History Main / FrivolousLawSuit

20th May '17 3:01:12 PM nombretomado
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* In ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'', several of the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ovLsFhd-EM adverts you can hear on the radio]] are political broadcasts for a fictional Republican senator. The first two imply his Democratic opponent has committed vehicular homicide (on the basis he owns a car of the type responsible for one in the area) and child pornography (on the basis he has not yet stated his opinion on the subject). When he sues the Republican, a third ad notes the Democrat had previously claimed to be against clogging up the courts with frivolous lawsuits, and implies he is a hypocrite ("Would you want your children to become hypocrites? Vote Republican candidate Robert Thorne, the candidate not accused of being a murderous child pornographer!")

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* In ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'', ''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines'', several of the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ovLsFhd-EM adverts you can hear on the radio]] are political broadcasts for a fictional Republican senator. The first two imply his Democratic opponent has committed vehicular homicide (on the basis he owns a car of the type responsible for one in the area) and child pornography (on the basis he has not yet stated his opinion on the subject). When he sues the Republican, a third ad notes the Democrat had previously claimed to be against clogging up the courts with frivolous lawsuits, and implies he is a hypocrite ("Would you want your children to become hypocrites? Vote Republican candidate Robert Thorne, the candidate not accused of being a murderous child pornographer!")
17th May '17 1:57:07 PM Steven
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* A man sued a woman he went on a blind date with for $17.34 to cover the cost of the movie tickets after she got up and walked out of the theater when he asked her to stop texting during the movie. The woman claims her date was acting narcissistic and rude, which made her uncomfortable and motivated her to ditch him.
1st May '17 8:43:57 AM dmcreif
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* Website/NotAlwaysRight has had some demonstrations of this:

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* Website/NotAlwaysRight has had some demonstrations of this:this. Almost every lawsuit threatened in any story will turn out to be frivolous:


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** [[https://notalwaysright.com/standards-falling-really-falling/63665 This elderly woman]] tried to scam a department store by faking a slip-and-fall accident. The CCTV footage immediately disqualifies her claims.
30th Apr '17 1:15:48 PM jamespaul94
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* After the cancellation of the 2016 NFL Pro Football Hall of Fame due to field conditions, twenty fans who had come from out of state to watch the game filed a lawsuit against the Hall of Fame and the NFL as a whole claiming that the money spent on tickets and lodging was wasted, even though the NFL did refund all of the tickets sold for the game.
24th Apr '17 10:02:31 AM drwhom
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Under Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 11(b) or its equivalent in a court system that has one, anyone signing a paper to be filed in court is representing to the court that they have made "an inquiry reasonable under the circumstances...." Violation of Rule 11(b) can lead to sanctions, either upon motion by the other party or on the court's own initiative.
19th Apr '17 11:41:07 AM faunas
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The majority of the truly outrageous examples you might have heard of are filed ''pro se'', without an attorney. That's because none want to touch the craziness with a ten-foot pole. If there's an actual attorney involved who isn't also their own client[[note]]"A man who is his own attorney has a fool for a client."[[/note]] the case might not be so frivolous as it first appears. This is particularly common in personal injury, where "only paid if you win" is the standard; the prospect of eating the cost of an unsuccessful case forces attorneys to be very selective about the cases they take, ergo they're not going to take something unless they have very good reason to believe that it will be determined in their favor.

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The majority of the truly outrageous examples you might have heard of are filed ''pro se'', without an attorney. That's because none want to touch the craziness with a ten-foot pole. If there's an actual attorney involved who isn't also their own client[[note]]"A man who is his own attorney has a fool for a client.AFoolForAClient."[[/note]] the case might not be so frivolous as it first appears. This is particularly common in personal injury, where "only paid if you win" is the standard; the prospect of eating the cost of an unsuccessful case forces attorneys to be very selective about the cases they take, ergo they're not going to take something unless they have very good reason to believe that it will be determined in their favor.
15th Apr '17 3:24:11 PM MagBas
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* [[MeaningfulName Courtney]] from ''WesternAnimation/TotalDramaIsland''. Her first lawsuit wasn't so unjustified (fellow competitor Harold rigged the votes against her, sending her home instead, and the host of the show didn't care), but she also bargained for unfair advantages (most notably contact with the outside world via her PDA) along with reentry into the second season. Once she was back in the game, she threatened to sue the producers again [[JerkSue every time something didn't go her way]].

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* [[MeaningfulName Courtney]] from ''WesternAnimation/TotalDramaIsland''. Her first lawsuit wasn't so unjustified (fellow competitor Harold rigged the votes against her, sending her home instead, and the host of the show didn't care), but she also bargained for unfair advantages (most notably contact with the outside world via her PDA) along with reentry into the second season. Once she was back in the game, she threatened to sue the producers again [[JerkSue every time something didn't go her way]].way.
14th Apr '17 5:40:54 PM monkey60t
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* In the year 2014, Creator/Lindsay Lohan sued Creator/Rockstar Games, accusing the company of basing the in-game celebrity Lacey Jonas and the blonde, bikini-clad girl in the game's merchandising materials on her likeness without her permission. The case was thrown out by the judge, as the character's appearance was actually based on that of the fashion model Shelby Welinder, and it was found that Rockstar Games had absolutely no contact with her whatsoever.
14th Apr '17 2:32:47 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* Harmony Gold, Western publishers of ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'', was at one time an industry giant riding high on the popularity of their licensed material. They also initially sued several other franchises (Hasbro staple ''Franchise/TheTransformers'' and FASA's front runner ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'') for using the designs of mecha that were originally from ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'', even though those uses had been licensed from the original Japanese rights holders[[note]]Or at least believed that they had; in the case of FASA, it was shown that the company which had licensed the rights, 20th Century Imports, did not in fact have any connection to Bandai, the actual rights holders. FASA settled out of court with Harmony Gold in 1997, and mooted a fraud suit against TCI afterwards.[[/note]]. It proved too expensive for Hasbro and FASA to keep fighting, so they settled and effectively {{UnPerson}}ed the offending products. Problem is, when the Japanese courts went and took a look at it, they ruled that Harmony Gold's rights weren't license rights for ''Anime/{{Macross}}''-derived work, but ''distribution'' rights. In other words, Harmony Gold can sell all the ''Macross''-based product it wants (or doesn't want), but had no legal power to say who could or could not use images from ''Macross'' in the West under new names. Creator/StudioNue, the original license holder, could tell the other Western companies to stop, but seem to have no inclination to do so. Harmony Gold continues to try to sue anyway, targeting Hasbro in 2013 over a ''Franchise/GIJoe'' vehicle that loosely resembles a Valkyrie in fighter mode (which just so happens to look like an F-14 Tomcat fighter, a vehicle already in the G.I. Joe armory). The difference is that Harmony Gold is now such a small and thoroughly despised fish in the market that even the owners of ''Battletech'', a franchise that's been handed off no less than four times, look down on them, to say nothing of international toy giants like Hasbro. Reportedly, Hasbro's lawyers sat down with Harmony Gold's, showed them the 30-years-ancient G.I. Joe products they were updating (and that Harmony Gold had not thought to sue over before) and asked if they ''really'' wanted this to be taken to a public court. Harmony Gold sheepishly cut its losses and dropped the suit.

to:

* Harmony Gold, Western publishers of ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'', was at one time an industry giant riding high on the popularity of their licensed material. They also initially sued several other franchises (Hasbro staple ''Franchise/TheTransformers'' and FASA's front runner ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'') for using the designs of mecha that were originally from ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'', even though those uses had been licensed from the original Japanese rights holders[[note]]Or at least believed that they had; in the case of FASA, it was shown that the company which had licensed the rights, 20th Century Imports, did not in fact have any connection to Bandai, the actual rights holders. FASA settled out of court with Harmony Gold in 1997, and mooted a fraud suit against TCI afterwards.[[/note]]. It proved too expensive for Hasbro and FASA to keep fighting, so they settled and effectively {{UnPerson}}ed the offending products. Problem is, when the Japanese courts went and took a look at it, they ruled that Harmony Gold's rights weren't license rights for ''Anime/{{Macross}}''-derived work, but ''distribution'' rights. In other words, Harmony Gold can sell all the ''Macross''-based product it wants (or doesn't want), but had no legal power to say who could or could not use images from ''Macross'' in the West under new names. Creator/StudioNue, the original license holder, could tell the other Western companies to stop, but seem to have no inclination to do so. Harmony Gold continues to try to sue anyway, targeting Hasbro in 2013 over a ''Franchise/GIJoe'' vehicle that loosely resembles a Valkyrie in fighter mode (which just so happens to look like an F-14 Tomcat fighter, a vehicle already in the G.I. Joe armory). The difference is that Harmony Gold is now such a small and thoroughly despised fish in the market that even the owners of ''Battletech'', a franchise that's been handed off no less than four times, look down on them, to say nothing of international toy giants like Hasbro. Reportedly, Hasbro's lawyers sat down with Harmony Gold's, showed them the 30-years-ancient G.I. Joe products they were updating (and that Harmony Gold had not thought to sue over before) and asked if they ''really'' wanted this to be taken to a public court. Harmony Gold sheepishly cut its losses and dropped the suit.
14th Apr '17 2:31:22 PM Schol-R-LEA
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* Harmony Gold, Western publishers of ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'', was at one time an industry giant riding high on the popularity of their licensed material. They also initially sued several other franchises (Hasbro staple ''Franchise/TheTransformers'' and FASA's front runner ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'') for using the designs of mecha that were originally from ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'', even though those uses had been licensed from the original Japanese rights holders. It proved too expensive for Hasbro and FASA to keep fighting, so they settled and effectively {{UnPerson}}ed the offending products. Problem is, when the Japanese courts went and took a look at it, they ruled that Harmony Gold's rights weren't license rights for ''Anime/{{Macross}}''-derived work, but ''distribution'' rights. In other words, Harmony Gold can sell all the ''Macross''-based product it wants (or doesn't want), but had no legal power to say who could or could not use images from ''Macross'' in the West under new names. Creator/StudioNue, the original license holder, could tell the other Western companies to stop, but seem to have no inclination to do so. Harmony Gold continues to try to sue anyway, targeting Hasbro in 2013 over a ''Franchise/GIJoe'' vehicle that loosely resembles a Valkyrie in fighter mode (which just so happens to look like an F-14 Tomcat fighter, a vehicle already in the G.I. Joe armory). The difference is that Harmony Gold is now such a small and thoroughly despised fish in the market that even the owners of ''Battletech'', a franchise that's been handed off no less than four times, look down on them, to say nothing of international toy giants like Hasbro. Reportedly, Hasbro's lawyers sat down with Harmony Gold's, showed them the 30-years-ancient G.I. Joe products they were updating (and that Harmony Gold had not thought to sue over before) and asked if they ''really'' wanted this to be taken to a public court. Harmony Gold sheepishly cut its losses and dropped the suit.

to:

* Harmony Gold, Western publishers of ''Anime/{{Robotech}}'', was at one time an industry giant riding high on the popularity of their licensed material. They also initially sued several other franchises (Hasbro staple ''Franchise/TheTransformers'' and FASA's front runner ''TabletopGame/BattleTech'') for using the designs of mecha that were originally from ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'', even though those uses had been licensed from the original Japanese rights holders.holders[[note]]Or at least believed that they had; in the case of FASA, it was shown that the company which had licensed the rights, 20th Century Imports, did not in fact have any connection to Bandai, the actual rights holders. FASA settled out of court with Harmony Gold in 1997, and mooted a fraud suit against TCI afterwards.[[/note]]. It proved too expensive for Hasbro and FASA to keep fighting, so they settled and effectively {{UnPerson}}ed the offending products. Problem is, when the Japanese courts went and took a look at it, they ruled that Harmony Gold's rights weren't license rights for ''Anime/{{Macross}}''-derived work, but ''distribution'' rights. In other words, Harmony Gold can sell all the ''Macross''-based product it wants (or doesn't want), but had no legal power to say who could or could not use images from ''Macross'' in the West under new names. Creator/StudioNue, the original license holder, could tell the other Western companies to stop, but seem to have no inclination to do so. Harmony Gold continues to try to sue anyway, targeting Hasbro in 2013 over a ''Franchise/GIJoe'' vehicle that loosely resembles a Valkyrie in fighter mode (which just so happens to look like an F-14 Tomcat fighter, a vehicle already in the G.I. Joe armory). The difference is that Harmony Gold is now such a small and thoroughly despised fish in the market that even the owners of ''Battletech'', a franchise that's been handed off no less than four times, look down on them, to say nothing of international toy giants like Hasbro. Reportedly, Hasbro's lawyers sat down with Harmony Gold's, showed them the 30-years-ancient G.I. Joe products they were updating (and that Harmony Gold had not thought to sue over before) and asked if they ''really'' wanted this to be taken to a public court. Harmony Gold sheepishly cut its losses and dropped the suit.
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