History Main / FrivolousLawSuit

13th Aug '17 6:21:52 PM Malady
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* A woman in Seattle was sued by her neighbor for several hundred thousand dollars because her dog's barking caused him mental anguish and also caused him hearing damage as the barking reached volumes of 120 decibels. (That's louder than an ambulance siren and only slightly softer than a jet engine during takeoff). The woman ignored the lawsuit- since it was obviously frivolous and would never stand up in court- and the neighbor ''won the suit by default'' because she didn't respond. Now she's at risk of losing her home and it's going to take some ''serious'' legal fees for lawyers to overturn the lawsuit[[note]]The actual default can be waived pretty easily - all that you have to do is file a motion to set aside a default judgment, and if the motion isn't obviously frivolous, the court will usually grant it. It's drafting the motion that can be costly - while motions themselves are almost always copied with minor alterations, Mad Libs-style, from a preexisting template, few laypeople have access to law books or other sources of those templates and have to rely on attorneys to do it for them. A motion written by an ordinary citizen will likely lack crucial elements and be thrown out.[[/note]].

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* A woman in Seattle was sued by her neighbor for several hundred thousand dollars because her dog's barking caused him mental anguish and also caused him hearing damage as the barking reached volumes of 120 decibels. (That's louder than an ambulance siren and only slightly softer than a jet engine during takeoff). The woman ignored the lawsuit- since it was obviously frivolous and would never stand up in court- and the neighbor ''won the suit by default'' because she didn't respond. Now she's at risk of losing her home and it's going to take some ''serious'' legal fees for lawyers to overturn the lawsuit[[note]]The actual default can be waived pretty easily - all that you have to do is file a motion to set aside a default judgment, and if the motion isn't obviously frivolous, the court will usually grant it. It's drafting the motion that can be costly - while motions themselves are almost always copied with minor alterations, Mad Libs-style, from a preexisting template, few laypeople have access to law books or other sources of those templates and have to rely on attorneys to do it for them. A motion written by an ordinary citizen will likely lack crucial elements and be thrown out.[[/note]]. However, courts can set aside default judgments “for good cause shown and upon such terms as the court deems just.”
9th Aug '17 12:28:43 PM KingLyger
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* In early 2016 James Romine- one of the two heads behind independent game developer studio Digital Homicide- filed a lawsuit against video game journalist [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]. Sterling- a games journalist- had been covering Digital Homicide for some time, negatively critiquing their games (all of which had very little real gameplay, were made entirely of premade assets, and had litanies of bugs and glaring flaws that went un-patched) and reporting on their assorted underhanded activities (setting up 9 fake accounts to post games and cranking out so many games their average development time was less than a month each). After publicly clashing with Sterling several times Romine sued Sterling for 10.7 million dollars (later bumped up to 12.5 million) charging every single thing Sterling has ever said or written about them was libel. The crux of the lawsuit was an article Sterling published where he alleged a game's artwork had been stolen when it had been purchased- an article that Sterling corrected so quickly Romine had to cite ''Sterling's own retraction'' to prove it existed. Most of the complaints cited are over petty insults, like when Sterling compared them to the villains in ''Film/HomeAlone''. Romine also demanded Sterling take down every article and video talking about Digital Homicide and replace them with an apology video on his Youtube channel for at least five years. Romine ended up representing himself- as no lawyer would take the case- and Romine also demanded Sterling compensate him for the time he spent researching law ''so he could file the lawsuit in the first place.''
** In January 2017 the lawsuit was thrown out because Romine filed as a singular person, yet spent the entire lawsuit claiming damages against a company. Romine re-filed the lawsuit with almost no changes, with the total amount sought now increased to 15 million dollars. Romine now charged that Sterling was guilty of civil conspiracy- claiming that Sterling attacked the company because Sterling does voice work for games and thus was a direct competitor. [[note]]Sterling doesn't make any money off the sales of the games he voices. As with most voice actors, he gets paid in advance regardless of how a game sells.[[/note]] The case was eventually dropped when Sterling's lawyer visited Romine for official business and drilled into his head ''how deeply and utterly screwed he'd be if he tried to air all his whiny bullshit in court.'' Romine filed to dismiss the case in March 2017.

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* In early 2016 2016, James Romine- Romine - one of the two heads behind independent game developer studio Digital Homicide- Homicide - filed a lawsuit against video game journalist [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]. Sterling- a games journalist- Sterling had been covering Digital Homicide for some time, negatively critiquing their games (all of which had very little real gameplay, were made entirely of premade assets, and had litanies of bugs and glaring flaws that went un-patched) and reporting on their assorted underhanded activities (setting up 9 fake accounts to post games games, and cranking out so many games their average development time was less than a month each). month). After publicly clashing with Sterling several times times, Romine sued Sterling for 10.$10.7 million dollars (later bumped up to 12.$12.5 million) million), charging every single thing that anything Sterling has ever said or written about them was libel. The crux of the lawsuit was an article Sterling published where he alleged a game's artwork had been stolen when it had been purchased- an article that purchased - Sterling had already noted this and corrected his article much earlier. In fact, Sterling had corrected it so quickly quickly, Romine had to cite ''Sterling's own retraction'' to prove it existed.even happened. Most of the complaints cited are over petty insults, like when Sterling compared them to the villains in ''Film/HomeAlone''. Romine also demanded Sterling take down every article and video talking about Digital Homicide and replace them with an apology video on his Youtube channel for at least five years. Romine ended up [[AFoolForAClient representing himself- as himself since no lawyer would take the case- case]], and Romine also demanded Sterling compensate him for the time he spent researching law ''so he could file the lawsuit in the first place.''
** In January 2017 2017, the lawsuit was thrown out because Romine filed as a singular person, yet spent the entire lawsuit claiming damages against a company. Romine re-filed the lawsuit with almost no changes, with the total amount sought now increased to 15 million dollars. $15 million. Romine now charged that Sterling was guilty of civil conspiracy- conspiracy, claiming that Sterling attacked the company because Sterling does voice work for games and thus was a direct competitor. [[note]]Sterling doesn't make any money off the sales of the games he voices. As with most voice actors, he gets paid in advance regardless of how a game sells.[[/note]] The case was eventually dropped when Sterling's lawyer visited Romine for official business business, and drilled into his head ''how how deeply and utterly screwed he'd Romine would be if he tried to air all his whiny bullshit in court.'' the case ever saw the inside of a courtroom. Romine filed to dismiss the case in March 2017.
3rd Aug '17 4:39:36 PM RoninMacbeth
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* The Church of Scientology, every time you say anything at all that may be criticizing them. Seriously. If what you say is (according to them) false, it's libel or slander (depending on the medium of dissemination). If it's true, and about any of their doctrine, dogma or practices, it's ''copyright infringement''. Other cases, they just dig around until they find something to pick at. No matter how little the chance of you being a threat. They don't do it for the money, they do it to bankrupt their victims with legal fees, thus shutting them up, plus the potential intimidation factor against people who might want to criticize the Church but would rather not risk getting sued to oblivion for doing so (given that they fought the U.S. Government and ''won'').

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* The Church of Scientology, ChurchOfHappyology, every time you say anything at all that may be criticizing them. Seriously. If what you say is (according to them) false, it's libel or slander (depending on the medium of dissemination). If it's true, and about any of their doctrine, dogma or practices, it's ''copyright infringement''. Other cases, they just dig around until they find something to pick at. No matter how little the chance of you being a threat. They don't do it for the money, they do it to bankrupt their victims with legal fees, thus shutting them up, plus the potential intimidation factor against people who might want to criticize the Church but would rather not risk getting sued to oblivion for doing so (given that they fought the U.S. Government and ''won'').
12th Jul '17 1:02:31 PM ironballs16
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* ''Administrative law judge'' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearson_v._Chung Roy Pearson]] sued a small, family-owned laundromat for fifty-four million dollars in damages after they misplaced a pair of his trousers for a day or two. It was finally settled once and for all after roughly four years. He lost, but not before making the life of the laundromat owners thoroughly miserable, even after they made repeated offers to settle for $3000, $4600, and $12000. He's also no longer a judge, thanks in part to this suit.

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* ''Administrative law judge'' [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearson_v._Chung Roy Pearson]] sued a small, family-owned laundromat for fifty-four million dollars in damages [[DisproportionateRetribution after they misplaced a pair of his trousers for a day or two.two]]. It was finally settled once and for all after roughly four years. He lost, but not before making the life of the laundromat owners thoroughly miserable, even after they made repeated offers to settle for $3000, $4600, and $12000. He's also no longer a judge, thanks in part to this suit.
21st Jun '17 9:58:51 AM Gosicrystal
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* When Creator/MichaelJackson released "Billy Jean", he was sued by a woman who was actually named Billy Jean Jackson, claiming the song had been written to mock her. why? She claimed she ''was'' his lover, that Jackson had married her, and also the mother of his first child. (Jackson never revealed who Blanket's mother was, claiming it had been a surrogate). She sued for £668 million (that's over a billion U.S. dollars) joint custody, and a say in Blanket's education. A blood test easily proved she was lying, so ironically, the lyrics of the song were AccidentallyAccurate when claiming "she's just a girl who says that I am the one".

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* When Creator/MichaelJackson released "Billy Jean", he was sued by a woman who was actually named Billy Jean Jackson, claiming the song had been written to mock her. why? Why? She claimed she ''was'' his lover, that Jackson had married her, and also the mother of his first child. (Jackson never revealed who Blanket's mother was, claiming it had been a surrogate). She sued for £668 million (that's over a billion U.S. dollars) joint custody, and a say in Blanket's education. A blood test easily proved she was lying, so ironically, the lyrics of the song were AccidentallyAccurate accurate when claiming "she's just a girl who says that I am the one".
19th Jun '17 11:29:22 PM morane
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Added DiffLines:

Note that FrivolousLawsuit s are the menace of those countries and judicial systems which follow the common law or which follow the judicial sources literally. They are less an issue in those countries which follow the civil law, such as Romano-German judicial system. In several countries, the judge can dismiss a lawsuit completely if he or she sees it as a pointless, frivolous or as an attempt to abuse the judicial system. This is known in the Romano-German system as ''prohibition of vexatious litigation'': law may not be used to cause harm to someone. Abuse of legal rights was prohibited already in the 1734 law in Sweden.
17th Jun '17 8:23:55 AM TheBigBopper
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Alice is idling herco car out of the driveway when she accidentally bumps into a stranger, Bob. "Ow, my back!" Bob exclaims. "The pain is immeasurable! I'll sue you! I'll sue!"

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Alice is idling herco her car out of the driveway when she accidentally bumps into a stranger, Bob. "Ow, my back!" Bob exclaims. "The pain is immeasurable! I'll sue you! I'll sue!"
15th Jun '17 6:06:45 AM PrincessPandaTrope
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Added DiffLines:

* A mother in California sued Spin Master because her child's Hatchimal, the one of the company's toys, did not hatch. [[CoversAlwaysLie She claimed it was trickery.]] It turned out the reason the robot did not hatch was that [[CriticalResearchFailure the batteries were dead]].
8th Jun '17 8:22:28 AM Piterpicher
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* In early 2016 James Romine- one of the two heads behind independent game developer studio Digital Homicide- filed a lawsuit against video game journalist [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]. Sterling- a games journalist- had been covering Digital Homicide for some time, negatively critiquing their games (all of which had very little real gameplay, were made entirely of premade assets, and had litanies of bugs and glaring flaws that went un-patched) and reporting on their assorted underhanded activities (setting up 9 fake accounts to post games and cranking out so many games their average development time was less than a month each). After publicly clashing with Sterling several times Romine sued Sterling for 10.7 million dollars (later bumped up to 12.5 million) charging every single thing Sterling has ever said or written about them was libel. The crux of the lawsuit was an article Sterling published where he alleged a game's artwork had been stolen when it had been purchased- an article that Sterling corrected so quickly Romine had to cite ''Sterling's own retraction'' to prove it existed. Most of the complaints cited are over petty insults, like when Sterling compared them to the villains in ''HomeAlone''. Romine also demanded Sterling take down every article and video talking about Digital Homicide and replace them with an apology video on his Youtube channel for at least five years. Romine ended up representing himself- as no lawyer would take the case- and Romine also demanded Sterling compensate him for the time he spent researching law ''so he could file the lawsuit in the first place.''

to:

* In early 2016 James Romine- one of the two heads behind independent game developer studio Digital Homicide- filed a lawsuit against video game journalist [[WebVideo/{{Jimquisition}} Jim Sterling]]. Sterling- a games journalist- had been covering Digital Homicide for some time, negatively critiquing their games (all of which had very little real gameplay, were made entirely of premade assets, and had litanies of bugs and glaring flaws that went un-patched) and reporting on their assorted underhanded activities (setting up 9 fake accounts to post games and cranking out so many games their average development time was less than a month each). After publicly clashing with Sterling several times Romine sued Sterling for 10.7 million dollars (later bumped up to 12.5 million) charging every single thing Sterling has ever said or written about them was libel. The crux of the lawsuit was an article Sterling published where he alleged a game's artwork had been stolen when it had been purchased- an article that Sterling corrected so quickly Romine had to cite ''Sterling's own retraction'' to prove it existed. Most of the complaints cited are over petty insults, like when Sterling compared them to the villains in ''HomeAlone''.''Film/HomeAlone''. Romine also demanded Sterling take down every article and video talking about Digital Homicide and replace them with an apology video on his Youtube channel for at least five years. Romine ended up representing himself- as no lawyer would take the case- and Romine also demanded Sterling compensate him for the time he spent researching law ''so he could file the lawsuit in the first place.''
7th Jun '17 10:15:11 PM Chytus
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* The infamous "Superheated [=McDonald's=] Coffee" suit, often held high up as the epitome of this, is actually an {{aver|tedTrope}}sion. The facts of the case are more complicated than most stories mentioning it indicate, but the gist is The vast majority of the award was ''punitive'' damages, imposed by ''the jury'' after substantial evidence that McDolald's knew very well that the corporate policy required that coffee be served at temperatures that could easily cause serious burns if it was spilled. Additionally, Ms Liebeck originally asked for $20,000 in settlement to cover her medical bills; McDonald's counter offer was $800.

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* The infamous "Superheated [=McDonald's=] Coffee" suit, often held high up as the epitome of this, is actually an {{aver|tedTrope}}sion. The facts of the case are more complicated than most stories mentioning it indicate, but the gist is The that the vast majority of the award was ''punitive'' damages, imposed by ''the jury'' after substantial evidence that McDolald's [=McDonald's=] knew very well that the corporate policy required that coffee be served at temperatures that could easily cause serious burns if it was spilled. Additionally, Ms Ms. Liebeck originally asked for $20,000 in settlement to cover her medical bills; McDonald's [=McDonald's=] counter offer was $800.
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