History Main / FourOneNineScam

21st May '16 6:10:01 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The prevalence of the 419 scam has provided juicy opportunities for "scam baiters," who purposefully pretend to fall for the scam and then force the scammer to do time-wasting/embarrassing things, (hopefully) distracting them from actual victims.

to:

The prevalence of the 419 scam has provided juicy opportunities for "scam baiters," who purposefully pretend to fall for the scam and then force the scammer to do time-wasting/embarrassing things, (hopefully) things in the hopes of distracting them from actual victims.
5th May '16 2:48:43 PM SS7S
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''Series/AThousandWaysToDie'' a Nigerian con artist scams a poor schmuck into giving him his whole life savings. When the victim ultimately realizes he was scammed, he angrily tracks down the con artist and ends up accidentally killing him by [[EyeScream driving a door hook into the con artist's eye]].

to:

* In ''Series/AThousandWaysToDie'' ''Series/OneThousandWaysToDie'' a Nigerian con artist scams a poor schmuck into giving him his whole life savings. When the victim ultimately realizes he was scammed, he angrily tracks down the con artist and ends up accidentally killing him by [[EyeScream driving a door hook into the con artist's eye]].


Added DiffLines:

* In the 7th Episode of the 5th Season of ''Series/MalcolmInTheMiddle'', Reese mentions he was "gonna invest [his money] with this Nigerian General whose been sending [him] emails."
* In the tenth and final episode of the first season of ''Series/BetterCallSaul'', during the scams Jimmy and Marco are pulling, Jimmy tells one victim that there is a 27-year-old Nigerian prince named Idi Abbassi who is worth "conservatively, 400 million dollars." Unfortunately for this prince, the dictatorship of Equatorial Uqbar Orbis is detaining him on trumped-up charges; the Abbassi family will reward whoever helps them get their boy back, but the 'hitch' is that the banks have frozen their assets.
4th May '16 6:35:27 AM RezaMaulana98
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Youtuber Youtube/{{KSI}}, who is Nigerian English, referenced this once. In his video "How to be Rich on Ultimate Team", he told the viewers to send their ''VideoGame/FIFASoccer'' data and bank accounts to the email address [=419NigerianPrinceEA@hotmail.com=] in order to get a [[BlatantLies "blessing"].

to:

* Youtuber Youtube/{{KSI}}, who is Nigerian English, referenced this once. In his video "How to be Rich on Ultimate Team", he told the viewers to send their ''VideoGame/FIFASoccer'' data and bank accounts to the email address [=419NigerianPrinceEA@hotmail.com=] in order to get a [[BlatantLies "blessing"]."blessing"]].
4th May '16 6:34:45 AM RezaMaulana98
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Youtuber Youtube/{{KSI}}, who is Nigerian English, referenced this once. In his video "How to be Rich on Ultimate Team", he told the viewers to send their ''VideoGame/FIFASoccer'' data and bank accounts to the email address [=419NigerianPrinceEA@hotmail.com=] in order to get a [[BlatantLies "blessing"].
1st May '16 9:00:27 AM waqob
Is there an issue? Send a Message


And no, Nigeria does not have a prince or any kind of official royal family. It does have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_current_constituent_African_monarchs#Nigeria some powerless-if-prominent remnants of former tribal monarchies]], but Nigeria has been a federal republic ever since declaring independence from Great Britain in the 1960's.

to:

And no, Nigeria does not have a prince or any kind of official royal family. It does have [[http://en.[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_current_constituent_African_monarchs#Nigeria org/wiki/List_of_Nigerian_traditional_states some powerless-if-prominent remnants of former tribal monarchies]], but Nigeria has been a federal republic ever since declaring independence from Great Britain in the 1960's.
13th Apr '16 9:39:15 AM DonPiano
Is there an issue? Send a Message


The "Nigerian" variant is ''not quite'' a DeadHorseTrope yet; if revelations on scambaiter and British football forums are anything to go by, as a measure of public opinion. Recently, the 419 scam has been spotted with Syria as the country of origin, which is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment unfortunately plausible]] as the current civil war continues. Stereotypes regarding the Middle East (oil, sheiks, etc.) and reports of defectors from the Assad regime may lure the already-susceptible even faster. Also, bizarrely, the UnitedKingdom and UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates are also responsible for this scam. Although ''most'' missives of this nature come to prospective marks as emails, the scam has been around for ''much'' [[OlderThanTheyThink longer than that]], coming as snail-mail. (Some scammers ''do'' still send them as snail-mail, or a similar phone call, particularly to [[http://fraud.org/learn/older-adult-fraud/they-can-t-hang-up elderly people]] who may not use email.)

to:

The "Nigerian" variant is ''not quite'' a DeadHorseTrope yet; if revelations on scambaiter and British football forums are anything to go by, as a measure of public opinion. Recently, the 419 scam has been spotted with Syria as the country of origin, which is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment unfortunately plausible]] as the current civil war continues. Stereotypes regarding the Middle East (oil, sheiks, etc.) and reports of defectors from the Assad regime may lure the already-susceptible even faster. Also, bizarrely, the UnitedKingdom and UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates are also responsible for this scam. Although ''most'' missives of this nature come to prospective marks as emails, the scam has been around for ''much'' [[OlderThanTheyThink longer than that]], coming as snail-mail. (Some scammers ''do'' still send them as snail-mail, or a similar phone call, particularly to [[http://fraud.org/learn/older-adult-fraud/they-can-t-hang-up elderly people]] who may not use email.)
) It is sadly quite common for 419 scams to be created in {{UsefulNotes/India}} as shown by scambaiters; the country is also the origin of [[OperatorFromIndia tech support]] scams which get frequently baited and the calls recorded and put on Website/YouTube as once done even by Joel of ''{{WebVideo/Vinesauce}}''.
7th Apr '16 8:24:26 AM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


And no, Nigeria does not actually have a prince. (It does have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_current_constituent_African_monarchs#Nigeria some powerless-if-prominent remnants of former monarchies]], however).

to:

And no, Nigeria does not actually have a prince. (It prince or any kind of official royal family. It does have [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_current_constituent_African_monarchs#Nigeria some powerless-if-prominent remnants of former tribal monarchies]], however).but Nigeria has been a federal republic ever since declaring independence from Great Britain in the 1960's.
28th Mar '16 7:10:02 PM WillKeaton
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' [[http://penny-arcade.com/comic/2003/03/28 here]].

to:

* ''Webcomic/PennyArcade'' [[http://penny-arcade.com/comic/2003/03/28 here]].here.]]
28th Mar '16 7:09:13 PM WillKeaton
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The song by MCFrontalot in the page quote. See also [[http://frontalot.com/index.php/content.php?page=lyrics&lyricid=19 there]].

to:

* The song by MCFrontalot in the page quote. See also [[http://frontalot.com/index.php/content.php?page=lyrics&lyricid=19 there]].there.]]
2nd Mar '16 12:32:19 PM MsChibi
Is there an issue? Send a Message


It typically takes the form of someone under a false identity contacting a member of the public and asking them in [[{{Engrish}} suspiciously shaky English]] for assistance in moving a large sum of money via their bank accounts or by presenting themselves as legal heirs to it. The reason given for the contact varies, but typically the money is in a sealed account, locked trust fund, and so on, which the sender of the email cannot retrieve directly. The mark is promised a substantial share (usually 10% or more) of the millions in the account once the money is liberated. Another variant is to claim the victim has won a lottery they never participated in. Yet another is to claim that a LongLostRelative of the victim living abroad has passed away, [[UnexpectedInheritance leaving a substantial amount]] to the potential victim, provided he/she is willing to pay fees to "speed things along," or fix some sort of legal snafu.

to:

It typically takes the form of someone under a false identity contacting a member of the public and asking them in [[{{Engrish}} suspiciously shaky English]] for assistance in moving a large sum of money via their bank accounts or by presenting themselves as legal heirs to it. The reason given for the contact varies, but typically the money is in a sealed account, locked trust fund, and so on, which the sender of the email cannot retrieve directly. The mark is promised a substantial share (usually 10% or more) of the millions in the account once the money is liberated. Another variant is to claim the victim has won a lottery (typically a foreign lottery) they never participated in. Yet another is to claim that a LongLostRelative of the victim living abroad has passed away, [[UnexpectedInheritance leaving a substantial amount]] to the potential victim, provided he/she is willing to pay fees to "speed things along," or fix some sort of legal snafu.



The "Nigerian" variant is ''not quite'' a DeadHorseTrope yet; if revelations on scambaiter and British football forums are anything to go by, as a measure of public opinion. Recently, the 419 scam has been spotted with Syria as the country of origin, which is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment unfortunately plausible]] as the current civil war continues. Stereotypes regarding the Middle East (oil, sheiks, etc.) and reports of defectors from the Assad regime may lure the already-susceptible even faster. Also, bizarrely, the UnitedKingdom and UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates are also responsible for this scam.

to:

The "Nigerian" variant is ''not quite'' a DeadHorseTrope yet; if revelations on scambaiter and British football forums are anything to go by, as a measure of public opinion. Recently, the 419 scam has been spotted with Syria as the country of origin, which is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment unfortunately plausible]] as the current civil war continues. Stereotypes regarding the Middle East (oil, sheiks, etc.) and reports of defectors from the Assad regime may lure the already-susceptible even faster. Also, bizarrely, the UnitedKingdom and UsefulNotes/TheUnitedStates are also responsible for this scam.
scam. Although ''most'' missives of this nature come to prospective marks as emails, the scam has been around for ''much'' [[OlderThanTheyThink longer than that]], coming as snail-mail. (Some scammers ''do'' still send them as snail-mail, or a similar phone call, particularly to [[http://fraud.org/learn/older-adult-fraud/they-can-t-hang-up elderly people]] who may not use email.)
This list shows the last 10 events of 195. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FourOneNineScam