History Main / FreePrizeAtTheBottom

18th Oct '16 5:32:55 PM LadyJaneGrey
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A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.

to:

A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.
away. As a result, the term is nowadays used as an analogy for something ''very'' cheap.
18th Oct '16 5:31:45 PM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* At the climax of ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'', Yogurt tells Lone Starr that the Ring of the Schwartz - which he formerly claimed was enchanted - [[MagicFeather is cheap junk]], that he got it from a box of Crackerjacks.
1st Oct '16 12:45:06 AM Tron80
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* This first time [[Franchise/SpiderMan Peter Parker]] proposed to Mary Jane (she wouldn't say yes ''this'' time) he did so by giving her a box of Cracker Jack, with the regular prize inside replaced by an engagement ring.
* When the Matrix version of Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} is dealing with becoming an Earth Angel, she discusses her situation with [[Comicbook/{{Superman}} Clark]] over a box of Cracker Jack. He mentions that he and Pete Ross used to guess what the prize was, until x-ray vision took the fun out of it, but swears he hasn't x-rayed this box. After he's gone, she finds that the prize just happens to be a pendant shaped like an angel.

to:

* Franchise/SpiderMan: This first time [[Franchise/SpiderMan Peter Parker]] Parker proposed to Mary Jane (she wouldn't say yes ''this'' time) he did so by giving her a box of Cracker Jack, with the regular prize inside replaced by an engagement ring.
* When the Matrix version of Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} is dealing with becoming an Earth Angel, she discusses her situation with [[Comicbook/{{Superman}} [[Franchise/{{Superman}} Clark]] over a box of Cracker Jack. He mentions that he and Pete Ross used to guess what the prize was, until x-ray vision took the fun out of it, but swears he hasn't x-rayed this box. After he's gone, she finds that the prize just happens to be a pendant shaped like an angel.
6th Sep '16 1:34:41 AM MorganWick
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In fiction, when characters notice the free prize at the bottom label on their box of cereal (or other package), they will attempt to cash in immediately. This means employing a method of getting past the actual product, such as sticking one's entire arm into the box and digging around while pieces of food fall out. More innovative characters will come up with a less messy method. In some cases, they find that the prize is missing and may have already been taken.

to:

In fiction, when characters notice the free prize at the bottom label on their box of cereal (or other package), they will attempt to cash in immediately. This means employing a method of getting past the actual product, such as sticking one's entire arm into the box and digging around while pieces of food fall out. More innovative characters will come up with a less messy method. In some cases, they find that the prize is missing and may have already been taken.
taken. Sometimes in animation, a character, particularly a BigEater, ''will'' scarf down the prize.
2nd Sep '16 3:29:04 AM sabrina_diamond
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A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[RecognitionFailure repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.

to:

A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[RecognitionFailure [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.
2nd Sep '16 3:28:18 AM sabrina_diamond
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A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, repeated instances of children simply disregarding the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.

to:

A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[RecognitionFailure repeated instances of children simply disregarding disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.
7th Jul '16 8:02:39 PM JMQwilleran
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In fiction, when characters notice the FreePrizeAtTheBottom label on their box of cereal (or other package), they will attempt to cash in immediately. This means employing a method of getting past the actual product, such as sticking one's entire arm into the box and digging around while pieces of food fall out. More innovative characters will come up with a less messy method. In some cases, they find that the prize is missing and may have already been taken.

to:

In fiction, when characters notice the FreePrizeAtTheBottom free prize at the bottom label on their box of cereal (or other package), they will attempt to cash in immediately. This means employing a method of getting past the actual product, such as sticking one's entire arm into the box and digging around while pieces of food fall out. More innovative characters will come up with a less messy method. In some cases, they find that the prize is missing and may have already been taken.
13th Jun '16 7:22:34 AM TonyG
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** Another episode features a box of Krusty-O's brand cereal that comes with a free jagged metal O at the bottom. Bart accidentally eats it.

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** Another episode features a box of Krusty-O's brand cereal that comes with a free jagged metal O at the bottom. Bart accidentally eats it.it, and wins a court settlement from the company, which he then spends [[spoiler:on something for Lisa, [[BecauseYouWereNiceToMe because she was the only one who believed he was sick]].]] He plans to get another settlement from the new Krusty-O's prize - flesh eating bacteria.
21st May '16 5:58:51 PM erforce
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* The first edition ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' RPG adventure module "Ghost Toasties" was about an ancient gem linking to the demon lord of sugar, Hagost, being given away as a prize at the bottom of the cereal box.

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* The first edition ''Film/{{Ghostbusters}}'' ''Franchise/{{Ghostbusters}}'' RPG adventure module "Ghost Toasties" was about an ancient gem linking to the demon lord of sugar, Hagost, being given away as a prize at the bottom of the cereal box.
3rd Mar '16 1:44:43 AM rcmerod52
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Added DiffLines:

* The ''WesternAnimation/JohnnyTest'' episode "Johnny-O's" is centered around this. Johnny is sick about all the lame laser guns that come with cereal boxes, so he decides to create his own cereal--with a working laser gun as a prize inside. It comes back to bite him when Porkbelly goes crazy with the guns.
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