a normal mouth underneath.
** Similar to the above, mammalian snouts are commonly portrayed as simply noses with a normal mouth underneath. This is especially common with pig snouts or dog muzzles.
* A lot of dogs and other animals with non-retractable claws tend to be drawn without their claws showing in cartoons. Only cats (except cheetahs, which have semi-retractile claws), [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossa_(animal) fossas]], and many civet species have fully retractable claws. If the animal has non-retractable or semi-retractable claws, they should be showing at least a little bit. But in cartoonland, most animals with claws are drawn without them showing, even those with non-retractable claws.
** In the case of birds, ducks, geese, and other web-footed birds are the most likely to be drawn without claws showing.
** On a related note: In a lot of cartoons, comics, and video games, humans and other primates tend to be drawn without their fingernails or toenails showing.
** And speaking of cat claws, many works depict feline claws as being brown or black in colour, while in reality all feline species have white claws.
* Even though snakes and fish (except sharks) can't blink in RealLife, they are shown being able to blink in cartoons anyway.
* Owls and most of other birds can't move their eyes (Great Comorants are an exception), but this fact is ignored in cartoons and they are able to move their eyes just like humans.
* Cartoon animals tend to be drawn with a head, muzzle, beak, or bill shape that is different from what it is in real life:
** Ducks are usually drawn with bills that are wider than that of real ducks, often being as wide as a real platypus's bill.
** Larger cat species are often drawn with longer muzzles than what they would have in real life, about as long as that of a dog with an average muzzle length, especially in older cartoons. Big cats may have longer muzzles than small cats, but their muzzles aren't as long as that of a mesocephalic (of normal muzzle length) dog.
** Rats and even mice are sometimes drawn with muzzles as long as that of dogs with an average muzzle length, longer than that of a real rat or a real mouse.
* Cartoon rabbits and hares are usually drawn with noses shaped more like either cat noses and even dog noses than real rabbit noses.
** Cartoon reindeer are usually drawn with noses like dogs' noses. White-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, and mule deer may have noses that look somewhat like a dog's nose, but reindeer/caribou, moose, and elk noses look nothing like dog noses.
** A lot of cartoon tomcats, especially BuffoonishTomcat[=s=], are drawn large, bulbous noses.
** Much like rabbits, cartoon rodents are often drawn with noses looking more like cat noses or dog noses. Particularly squirrels and chipmunks, which both have noses looking not much different than those of rabbits.
* Beavers are usually drawn with white teeth even though real beavers have yellow or orange teeth.
* Cheetahs are quite often depicted with a leopard style rosette fur pattern while lacking their characteristic facial "tear" stripes. This is probably due to artists being more familiar with leopards (and jaguars, which do resemble them) and erroneously generalizing their characteristics. Real cheetahs have solid round black spots and stripes on their tails and sides of the muzzle. Although king cheetahs, a color variation of cheetah, are known to have rosettes.
** Similarly, leopards and jaguars are sometimes drawn with solid spots, with the latter often lacking dots in the center of their rosettes which distinguishes them from leopards.
* [[AnimalGenderBender Female reindeer are often portrayed as being antlerless, while males retain theirs all-year long.]] In real life, both genders have antlers (and therefore the ''only'' deer species to have that quality), and that only castrated males will retain their antlers even in the winter.
* Rabbits are often drawn with footpads, which real rabbits do not have.
* Most animated giraffes are portrayed with pink tongues. In real life, a giraffe's tongue is black. Also, giraffes in animation are often drawn with necks longer and more flexible than those in real life.
* Most cartoon elephants will often appear to be Indian elephants even in African settings. They will also only have three toes on each foot.
* Monkeys appearing in most animated works will almost always be depicted with prehensile tails (a trait exclusive to monkeys living in the Western Hemisphere), especially if the monkeys are of the "generic" type as opposed to a specific species, even if said works take place in the Eastern Hemisphere.
** Also, monkeys appearing in many animated works are often depicted with longer arms than legs (In RealLife, monkeys usually have legs that are a little longer than their arms.) and a stance more like an ape than like any real monkey, especially if they are of the "generic" type.
* Cartoon parrots, toucans, woodpeckers, and cuckoos will always be drawn with feet that have three claws in the front and a fourth in the back, instead of two claws in the front and two in the back. Alternatively, they may have two toes in front and only one in the back (which is accurate at least for the three-toed woodpecker).
** Ostriches may be drawn with three or four toes on their feet like most birds, when real ostriches have only two. And when they do get portrayed with two toes, they will always have a claw on each toe instead of just one on the larger inner toe.
* Snakes in animated works will all be portrayed as egg-layers. Including vipers, rattlesnakes, garter snakes, boas, and anacondas, despite the fact these snakes are live-bearers in real life.
* Cartoon octopuses and squids often have a siphon on each side of their heads as if they are ears. Real cephalopods only have a single siphon. In Japanese media they will have their siphon placed underneath their eyes as if it was some sort of tube-like mouth.
* Most animated passerine birds (unless they are [[CorvidTropes corvids]]) will always either look like sparrows or be colored like them.
* Most animated fish (not counting the [[NoCartoonFish realistic-looking ones]]) will look absolutely ''nothing'' like actual fish species.
* Many cartoon pelicans have oversized beak pouches even when they're empty.
* [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology Many prehistoric animals are portrayed inaccurately.]] For example, many theropods are portrayed having pronated hands when the palms actually faced each other like a person about to clap, plant-eating dinosaurs are shown having elephantine feet when this wasn't the case in real life, feathered dinosaurs like ''[[RaptorAttack Velociraptor]]'' are shown as being covered in scales, [[PteroSoarer pterosaurs are shown as bipedal and scaly when actually they were quadrupeds covered in hair-like pycnofibres]], plesiosaurs are depicted with snake-like necks instead of rigid necks with limited flexibility, basal synapsids like ''Dimetrodon'' will have mostly reptilian features despite being ancestral to mammals, and mammoths will be all be portrayed as woolly regardless of species. In many cases, this can be because [[ScienceMarchesOn the information was not available at the time.]]
* Whiskers, common to many mammals, are details that can disappear with simplified art, but for some unfathomable cultural reason they are considered a necessary identifying feature of animals like cats, rabbits, mice, and rats more than other animals that have them, such as dogs and foxes. Often this is the easiest way to tell cats from dogs in the same work.
* Human characters in some shows and comics are drawn with hands that look like paws, in other words, their fingers don't taper the way real human fingers do. Though, that could be because some artists have a hard time drawing hands.
* Koalas are often drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.
* Anteaters tend to have mouths at the base of their snouts, instead of at the tip. Their snouts will also be flexible like an elephant's trunk. Anteaters will also be portrayed with large ears, possibly due to being confused with aardvarks.
* Alligators are often drawn with v-shaped snouts and interlocking teeth just like crocodiles, and conversely crocodiles will often be depicted with a gator-like overbite. However, this may be because of artists confusing the two crocodilians.
* Sperm whales are often depicted with a wider head, shovel-like jaws instead of narrow jaws, upper teeth, belly lines similar to those of baleen whales, and the blowhole located on the top of the head instead of the left side of the snout.
* Vampire bats often suffer the same problem as pterosaurs: being depicted as bipedal instead of quadrupedal like in real life.
* Orcas sometimes have their eyes on their eyespots.
* [[SmellySkunk Skunks]], if their odor is brought up at all, will often produce it from their tail rather than the glands near their rear, often as a way to avoid {{Squick}} and having things devolve into ToiletHumor.
* Chameleons are often drawn without the joined eyelids that cover most part of their eyes.
* Many cartoon hippos are drawn with square or marshmallow-shaped canines that sometimes protrude out of the mouth instead of being hidden underneath lips.
** Similarly, many rodents are often portrayed with their incisors exposed. Some like gophers and naked mole rats have mouths like this, but others like rats and squirrels have their teeth hidden. Lagomorphs are also portrayed with their incisors sticking out, even though they shouldn't be visible.
* Cartoon rhinos will sometimes appear to be Indian rhinos, with the single horn being as long as the front horn of an African species.
* Frogs and toads will be shown being able to move their heads, despite having very short and stiff necks.
* Cartoon praying mantises will always be drawn with their front legs ending at the sickle-like tibia, usually lacking the feet at the end.
* Leeches are usually drawn with a LampreyMouth, even though real leeches have a much less pronounced mouth. Alternatively, they may have a tube-like mouth instead.
* Bivalve shells almost always [[ClamTrap function as mouths]], sometimes with tongues inside of them or even having their soft bodies posing as tongues.
[[/folder]]

----
25th Mar '17 8:57:57 PM schoi30
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to:

!!Examples



[[folder:List of Common Examples in Media]]
* Critters which are faceless, or have their features in non-standard human places, usually have a full face drawn somewhere else:
** Octopuses almost always will have faces -- complete with CartoonyEyes -- placed on their huge foreheads. As a result, what appears to be a real octopus' mouth [[VaginaDentata becomes a cartoon octopus' anus!]]
** The same happens to squids, but to a lesser extent, since they normally keep their eyes where they originally are (near the tentacles).
** Starfish usually have faces (eyes and mouth) on the back of their bodies.
* Not only birds, but sometimes also toads, bugs, earthworms, et cetera... will have teeth. Especially {{egregious}} when dealing with invertebrates.
* Insects and arachnids also sometimes have anthro mouths, teeth ''and'' chelicera (if an arachnid) or mandibles (if an insect), making one wonder what those are for, if the teeth will hold and cut the food anyway.
** They are also usually depicted with only two eyes (in RealLife, insects usually have five eyes and arachnids usually have eight eyes, although the additional ones are smaller)
* The borderline [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom furry]] {{Squick}}y case of "male cows". [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Yes, bulls with udders.]]
* It's a recurring joke in cartoons for animals, walking upright, being [[AnimalsLackAttributes mysteriously devoid of any genitalia whatsoever]] (especially with males). In a similar way, cartoon animals almost always lack an anus, even when it should be clearly visible below the tail.
* Bird beaks are pliable, like human lips. Or [[WesternAnimation/AnimalCrackers worse]], they're like noses with a normal mouth underneath.
** Similar to the above, mammalian snouts are commonly portrayed as simply noses with a normal mouth underneath. This is especially common with pig snouts or dog muzzles.
* A lot of dogs and other animals with non-retractable claws tend to be drawn without their claws showing in cartoons. Only cats (except cheetahs, which have semi-retractile claws), [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossa_(animal) fossas]], and many civet species have fully retractable claws. If the animal has non-retractable or semi-retractable claws, they should be showing at least a little bit. But in cartoonland, most animals with claws are drawn without them showing, even those with non-retractable claws.
** In the case of birds, ducks, geese, and other web-footed birds are the most likely to be drawn without claws showing.
** On a related note: In a lot of cartoons, comics, and video games, humans and other primates tend to be drawn without their fingernails or toenails showing.
** And speaking of cat claws, many works depict feline claws as being brown or black in colour, while in reality all feline species have white claws.
* Even though snakes and fish (except sharks) can't blink in RealLife, they are shown being able to blink in cartoons anyway.
* Owls and most of other birds can't move their eyes (Great Comorants are an exception), but this fact is ignored in cartoons and they are able to move their eyes just like humans.
* Cartoon animals tend to be drawn with a head, muzzle, beak, or bill shape that is different from what it is in real life:
** Ducks are usually drawn with bills that are wider than that of real ducks, often being as wide as a real platypus's bill.
** Larger cat species are often drawn with longer muzzles than what they would have in real life, about as long as that of a dog with an average muzzle length, especially in older cartoons. Big cats may have longer muzzles than small cats, but their muzzles aren't as long as that of a mesocephalic (of normal muzzle length) dog.
** Rats and even mice are sometimes drawn with muzzles as long as that of dogs with an average muzzle length, longer than that of a real rat or a real mouse.
* Cartoon rabbits and hares are usually drawn with noses shaped more like either cat noses and even dog noses than real rabbit noses.
** Cartoon reindeer are usually drawn with noses like dogs' noses. White-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, and mule deer may have noses that look somewhat like a dog's nose, but reindeer/caribou, moose, and elk noses look nothing like dog noses.
** A lot of cartoon tomcats, especially BuffoonishTomcat[=s=], are drawn large, bulbous noses.
** Much like rabbits, cartoon rodents are often drawn with noses looking more like cat noses or dog noses. Particularly squirrels and chipmunks, which both have noses looking not much different than those of rabbits.
* Beavers are usually drawn with white teeth even though real beavers have yellow or orange teeth.
* Cheetahs are quite often depicted with a leopard style rosette fur pattern while lacking their characteristic facial "tear" stripes. This is probably due to artists being more familiar with leopards (and jaguars, which do resemble them) and erroneously generalizing their characteristics. Real cheetahs have solid round black spots and stripes on their tails and sides of the muzzle. Although king cheetahs, a color variation of cheetah, are known to have rosettes.
** Similarly, leopards and jaguars are sometimes drawn with solid spots, with the latter often lacking dots in the center of their rosettes which distinguishes them from leopards.
* [[AnimalGenderBender Female reindeer are often portrayed as being antlerless, while males retain theirs all-year long.]] In real life, both genders have antlers (and therefore the ''only'' deer species to have that quality), and that only castrated males will retain their antlers even in the winter.
* Rabbits are often drawn with footpads, which real rabbits do not have.
* Most animated giraffes are portrayed with pink tongues. In real life, a giraffe's tongue is black. Also, giraffes in animation are often drawn with necks longer and more flexible than those in real life.
* Most cartoon elephants will often appear to be Indian elephants even in African settings. They will also only have three toes on each foot.
* Monkeys appearing in most animated works will almost always be depicted with prehensile tails (a trait exclusive to monkeys living in the Western Hemisphere), especially if the monkeys are of the "generic" type as opposed to a specific species, even if said works take place in the Eastern Hemisphere.
** Also, monkeys appearing in many animated works are often depicted with longer arms than legs (In RealLife, monkeys usually have legs that are a little longer than their arms.) and a stance more like an ape than like any real monkey, especially if they are of the "generic" type.
* Cartoon parrots, toucans, woodpeckers, and cuckoos will always be drawn with feet that have three claws in the front and a fourth in the back, instead of two claws in the front and two in the back. Alternatively, they may have two toes in front and only one in the back (which is accurate at least for the three-toed woodpecker).
** Ostriches may be drawn with three or four toes on their feet like most birds, when real ostriches have only two. And when they do get portrayed with two toes, they will always have a claw on each toe instead of just one on the larger inner toe.
* Snakes in animated works will all be portrayed as egg-layers. Including vipers, rattlesnakes, garter snakes, boas, and anacondas, despite the fact these snakes are live-bearers in real life.
* Cartoon octopuses and squids often have a siphon on each side of their heads as if they are ears. Real cephalopods only have a single siphon. In Japanese media they will have their siphon placed underneath their eyes as if it was some sort of tube-like mouth.
* Most animated passerine birds (unless they are [[CorvidTropes corvids]]) will always either look like sparrows or be colored like them.
* Most animated fish (not counting the [[NoCartoonFish realistic-looking ones]]) will look absolutely ''nothing'' like actual fish species.
* Many cartoon pelicans have oversized beak pouches even when they're empty.
* [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology Many prehistoric animals are portrayed inaccurately.]] For example, many theropods are portrayed having pronated hands when the palms actually faced each other like a person about to clap, plant-eating dinosaurs are shown having elephantine feet when this wasn't the case in real life, feathered dinosaurs like ''[[RaptorAttack Velociraptor]]'' are shown as being covered in scales, [[PteroSoarer pterosaurs are shown as bipedal and scaly when actually they were quadrupeds covered in hair-like pycnofibres]], plesiosaurs are depicted with snake-like necks instead of rigid necks with limited flexibility, basal synapsids like ''Dimetrodon'' will have mostly reptilian features despite being ancestral to mammals, and mammoths will be all be portrayed as woolly regardless of species. In many cases, this can be because [[ScienceMarchesOn the information was not available at the time.]]
* Whiskers, common to many mammals, are details that can disappear with simplified art, but for some unfathomable cultural reason they are considered a necessary identifying feature of animals like cats, rabbits, mice, and rats more than other animals that have them, such as dogs and foxes. Often this is the easiest way to tell cats from dogs in the same work.
* Human characters in some shows and comics are drawn with hands that look like paws, in other words, their fingers don't taper the way real human fingers do. Though, that could be because some artists have a hard time drawing hands.
* Koalas are often drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.
* Anteaters tend to have mouths at the base of their snouts, instead of at the tip. Their snouts will also be flexible like an elephant's trunk. Anteaters will also be portrayed with large ears, possibly due to being confused with aardvarks.
* Alligators are often drawn with v-shaped snouts and interlocking teeth just like crocodiles, and conversely crocodiles will often be depicted with a gator-like overbite. However, this may be because of artists confusing the two crocodilians.
* Sperm whales are often depicted with a wider head, shovel-like jaws instead of narrow jaws, upper teeth, belly lines similar to those of baleen whales, and the blowhole located on the top of the head instead of the left side of the snout.
* Vampire bats often suffer the same problem as pterosaurs: being depicted as bipedal instead of quadrupedal like in real life.
* Orcas sometimes have their eyes on their eyespots.
* [[SmellySkunk Skunks]], if their odor is brought up at all, will often produce it from their tail rather than the glands near their rear, often as a way to avoid {{Squick}} and having things devolve into ToiletHumor.
* Chameleons are often drawn without the joined eyelids that cover most part of their eyes.
* Many cartoon hippos are drawn with square or marshmallow-shaped canines that sometimes protrude out of the mouth instead of being hidden underneath lips.
** Similarly, many rodents are often portrayed with their incisors exposed. Some like gophers and naked mole rats have mouths like this, but others like rats and squirrels have their teeth hidden. Lagomorphs are also portrayed with their incisors sticking out, even though they shouldn't be visible.
* Cartoon rhinos will sometimes appear to be Indian rhinos, with the single horn being as long as the front horn of an African species.
* Frogs and toads will be shown being able to move their heads, despite having very short and stiff necks.
* Cartoon praying mantises will always be drawn with their front legs ending at the sickle-like tibia, usually lacking the feet at the end.
* Leeches are usually drawn with a LampreyMouth, even though real leeches have a much less pronounced mouth. Alternatively, they may have a tube-like mouth instead.
* Bivalve shells almost always [[ClamTrap function as mouths]], sometimes with tongues inside of them or even having their soft bodies posing as tongues.

to:

[[folder:List of Common Examples in Media]]
[[folder:Advertising]]
* Critters which are faceless, or have their features in non-standard human places, usually have a full face drawn somewhere else:
** Octopuses almost always will have faces -- complete with CartoonyEyes -- placed on their huge foreheads. As a result, what appears to be a real octopus' mouth [[VaginaDentata becomes a cartoon octopus' anus!]]
** The same happens to squids, but to a lesser extent, since they normally keep their eyes where they originally are (near
Creator/ChuckECheese the tentacles).
** Starfish usually have faces (eyes and mouth) on the back of their bodies.
* Not only birds, but sometimes also toads, bugs, earthworms, et cetera... will have teeth. Especially {{egregious}} when dealing with invertebrates.
* Insects and arachnids also sometimes have anthro mouths, teeth ''and'' chelicera (if an arachnid) or mandibles (if an insect), making one wonder what those are for, if the teeth will hold and cut the food anyway.
** They are also usually depicted with only two eyes (in RealLife, insects usually have five eyes and arachnids usually have eight eyes, although the additional ones are smaller)
* The borderline [[UsefulNotes/FurryFandom furry]] {{Squick}}y case of "male cows". [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Yes, bulls with udders.]]
* It's a recurring joke in cartoons for animals, walking upright, being [[AnimalsLackAttributes mysteriously devoid of any genitalia whatsoever]] (especially with males). In a similar way, cartoon animals almost always lack an anus, even when it should be clearly visible below the tail.
* Bird beaks are pliable, like human lips. Or [[WesternAnimation/AnimalCrackers worse]], they're like noses with a normal mouth underneath.
** Similar to the above, mammalian snouts are commonly portrayed as simply noses with a normal mouth underneath. This is especially common with pig snouts or dog muzzles.
* A lot of dogs and other animals with non-retractable claws tend to be drawn without their claws showing in cartoons. Only cats (except cheetahs, which have semi-retractile claws), [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fossa_(animal) fossas]], and many civet species have fully retractable claws. If the animal
mouse has non-retractable or semi-retractable claws, they should be showing at least a little bit. But in cartoonland, most animals with claws are drawn without them showing, even those with non-retractable claws.
** In the case of birds, ducks, geese, and other web-footed birds are the most likely to be drawn without claws showing.
** On a related note: In a lot of cartoons, comics, and video games, humans and other primates tend to be drawn without their fingernails or toenails showing.
** And speaking of cat claws, many works depict feline claws as being brown or black in colour, while in reality all feline species have white claws.
* Even though snakes and fish (except sharks) can't blink in RealLife, they are shown being able to blink in cartoons anyway.
* Owls and most of other birds can't move their eyes (Great Comorants are an exception), but this fact is ignored in cartoons and they are able to move their eyes just like humans.
* Cartoon animals tend to be drawn with a head, muzzle, beak, or bill shape that is different from what it is in real life:
** Ducks are usually drawn with bills that are wider than that of real ducks, often being as wide as a real platypus's bill.
** Larger cat species are often drawn with longer muzzles than what they would have in real life, about as long as that of a dog with an average muzzle length, especially in older cartoons. Big cats may have longer muzzles than small cats, but their muzzles aren't as long as that of a mesocephalic (of normal muzzle length) dog.
** Rats and even mice are sometimes drawn with muzzles as long as that of dogs with an average muzzle length, longer than that of a real rat or a real mouse.
* Cartoon rabbits and hares are usually drawn with noses
nose shaped more like either cat noses and even dog noses than real rabbit noses.
** Cartoon reindeer are usually drawn with noses like dogs' noses. White-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, and mule deer may have noses that look somewhat
a bit like a dog's nose, but reindeer/caribou, moose, and elk noses look nothing like dog noses.
** A lot of cartoon tomcats, especially BuffoonishTomcat[=s=], are drawn large, bulbous noses.
** Much like rabbits, cartoon rodents are often drawn with noses looking more like cat noses or dog noses. Particularly squirrels and chipmunks, which both have noses looking not much different than those of rabbits.
* Beavers are usually drawn with white teeth even though real beavers have yellow or orange teeth.
* Cheetahs are quite often depicted with a leopard style rosette fur pattern while lacking their characteristic facial "tear" stripes. This is probably due to artists being more familiar with leopards (and jaguars, which do resemble them) and erroneously generalizing their characteristics. Real cheetahs have solid round black spots and stripes on their tails and sides of the muzzle. Although king cheetahs, a color variation of cheetah, are known to have rosettes.
** Similarly, leopards and jaguars are sometimes drawn with solid spots, with the latter often lacking dots in the center of their rosettes which distinguishes them from leopards.
* [[AnimalGenderBender Female reindeer are often portrayed as being antlerless, while males retain theirs all-year long.]] In real life, both genders have antlers (and therefore the ''only'' deer species to have that quality), and that only castrated males will retain their antlers even in the winter.
* Rabbits are often drawn with footpads, which real rabbits do not have.
* Most animated giraffes are portrayed with pink tongues. In real life, a giraffe's tongue is black. Also, giraffes in animation are often drawn with necks longer and more flexible than those in real life.
* Most cartoon elephants will often appear to be Indian elephants even in African settings. They will also only have three toes on each foot.
* Monkeys appearing in most animated works will almost always be depicted with prehensile tails (a trait exclusive to monkeys living in the Western Hemisphere), especially if the monkeys are of the "generic" type as opposed to a specific species, even if said works take place in the Eastern Hemisphere.
** Also, monkeys appearing in many animated works are often depicted with longer arms than legs (In RealLife, monkeys usually have legs that are a little longer than their arms.) and a stance more like an ape than like any real monkey, especially if they are of the "generic" type.
* Cartoon parrots, toucans, woodpeckers, and cuckoos will always be drawn with feet that have three claws in the front and a fourth in the back, instead of two claws in the front and two in the back. Alternatively, they may have two toes in front and only one in the back (which is accurate at least for the three-toed woodpecker).
** Ostriches may be drawn with three or four toes on their feet like most birds, when real ostriches have only two. And when they do get portrayed with two toes, they will always have a claw on each toe instead of just one on the larger inner toe.
* Snakes in animated works will all be portrayed as egg-layers. Including vipers, rattlesnakes, garter snakes, boas, and anacondas, despite the fact these snakes are live-bearers in real life.
* Cartoon octopuses and squids often have a siphon on each side of their heads as if they are ears. Real cephalopods only have a single siphon. In Japanese media they will have their siphon placed underneath their eyes as if it was some sort of tube-like mouth.
* Most animated passerine birds (unless they are [[CorvidTropes corvids]]) will always either look like sparrows or be colored like them.
* Most animated fish (not counting the [[NoCartoonFish realistic-looking ones]]) will look absolutely ''nothing'' like actual fish species.
* Many cartoon pelicans have oversized beak pouches even when they're empty.
* [[ArtisticLicensePaleontology Many prehistoric animals are portrayed inaccurately.]] For example, many theropods are portrayed having pronated hands when the palms actually faced each other like a person about to clap, plant-eating dinosaurs are shown having elephantine feet when this wasn't the case in real life, feathered dinosaurs like ''[[RaptorAttack Velociraptor]]'' are shown as being covered in scales, [[PteroSoarer pterosaurs are shown as bipedal and scaly when actually they were quadrupeds covered in hair-like pycnofibres]], plesiosaurs are depicted with snake-like necks instead of rigid necks with limited flexibility, basal synapsids like ''Dimetrodon'' will have mostly reptilian features despite being ancestral to mammals, and mammoths will be all be portrayed as woolly regardless of species. In many cases, this can be because [[ScienceMarchesOn the information was not available at the time.]]
* Whiskers, common to many mammals, are details that can disappear with simplified art, but for some unfathomable cultural reason they are considered a necessary identifying feature of animals like cats, rabbits, mice, and rats more than other animals that have them, such as dogs and foxes. Often this is the easiest way to tell cats from dogs in the same work.
* Human characters in some shows and comics are drawn with hands that look like paws, in other words, their fingers don't taper the way real human fingers do. Though, that could be because some artists have a hard time drawing hands.
* Koalas are often drawn with only one thumb, when they have two in real life.
* Anteaters tend to have mouths at the base of their snouts, instead of at the tip. Their snouts will also be flexible like an elephant's trunk. Anteaters will also be portrayed with large ears, possibly due to being confused with aardvarks.
* Alligators are often drawn with v-shaped snouts and interlocking teeth just like crocodiles, and conversely crocodiles will often be depicted with a gator-like overbite. However, this may be because of artists confusing the two crocodilians.
* Sperm whales are often depicted with a wider head, shovel-like jaws instead of narrow jaws, upper teeth, belly lines similar to those of baleen whales, and the blowhole located on the top of the head instead of the left side of the snout.
* Vampire bats often suffer the same problem as pterosaurs: being depicted as bipedal instead of quadrupedal like in real life.
* Orcas sometimes have their eyes on their eyespots.
* [[SmellySkunk Skunks]], if their odor is brought up at all, will often produce it from their tail rather than the glands near their rear, often as a way to avoid {{Squick}} and having things devolve into ToiletHumor.
* Chameleons are often drawn without the joined eyelids that cover most part of their eyes.
* Many cartoon hippos are drawn with square or marshmallow-shaped canines that sometimes protrude out of the mouth instead of being hidden underneath lips.
** Similarly, many rodents are often portrayed with their incisors exposed. Some like gophers and naked mole rats have mouths like this, but others like rats and squirrels have their teeth hidden. Lagomorphs are also portrayed with their incisors sticking out, even though they shouldn't be visible.
* Cartoon rhinos will sometimes appear to be Indian rhinos, with the single horn being as long as the front horn of an African species.
* Frogs and toads will be shown being able to move their heads, despite having very short and stiff necks.
* Cartoon praying mantises will always be drawn with their front legs ending at the sickle-like tibia, usually lacking the feet at the end.
* Leeches are usually drawn with a LampreyMouth, even though real leeches have a much less pronounced mouth. Alternatively, they may have a tube-like mouth instead.
* Bivalve shells almost always [[ClamTrap function as mouths]], sometimes with tongues inside of them or even having their soft bodies posing as tongues.
koala's nose.



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!!Examples
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* Creator/ChuckECheese the mouse has a nose shaped a bit like a koala's nose.
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24th Mar '17 2:14:42 PM schoi30
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* Leeches are usually drawn with a LampreyMouth, even though real leeches have a much less pronounced mouth. Alternatively, they may have a sucker-like mouth instead.

to:

* Leeches are usually drawn with a LampreyMouth, even though real leeches have a much less pronounced mouth. Alternatively, they may have a sucker-like tube-like mouth instead.
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