History Main / FreePrizeAtTheBottom

23rd Feb '17 6:08:31 AM DrFraud
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* ''Word Krispies'' involves eating box after box of alphabet cereal in an attempt to discover an important item dropped by the main character while touring a cereal factory. Finishing the last bowlful in a box reveals the usual cheap toy surprise.



* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'' is about Chicken finding a ''credit card'' in a cereal box. Also, in the episode where he gets insomnia after eating coffee-flavoured cereals, he finds a pair of underpants for prize.

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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/CowAndChicken'' is about Chicken finding a ''credit card'' in a cereal box. Also, in the episode where he gets insomnia after eating coffee-flavoured cereals, he finds a pair of underpants for a prize.
19th Feb '17 10:05:37 AM Guide
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* Website/CollegeHumor: Why settle for one prize when you can get a cereal box made entirely of prizes? "All Prizes Cereal" has all the toys you crave without all that boring cereal. It's the best thing to happen to breakfast since marshmellows!

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* Website/CollegeHumor: Why settle for one prize when you can get a cereal box made entirely of prizes? "All Prizes Cereal" has all the toys you crave without all that boring cereal. It's the best thing to happen to breakfast since marshmellows!marshmallows!
5th Feb '17 8:09:31 AM JMQwilleran
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Added DiffLines:

* This is referenced by Zaphod Beeblebrox in ''Literature/TheRestaurantAtTheEndOfTheUniverse'' when a receptionist tells him that the executive he wishes to see is on an intergalactic cruise... in his office.
-->'''Zaphod''': Listen, three eyes, don't you try to outweird me. I get stranger things than you free with my breakfast cereal.
-->'''Receptionist''': Well, just who do you think you are, honey? Zaphod Beeblebrox or something?
-->'''Zaphod''': Count the heads.
4th Feb '17 9:39:30 PM LinTaylor
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Added DiffLines:

** In one Sunday strip, Peter is seen wolfing down bowl after bowl of cereal until the box is empty. He sheepishly turns to Jason and asks "Did you ''really'' want that decoder ring?" Jason's reaction shows that this isn't the first time this has happened.
13th Dec '16 9:22:21 AM Morgenthaler
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Web Original]]
* Website/CollegeHumor: Why settle for one prize when you can get a cereal box made entirely of prizes? "All Prizes Cereal" has all the toys you crave without all that boring cereal. It's the best thing to happen to breakfast since marshmellows!
[[/folder]]
18th Oct '16 5:32:55 PM LadyJaneGrey
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A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.

to:

A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.
away. As a result, the term is nowadays used as an analogy for something ''very'' cheap.
18th Oct '16 5:31:45 PM LadyJaneGrey
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Added DiffLines:

* At the climax of ''Film/{{Spaceballs}}'', Yogurt tells Lone Starr that the Ring of the Schwartz - which he formerly claimed was enchanted - [[MagicFeather is cheap junk]], that he got it from a box of Crackerjacks.
1st Oct '16 12:45:06 AM Tron80
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* This first time [[Franchise/SpiderMan Peter Parker]] proposed to Mary Jane (she wouldn't say yes ''this'' time) he did so by giving her a box of Cracker Jack, with the regular prize inside replaced by an engagement ring.
* When the Matrix version of Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} is dealing with becoming an Earth Angel, she discusses her situation with [[Comicbook/{{Superman}} Clark]] over a box of Cracker Jack. He mentions that he and Pete Ross used to guess what the prize was, until x-ray vision took the fun out of it, but swears he hasn't x-rayed this box. After he's gone, she finds that the prize just happens to be a pendant shaped like an angel.

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* Franchise/SpiderMan: This first time [[Franchise/SpiderMan Peter Parker]] Parker proposed to Mary Jane (she wouldn't say yes ''this'' time) he did so by giving her a box of Cracker Jack, with the regular prize inside replaced by an engagement ring.
* When the Matrix version of Comicbook/{{Supergirl}} is dealing with becoming an Earth Angel, she discusses her situation with [[Comicbook/{{Superman}} [[Franchise/{{Superman}} Clark]] over a box of Cracker Jack. He mentions that he and Pete Ross used to guess what the prize was, until x-ray vision took the fun out of it, but swears he hasn't x-rayed this box. After he's gone, she finds that the prize just happens to be a pendant shaped like an angel.
6th Sep '16 1:34:41 AM MorganWick
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In fiction, when characters notice the free prize at the bottom label on their box of cereal (or other package), they will attempt to cash in immediately. This means employing a method of getting past the actual product, such as sticking one's entire arm into the box and digging around while pieces of food fall out. More innovative characters will come up with a less messy method. In some cases, they find that the prize is missing and may have already been taken.

to:

In fiction, when characters notice the free prize at the bottom label on their box of cereal (or other package), they will attempt to cash in immediately. This means employing a method of getting past the actual product, such as sticking one's entire arm into the box and digging around while pieces of food fall out. More innovative characters will come up with a less messy method. In some cases, they find that the prize is missing and may have already been taken.
taken. Sometimes in animation, a character, particularly a BigEater, ''will'' scarf down the prize.
2nd Sep '16 3:29:04 AM sabrina_diamond
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A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[RecognitionFailure repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.

to:

A once-standard marketing strategy for breakfast cereals and other products meant for children was to put some sort of "prize" at the bottom of the package--typically something plastic and useless, but still [[RuleOfCool pretty cool]] to the target audience. [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cracker_Jack Cracker Jack]], having started this practice in 1912, was likely [[UrExample the first to do so]]. Unfortunately, [[RecognitionFailure [[DoNotDoThisCoolThing repeated instances of children simply disregarding]] the notice of a prize contained inside and scarfing down the contents and choking on the toys led to the widespread abolition of this practice, in some cases by legislation, in others by the willing initiative of the companies manufacturing the product for the sake of avoiding lawsuits. Cracker Jack "Prizes" are now just little paper squares that have little puzzles and stickers on them that even little kids realize are lame, and just end up being thrown away.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FreePrizeAtTheBottom