History Main / FromHell

22nd Apr '14 7:57:04 AM Polkaface99
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* [[Comicbook/FromHell A comicbook]] by Creator/AlanMoore.
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* [[Comicbook/FromHell [[ComicBook/FromHell A comicbook]] comic book]] by Creator/AlanMoore.
8th Sep '13 11:18:12 AM erforce
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[[redirect:Comicbook/FromHell]]
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[[redirect:Comicbook/FromHell]]From Hell may refer to: * [[Comicbook/FromHell A comicbook]] by Creator/AlanMoore. * [[Film/FromHell Its film adaptation]], starring Creator/JohnnyDepp.
8th Sep '13 10:35:47 AM erforce
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[[quoteright:348:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/FromHell_4057.jpg]] [[caption-width-right:348:[[TabletopGame/{{Clue}} Dr. Gull, in the low rent apartment, with the Liston Knife]].]] -->"''[[TitleDrop From hell]]'' -->''Mr Lusk,\\ Sor\\ [[FingerInTheMail I send you half the kidne I took from one women]] [[StylisticSuck prasarved it for you tother piece I fried and ate it was very nise. I may send you the bloody knif that took it out if you only wate a whil longer]]'' -->''signed\\ Catch me when you can Mishter Lusk''" -->"It is beginning, Netley. Only just beginning. For better or worse, the twentieth century. I have delivered it." -->- Sir William Withey Gull ''From Hell'' is a comic book series written by AlanMoore, speculating about the identity of {{Jack the Ripper}}. The series was published in 10 volumes between 1991 and 1996, and an appendix, ''From Hell: The Dance of the Gull-Catchers'', was published in 1998. The entire series was collected in trade paperback, published by Eddie Campbell Comics in 1999. ''From Hell'' takes as its central premise Stephen Knight's theory that the Ripper murders were part of a conspiracy to conceal the birth of an illegitimate royal baby fathered by Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence. Moore himself has written that he found Knight's theory to be rather unlikely, but felt it would make a good story. It was adapted into a [[Film/FromHell film of the same title]] ([[InNameOnly and not much else]]) in 2001, starring JohnnyDepp as Inspector Abberline. ---- !! This Graphic Novel contains examples of: * AGodAmI: [[spoiler: In Gull's last moments of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] the hallucinations of a depraved, dying mind.]] * AncientConspiracy: One which goes even beyond the Freemasons and the Illuminati, and stretches back to the beginnings of Human Belief when Female worship was supplanted by Male worship. Gull sees the whole of Human History as being a conflict between Men and Women. * ArcWords: ** Several characters state that they "just made a little sound" at particularly overwhelming moments. ** "What is the fourth dimension?" * AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence: [[spoiler: Gull believes he is doing this near the end...only for a woman who may possibly be Mary Kelly to tell him to go back to hell.]] * BasedOnAGreatBigLie: Moore makes no secret of the fact that he doesn't really believe Knight's theory, but damned if it doesn't make for a great story. * BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: ** Gull sees his murders as a ritual binding the lunar or irrational influence on human minds. He succeeds, only to be horrified at the future, where people are surrounded by the fruits of the rational mind but feel no wonder at all. ** Not to mention QueenVictoria and the masons, who certainly didn't expect something so gruesome when they asked Gull to take care of their problem. * BlackEyesOfEvil: [[spoiler: Sir William Gull a.k.a Jack The Ripper show these for a moment]]. * BonusMaterial: Part of the experience of reading ''From Hell'' is going through the two appendices, one being an in-depth explanation of themes and scenes, the other being the ''Dance of The Gull Catchers'', a brief history of Ripperology. * UsefulNotes/BritishCoppers * TheBritishEmpire: Depicted as being in a state of decline, with references to General Gordon's death in the Mahdi uprisings. * ConnectTheDeaths * ConspiracyKitchenSink: Royal cover-up, Masonic involvement, Police complicity, ritualistic murder, Paganism, Time Travel and Baby Hitler. It's all here. * ContractOnTheHitman: The conspirators contemplate having William Gull killed when his mental illness reveals him as a liability. * ContrastMontage: The life of William Gull, Queen's surgeon, vs. the life of Mary Kelly, prostitute. * CrapsackWorld: Whitechapel is a pit of criminality, depravity and poverty. England is a decaying empire afflicted with corruption and weak rulers. Even our modern times are dull and banal. * ADateWithRosiePalms: A particularly tragic and depressing example, during which Netley has a brief moment of remorse and self-loathing at his part in Gull's murders. * DepravedHomosexual: Prince Albert's boyfriend, who [[JerkAss displays a misogynist attitude towards the death of the prostitutes]] and uses sex to distract the latter from the murders * DisposableSexWorker: Very much averted. All of the victims are given significant amounts of characterisation and the main characters definitely do not forget about their murders, even if the government does. ''From Hell'' is something of a {{Deconstruction}} of this trope. * DissonantSerenity: Part of what makes Gull so unnerving is his calm and dispassionate exterior. As he butchers his final victim, he conducts himself as if conducting... well... an autopsy. ** Campbell's subdued artwork, the rigid page layouts, the loose handwritten lettering and the time period all conspire to create a more or less constant illusion of serenity; observe for instance Abberline's apoplectic verbal assault on a fellow copper, carried out in what seems at first glance to be calm and reasonable tones for a full page, until we see the cop shivering and wiping the sweat from his face. * DoorStopper: The collected edition would probably kill you if it fell on your head. And it's a ''paperback''. * TheDragon: Gull for the royal family, with Netley as TheBrute * EagleEyeDetection * FakingTheDead: [[spoiler:The last chapter implies that Gull killed the wrong woman in place of Mary Kelly, who escaped to live a life of anonymity back home in Ireland. Or maybe not...]] * FaintingSeer: Robert Lees has dramatic seizures, complete with convulsions and cryptic phrases which he chokes out. * FramingTheGuiltyParty: Lees tries to frame Gull as Jack the Ripper, which turns out to be quite true. Lees actually had no idea that Gull was in any way connected. Lees was just trying to get revenge for an insult. * FunetikAksent * GainaxEnding: [[spoiler: The last chapter (not including the epilogue) features Gull going on an elaborate spiritual journey, traveling back and forth in time, before seemingly [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence reaching the source of all enlightenment...]] only to be confronted by a woman who may or may not be Mary Kelly fled to Ireland who tells him to go back to hell.]] * GeniusBruiser: Sir William performs some pretty impressive pouncing for a scholarly doctor and stroke victim in his seventies. * {{Gayngst}}: Prince Albert displays some * {{Hallucinations}}: These play a large part in Gull's story. Or maybe they are more than hallucinations? * InspiredBy: Alan Moore extrapolated the story from Stephen Knight's theory on the Ripper murders. The idea of conducting an "autopsy" of the period also stemmed from DouglasAdams's ''DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency'', in which to solve a crime holistically, one would need to solve the entire society in which it occurred. * HistoricalDomainCharacter: Apart from the central characters, most of whom are based on real people, a number of historical celebrities pop their heads in, from OscarWilde, to the Elephant Man, to Alan Moore favourite AleisterCrowley. * HumanoidAbomination: [[spoiler:Creator/WilliamBlake's perception of Gull's spirit.]] The vision inspires his painting, ''The Ghost of a Flea''. * InfoDump: An early chapter is basically Gull traveling around town with his sidekick lecturing him on the secret Masonic/pagan symbolism of London landmarks. * JackTheRipper: ...yup. * LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Nearly all of them drawn from real life. * MadDoctor: Gull, who begins to have hallucinations after a stroke, though he seems inclined to cruelty from early on. * MeaningfulName: In the second appendix, Moore points out that Gull is a word for a person easily fooled (from where we derive "gullible"). [[spoiler: Gull, of course, is fooled into believing he actually killed Mary Kelly. Twice.]] * MindScrew: ''"What is the fourth dimension?"'' * NeverSuicide: Needless to say, the police don't inquire too closely into the death of [[spoiler: Montague John Druitt]]. * OldFashionedCopper: Considering it's 1888, all of them, really. * OminousFog: It's Victorian London. It's always foggy. * PhonyPsychic: Robert Lees. He's making it all up. [[PropheciesAreAlwaysRight But it all came true anyway]]. * PoeticSerialKiller: Gull is a particularly disturbing example of this trope. * PoliceProcedural * PlatonicProstitution: Abberline's relationship with "Fair Emma". * PsychoForHire: Sir Wiilliam Gull. He's hired for his discretion, but turns out to be quite AxCrazy. * [[ViewersAreGeniuses Readers Are Geniuses]]: The work is teeming with references to historical figures and events, a lengthy exchange on fourth dimensional theory, psychogeography, Masonic ritual and Pagan mysticism and the Illuminati. Reading the appendix is not just recommended. It's a necessity. * TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: Gull delivers one to Lees, which ironically prompts Lees to try to frame him for the Ripper murders. Gull starts to deliver a real apocalyptic one to the Masonic Council before his dementia catches up with him and he trails off in confusion. * {{Reconstruction}}: ''From Hell'' deconstructs perceptions of the Victorian era in order to reconstruct them, showing where many of our 20th Century obsessions (detective fiction, sensationalist tabloid journalism, serial killers) originated. * ReverseWhodunnit: The Ripper's identity is revealed in the opening chapters. It's not so much a ''Whodunnit?'' as a ''Whydunnit?'' * UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard: The highest brass as well as a few grunts are a part of the conspiracy, some more willing than others. * ShoutOut: ''Dance of the Gull Catchers'' features Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell [[ItMakesSenseInContext carrying a pair of butterfly nets walking around outside a group of Ripperologists chasing after a gull with their own nets]] while Moore [[BreakingTheFourthWall looks out to the reader and goes]] [[LooneyTunes "Be vewy vewy quiet.]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny We'we hunting wipers!"]] * ShownTheirWork: The comics includes lengthy annotations section detailing the research he put into making the comic, and the truth (or not) behind the more fantastic elements. * SlasherSmile: The one which Gull flashes especially for Netley at the conclusion of their psychogeographical trip through London is horrible. * StylisticSuck: Gull and Netley's letter to the police. Gull has the barely literate Netley write it so as to protect himself. * TitleDrop: Gull very pointedly insists that Netley begin their letter, "From hell." * VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Nobody really knows the truth behind the Ripper murders. There are a lot more credible theories than the one presented in this story, though. Moore himself has openly stated that he doesn't believe a word of the theory he uses, but simply found it entertaining enough to build his work around and decided not to let the 'truth' get in the way of a good story. * VictorianLondon: The setting. * VillainsBlendInBetter: Inverted. When the killer briefly time-travels to the modern world, he is horrified by how soulless and banal everything is. * VomitingCop: George Godley, upon finding the corpse of Jack the Ripper's last victim. [[spoiler: Also Abberline once he discovers the full extent of the conspiracy.]] * VomitIndiscretionShot: Netley has an adverse reaction to Sir William Withey Gull's Walking Tour of London. * WifeHusbandry: Walter Sickert allegedly helped raise Alice Crook after her mother was lobotomized by Gull, then when she came of age fathered a child with her, said child being Joseph Gorman, the man who told Stephan Knight about the putative conspiracy theory that Moore based the comic on. * WrongSideOfTheTracks: Limehouse, Whitechapel. ----
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[[quoteright:348:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/FromHell_4057.jpg]] [[caption-width-right:348:[[TabletopGame/{{Clue}} Dr. Gull, in the low rent apartment, with the Liston Knife]].]] -->"''[[TitleDrop From hell]]'' -->''Mr Lusk,\\ Sor\\ [[FingerInTheMail I send you half the kidne I took from one women]] [[StylisticSuck prasarved it for you tother piece I fried and ate it was very nise. I may send you the bloody knif that took it out if you only wate a whil longer]]'' -->''signed\\ Catch me when you can Mishter Lusk''" -->"It is beginning, Netley. Only just beginning. For better or worse, the twentieth century. I have delivered it." -->- Sir William Withey Gull ''From Hell'' is a comic book series written by AlanMoore, speculating about the identity of {{Jack the Ripper}}. The series was published in 10 volumes between 1991 and 1996, and an appendix, ''From Hell: The Dance of the Gull-Catchers'', was published in 1998. The entire series was collected in trade paperback, published by Eddie Campbell Comics in 1999. ''From Hell'' takes as its central premise Stephen Knight's theory that the Ripper murders were part of a conspiracy to conceal the birth of an illegitimate royal baby fathered by Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence. Moore himself has written that he found Knight's theory to be rather unlikely, but felt it would make a good story. It was adapted into a [[Film/FromHell film of the same title]] ([[InNameOnly and not much else]]) in 2001, starring JohnnyDepp as Inspector Abberline. ---- !! This Graphic Novel contains examples of: * AGodAmI: [[spoiler: In Gull's last moments of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] the hallucinations of a depraved, dying mind.]] * AncientConspiracy: One which goes even beyond the Freemasons and the Illuminati, and stretches back to the beginnings of Human Belief when Female worship was supplanted by Male worship. Gull sees the whole of Human History as being a conflict between Men and Women. * ArcWords: ** Several characters state that they "just made a little sound" at particularly overwhelming moments. ** "What is the fourth dimension?" * AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence: [[spoiler: Gull believes he is doing this near the end...only for a woman who may possibly be Mary Kelly to tell him to go back to hell.]] * BasedOnAGreatBigLie: Moore makes no secret of the fact that he doesn't really believe Knight's theory, but damned if it doesn't make for a great story. * BeCarefulWhatYouWishFor: ** Gull sees his murders as a ritual binding the lunar or irrational influence on human minds. He succeeds, only to be horrified at the future, where people are surrounded by the fruits of the rational mind but feel no wonder at all. ** Not to mention QueenVictoria and the masons, who certainly didn't expect something so gruesome when they asked Gull to take care of their problem. * BlackEyesOfEvil: [[spoiler: Sir William Gull a.k.a Jack The Ripper show these for a moment]]. * BonusMaterial: Part of the experience of reading ''From Hell'' is going through the two appendices, one being an in-depth explanation of themes and scenes, the other being the ''Dance of The Gull Catchers'', a brief history of Ripperology. * UsefulNotes/BritishCoppers * TheBritishEmpire: Depicted as being in a state of decline, with references to General Gordon's death in the Mahdi uprisings. * ConnectTheDeaths * ConspiracyKitchenSink: Royal cover-up, Masonic involvement, Police complicity, ritualistic murder, Paganism, Time Travel and Baby Hitler. It's all here. * ContractOnTheHitman: The conspirators contemplate having William Gull killed when his mental illness reveals him as a liability. * ContrastMontage: The life of William Gull, Queen's surgeon, vs. the life of Mary Kelly, prostitute. * CrapsackWorld: Whitechapel is a pit of criminality, depravity and poverty. England is a decaying empire afflicted with corruption and weak rulers. Even our modern times are dull and banal. * ADateWithRosiePalms: A particularly tragic and depressing example, during which Netley has a brief moment of remorse and self-loathing at his part in Gull's murders. * DepravedHomosexual: Prince Albert's boyfriend, who [[JerkAss displays a misogynist attitude towards the death of the prostitutes]] and uses sex to distract the latter from the murders * DisposableSexWorker: Very much averted. All of the victims are given significant amounts of characterisation and the main characters definitely do not forget about their murders, even if the government does. ''From Hell'' is something of a {{Deconstruction}} of this trope. * DissonantSerenity: Part of what makes Gull so unnerving is his calm and dispassionate exterior. As he butchers his final victim, he conducts himself as if conducting... well... an autopsy. ** Campbell's subdued artwork, the rigid page layouts, the loose handwritten lettering and the time period all conspire to create a more or less constant illusion of serenity; observe for instance Abberline's apoplectic verbal assault on a fellow copper, carried out in what seems at first glance to be calm and reasonable tones for a full page, until we see the cop shivering and wiping the sweat from his face. * DoorStopper: The collected edition would probably kill you if it fell on your head. And it's a ''paperback''. * TheDragon: Gull for the royal family, with Netley as TheBrute * EagleEyeDetection * FakingTheDead: [[spoiler:The last chapter implies that Gull killed the wrong woman in place of Mary Kelly, who escaped to live a life of anonymity back home in Ireland. Or maybe not...]] * FaintingSeer: Robert Lees has dramatic seizures, complete with convulsions and cryptic phrases which he chokes out. * FramingTheGuiltyParty: Lees tries to frame Gull as Jack the Ripper, which turns out to be quite true. Lees actually had no idea that Gull was in any way connected. Lees was just trying to get revenge for an insult. * FunetikAksent * GainaxEnding: [[spoiler: The last chapter (not including the epilogue) features Gull going on an elaborate spiritual journey, traveling back and forth in time, before seemingly [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence reaching the source of all enlightenment...]] only to be confronted by a woman who may or may not be Mary Kelly fled to Ireland who tells him to go back to hell.]] * GeniusBruiser: Sir William performs some pretty impressive pouncing for a scholarly doctor and stroke victim in his seventies. * {{Gayngst}}: Prince Albert displays some * {{Hallucinations}}: These play a large part in Gull's story. Or maybe they are more than hallucinations? * InspiredBy: Alan Moore extrapolated the story from Stephen Knight's theory on the Ripper murders. The idea of conducting an "autopsy" of the period also stemmed from DouglasAdams's ''DirkGentlysHolisticDetectiveAgency'', in which to solve a crime holistically, one would need to solve the entire society in which it occurred. * HistoricalDomainCharacter: Apart from the central characters, most of whom are based on real people, a number of historical celebrities pop their heads in, from OscarWilde, to the Elephant Man, to Alan Moore favourite AleisterCrowley. * HumanoidAbomination: [[spoiler:Creator/WilliamBlake's perception of Gull's spirit.]] The vision inspires his painting, ''The Ghost of a Flea''. * InfoDump: An early chapter is basically Gull traveling around town with his sidekick lecturing him on the secret Masonic/pagan symbolism of London landmarks. * JackTheRipper: ...yup. * LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters: Nearly all of them drawn from real life. * MadDoctor: Gull, who begins to have hallucinations after a stroke, though he seems inclined to cruelty from early on. * MeaningfulName: In the second appendix, Moore points out that Gull is a word for a person easily fooled (from where we derive "gullible"). [[spoiler: Gull, of course, is fooled into believing he actually killed Mary Kelly. Twice.]] * MindScrew: ''"What is the fourth dimension?"'' * NeverSuicide: Needless to say, the police don't inquire too closely into the death of [[spoiler: Montague John Druitt]]. * OldFashionedCopper: Considering it's 1888, all of them, really. * OminousFog: It's Victorian London. It's always foggy. * PhonyPsychic: Robert Lees. He's making it all up. [[PropheciesAreAlwaysRight But it all came true anyway]]. * PoeticSerialKiller: Gull is a particularly disturbing example of this trope. * PoliceProcedural * PlatonicProstitution: Abberline's relationship with "Fair Emma". * PsychoForHire: Sir Wiilliam Gull. He's hired for his discretion, but turns out to be quite AxCrazy. * [[ViewersAreGeniuses Readers Are Geniuses]]: The work is teeming with references to historical figures and events, a lengthy exchange on fourth dimensional theory, psychogeography, Masonic ritual and Pagan mysticism and the Illuminati. Reading the appendix is not just recommended. It's a necessity. * TheReasonYouSuckSpeech: Gull delivers one to Lees, which ironically prompts Lees to try to frame him for the Ripper murders. Gull starts to deliver a real apocalyptic one to the Masonic Council before his dementia catches up with him and he trails off in confusion. * {{Reconstruction}}: ''From Hell'' deconstructs perceptions of the Victorian era in order to reconstruct them, showing where many of our 20th Century obsessions (detective fiction, sensationalist tabloid journalism, serial killers) originated. * ReverseWhodunnit: The Ripper's identity is revealed in the opening chapters. It's not so much a ''Whodunnit?'' as a ''Whydunnit?'' * UsefulNotes/ScotlandYard: The highest brass as well as a few grunts are a part of the conspiracy, some more willing than others. * ShoutOut: ''Dance of the Gull Catchers'' features Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell [[ItMakesSenseInContext carrying a pair of butterfly nets walking around outside a group of Ripperologists chasing after a gull with their own nets]] while Moore [[BreakingTheFourthWall looks out to the reader and goes]] [[LooneyTunes "Be vewy vewy quiet.]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny We'we hunting wipers!"]] * ShownTheirWork: The comics includes lengthy annotations section detailing the research he put into making the comic, and the truth (or not) behind the more fantastic elements. * SlasherSmile: The one which Gull flashes especially for Netley at the conclusion of their psychogeographical trip through London is horrible. * StylisticSuck: Gull and Netley's letter to the police. Gull has the barely literate Netley write it so as to protect himself. * TitleDrop: Gull very pointedly insists that Netley begin their letter, "From hell." * VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory: Nobody really knows the truth behind the Ripper murders. There are a lot more credible theories than the one presented in this story, though. Moore himself has openly stated that he doesn't believe a word of the theory he uses, but simply found it entertaining enough to build his work around and decided not to let the 'truth' get in the way of a good story. * VictorianLondon: The setting. * VillainsBlendInBetter: Inverted. When the killer briefly time-travels to the modern world, he is horrified by how soulless and banal everything is. * VomitingCop: George Godley, upon finding the corpse of Jack the Ripper's last victim. [[spoiler: Also Abberline once he discovers the full extent of the conspiracy.]] * VomitIndiscretionShot: Netley has an adverse reaction to Sir William Withey Gull's Walking Tour of London. * WifeHusbandry: Walter Sickert allegedly helped raise Alice Crook after her mother was lobotomized by Gull, then when she came of age fathered a child with her, said child being Joseph Gorman, the man who told Stephan Knight about the putative conspiracy theory that Moore based the comic on. * WrongSideOfTheTracks: Limehouse, Whitechapel. ----[[redirect:Comicbook/FromHell]]
30th Aug '13 2:53:17 AM Amake
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Added DiffLines:
* GeniusBruiser: Sir William performs some pretty impressive pouncing for a scholarly doctor and stroke victim in his seventies.
26th Aug '13 4:20:48 PM Amake
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Added DiffLines:
** Campbell's subdued artwork, the rigid page layouts, the loose handwritten lettering and the time period all conspire to create a more or less constant illusion of serenity; observe for instance Abberline's apoplectic verbal assault on a fellow copper, carried out in what seems at first glance to be calm and reasonable tones for a full page, until we see the cop shivering and wiping the sweat from his face.
22nd Aug '13 1:04:10 AM Tuomas
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The first From Hell chapter, in which Abberline appears, was originally published in 1989. So quite obviously Abberline couldn't have based on Robbie Coltrane in Cracker, a series that first aired in 1993.
* ComicBookFantasyCasting: Abberline is pretty blatantly modeled after RobbieColtrane in ''{{Cracker}}''. This is probably a deliberate ShoutOut, as the few pictures available of the real Abberline look completely different. Interestingly, Robbie Coltrane was cast in the film of ''From Hell''... as Abberline's SideKick, Godley.
19th Aug '13 8:16:04 AM ChumHandle
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Added DiffLines:
* {{Gayngst}}: Prince Albert displays some
19th Aug '13 8:14:52 AM ChumHandle
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Added DiffLines:
* DepravedHomosexual: Prince Albert's boyfriend, who [[JerkAss displays a misogynist attitude towards the death of the prostitutes]] and uses sex to distract the latter from the murders
19th Aug '13 8:10:35 AM ChumHandle
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-->"''From hell''
to:
-->"''From hell'' -->"''[[TitleDrop From hell]]''

-->"''From hell'' * AGodAmI: [[spoiler: In Gull's last moments of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] the hallucinations of a depraved, dying mind.]]

-->"''From hell'' * AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence: [[spoiler: Gull believes he is doing this near the end...only for a woman who may possibly be Mary Kelly to tell him to go back to hell.]]

* AGodAmI: In Gull's last moments of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] the hallucinations of a depraved, dying mind.
to:
* AGodAmI: In Gull's GainaxEnding: [[spoiler: The last moments of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] chapter (not including the hallucinations epilogue) features Gull going on an elaborate spiritual journey, traveling back and forth in time, before seemingly [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence reaching the source of all enlightenment...]] only to be confronted by a depraved, dying mind.woman who may or may not be Mary Kelly fled to Ireland who tells him to go back to hell.]]

Added DiffLines:
* AGodAmI: In Gull's last moments of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] InfoDump: An early chapter is basically Gull traveling around town with his sidekick lecturing him on the hallucinations secret Masonic/pagan symbolism of a depraved, dying mind.London landmarks.

Added DiffLines:
* AGodAmI: In Gull's last moments ShoutOut: ''Dance of life, he seems to believe that he's becoming a God. It [[MaybeMagicMaybeMundane might just be]] the hallucinations Gull Catchers'' features Alan Moore and Eddie Campbell [[ItMakesSenseInContext carrying a pair of butterfly nets walking around outside a depraved, dying mind.group of Ripperologists chasing after a gull with their own nets]] while Moore [[BreakingTheFourthWall looks out to the reader and goes]] [[LooneyTunes "Be vewy vewy quiet.]] [[CrowningMomentOfFunny We'we hunting wipers!"]]
11th Jul '13 5:12:10 PM fhtagn
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It was adapted into a [[Film/FromHell film of the same title]] in 2001, starring JohnnyDepp as Inspector Abberline.
to:
It was adapted into a [[Film/FromHell film of the same title]] ([[InNameOnly and not much else]]) in 2001, starring JohnnyDepp as Inspector Abberline.
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