History Main / FreudianExcuse

23rd Jan '16 9:37:05 AM Specialist290
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Takes the "It's Nurture" position of the "Nature vs. Nurture" argument. For the Nature position, see InTheBlood.

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Takes the "It's Nurture" position of the "Nature vs. Nurture" "NatureVersusNurture" argument. For the Nature position, see InTheBlood.
7th Jan '16 4:41:22 PM nombretomado
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-->-- '''Zorak''', ''[[SpaceGhostCoastToCoast Cartoon Planet]]''

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-->-- '''Zorak''', ''[[SpaceGhostCoastToCoast Cartoon Planet]]''
''WesternAnimation/CartoonPlanet''
1st Oct '15 5:00:02 PM HighCrate
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The excuse can be played with in many ways. One way is to use it to show how ''pathetic'' a villain is -- after the villain gives a BreakingSpeech, a hero's classic rebuttal is "[[GenreSavvy says the guy who became a hit man to work out his daddy issues]]." The second way is for the villain to sneer at the hero's pity for them, even exploiting it in a fight. (Further, the villain is protesting far too much.) A third way is to simply present it as an ''explanation'' rather than a full excuse. Sometimes the author simply shows what warped the character into what they became without expecting the audience to feel any more sympathetic toward the character- a sort of psychological HowWeGotHere. And a ''fourth'' way is to use the {{Freudian Excuse}} as a justification for a {{Heel Face Turn}}; if the villain gets treatment he no longer has any reason to be evil and may pay the heroes back out of gratitude.

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The excuse can be played with in many ways. One way is to use it to show how ''pathetic'' a villain is -- after the villain gives a BreakingSpeech, a hero's classic rebuttal is "[[GenreSavvy says "says the guy who became a hit man to work out his daddy issues]].issues." The second way is for the villain to sneer at the hero's pity for them, even exploiting it in a fight. (Further, the villain is protesting far too much.) A third way is to simply present it as an ''explanation'' rather than a full excuse. Sometimes the author simply shows what warped the character into what they became without expecting the audience to feel any more sympathetic toward the character- a sort of psychological HowWeGotHere. And a ''fourth'' way is to use the {{Freudian Excuse}} as a justification for a {{Heel Face Turn}}; if the villain gets treatment he no longer has any reason to be evil and may pay the heroes back out of gratitude.
14th Jul '15 3:37:34 PM Nohbody
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[[noreallife]]



* FreudianExcuse/RealLife
30th May '15 12:00:08 PM DavidCowie
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A thing to remember about this trope is that '''FreudianExcuse is not an inherently "bad" trope.''' [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.

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A thing to remember about this trope is that '''FreudianExcuse is not an inherently "bad" trope.''' [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's its usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's its usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.
26th May '15 11:25:20 AM ChaoticNovelist
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The excuse however is often subverted. One way is to use it to show how ''pathetic'' a villain is -- after the villain gives a BreakingSpeech, a hero's classic rebuttal is "[[GenreSavvy says the guy who became a hit man to work out his daddy issues]]." The second is for the villain to sneer at the hero's pity for them, even exploiting it in a fight. (In a DoubleSubversion, the villain is protesting far too much.) A third subversion is to simply present it as an ''explanation'' rather than a full excuse. Sometimes the author simply shows what warped the character into what they became without expecting the audience to feel any more sympathetic toward the character- a sort of psychological HowWeGotHere. And a ''fourth'' subversion is to use the {{Freudian Excuse}} as a justification for a {{Heel Face Turn}}; if the villain gets treatment he no longer has any reason to be evil and may pay the heroes back out of gratitude.

One thing that is almost never done is to explain how far back the abuse goes. For example, if the villain was beaten by his father, was the father beaten by ''his'' father? Most shows don't care.

to:

The excuse however is often subverted.can be played with in many ways. One way is to use it to show how ''pathetic'' a villain is -- after the villain gives a BreakingSpeech, a hero's classic rebuttal is "[[GenreSavvy says the guy who became a hit man to work out his daddy issues]]." The second way is for the villain to sneer at the hero's pity for them, even exploiting it in a fight. (In a DoubleSubversion, (Further, the villain is protesting far too much.) A third subversion way is to simply present it as an ''explanation'' rather than a full excuse. Sometimes the author simply shows what warped the character into what they became without expecting the audience to feel any more sympathetic toward the character- a sort of psychological HowWeGotHere. And a ''fourth'' subversion way is to use the {{Freudian Excuse}} as a justification for a {{Heel Face Turn}}; if the villain gets treatment he no longer has any reason to be evil and may pay the heroes back out of gratitude.

One thing that is almost never done is to explain how far back the abuse goes. For example, if the villain was beaten by his father, was the father beaten by ''his'' father? Most shows don't care.
gratitude.
30th Apr '15 8:35:27 AM TokoWH
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A thing to remember about this trope is that FreudianExcuse is '''not an inherently "bad" trope.''' [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.

to:

A thing to remember about this trope is that FreudianExcuse '''FreudianExcuse is '''not not an inherently "bad" trope.''' [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.
29th Apr '15 1:37:10 PM TokoWH
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A thing to remember about this trope is that FreudianExcuse is not an inherently "bad" trope. [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.

to:

A thing to remember about this trope is that FreudianExcuse is not '''not an inherently "bad" trope. trope.''' [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.
29th Apr '15 1:13:34 PM TokoWH
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Added DiffLines:

A thing to remember about this trope is that FreudianExcuse is not an inherently "bad" trope. [[TropesAreTools Like any trope, there are good examples of it's usage just as much as there are bad examples of it's usage.]] Make sure to keep this in mind in regards to adding examples about this trope.
26th Dec '14 8:19:46 AM SeptimusHeap
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FreudianExcuse