History Main / ForeignCultureFetish

22nd Apr '17 1:07:00 PM Jhonny
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* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedastal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "[[TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s.

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* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedastal BrokenPedestal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "[[TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s.
22nd Apr '17 1:06:30 PM Jhonny
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* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the Mexican-American war (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedastal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "[[TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s.

to:

* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the Mexican-American war UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedastal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "[[TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s.
21st Apr '17 6:14:20 PM TristanJeremiah
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* Scandinavia and the Nordic countries get a lot of this. If it's not a general fascination with Vikings and such things, it is most probably admiration of the Nordic welfare system. In the 50s and 60s, Swedish movies, especially those of Creator/IngmarBergman, were highly popular and successful in America and Europe. Music is also important, with some foreign Metalheads in particular, who seem to believe that the famous Black Metal and Death Metal scenes of Norway and Sweden respectively, are totally mainstream and played on pop radio. It isn't so--Remember that although Sweden produced half the forerunners of melodic death metal, it also produced Music/{{ABBA}}. And after ABBA Sweden has never ceased being insanely successful at (and obsessed with) the Series/EurovisionSongContest, which has earned them a lot of admiration and envy.

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* Scandinavia and the Nordic countries get a lot of this. If it's not a general fascination with Vikings and such things, it is most probably admiration of the Nordic welfare system. In the 50s and 60s, Swedish movies, especially those of Creator/IngmarBergman, Creator/{{Ingmar Bergman}}, were highly popular and successful in America and Europe. Music is also important, with some foreign Metalheads in particular, who seem to believe that the famous Black Metal and Death Metal scenes of Norway and Sweden respectively, are totally mainstream and played on pop radio. It isn't so--Remember that although Sweden produced half the forerunners of melodic death metal, it also produced Music/{{ABBA}}. And after ABBA Sweden has never ceased being insanely successful at (and obsessed with) the Series/EurovisionSongContest, which has earned them a lot of admiration and envy.



* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the Mexican-American war (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedastal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "American dream are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/Nicaragua became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s.

to:

* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the Mexican-American war (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedastal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "American dream "[[TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/Nicaragua UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s.
19th Apr '17 3:46:58 PM DavidDelony
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** Until [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys the Iraq War and even earlier]], America used to be big Francophiles. One can trace this as far back as Creator/BenjaminFranklin and UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson's time as ambassadors in Paris, but in the early 20th Century, American writers, jazz musicians (white and black) would often go to UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. This led to the Lost Generation glorified by Creator/ErnestHemingway. French stars like Charles Boyer, Maurice Chevalier and Yves Montand were highly popular in America, as was later Brigitte Bardot. Many MGM musicals like ''Film/AnAmericanInParis'' and ''Film/{{Gigi}}'' are set in Paris. Among college intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, Creator/RolandBarthes, Simone de Beauvoir and Creator/AlbertCamus were all the rage, likewise the NewHollywood was described by its film-makers as the TransAtlanticEquivalent of the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave.

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** Until [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys the Iraq War and even earlier]], America used to be big Francophiles. One can trace this as far back as Creator/BenjaminFranklin and UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson's time as ambassadors in Paris, but in the early 20th Century, American writers, jazz musicians (white and black) would often go to UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. This led to the Lost Generation glorified by Creator/ErnestHemingway. French stars like Charles Boyer, Maurice Chevalier and Yves Montand were highly popular in America, as was later Brigitte Bardot. Many MGM musicals like ''Film/AnAmericanInParis'' and ''Film/{{Gigi}}'' are set in Paris. Among college intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, Creator/RolandBarthes, Simone de Beauvoir and Beauvoir, Creator/AlbertCamus and Michel Foucault were all the rage, likewise rage. Likewise the NewHollywood was described by its film-makers as the TransAtlanticEquivalent of the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave.
17th Apr '17 2:42:04 PM MBI
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/TheLastKingOfScotland'' gets its name from its subject Idi Amin's real-life love of Scottish culture. "The Last King of Scotland" is a real title Amin gave himself.
15th Apr '17 3:31:35 PM nombretomado
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* Mentioned at one point in ''SomethingPositive'' (other than the whole "smite the {{catgirl}}s" thing) by one of the characters after she scared off some guy with a CallingYourAttacks moment: she says adding "Ancient Secret Chinese technique" will scare opponents off much more effectively, adding "White people are so much fun" or words to that effect.
** Likewise, there's a strip where [=PeeJee=] and Aubrey (both Asian) mock GwenStefani's pop adoption of Japanese memetics, complete with having four "Harajuku girls" who follow her around and aren't ever referred to by their real names. [=PeeJee=] suggests the girls are likely "tutoring" Stefani in Japanese -- "Seeing a withered little pop star trying to order sushi in Japanese and instead telling the waiter about her intense venereal disease would be better than any Christmas bonus I've ever received."

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* Mentioned at one point in ''SomethingPositive'' (other ''Webcomic/SomethingPositive''
** (Other
than the whole "smite the {{catgirl}}s" thing) thing), mentioned by one of the characters after she scared off some guy with a CallingYourAttacks moment: she says adding "Ancient Secret Chinese technique" will scare opponents off much more effectively, adding "White people are so much fun" or words to that effect.
** Likewise, there's There's a strip where [=PeeJee=] and Aubrey (both Asian) mock GwenStefani's pop adoption of Japanese memetics, complete with having four "Harajuku girls" who follow her around and aren't ever referred to by their real names. [=PeeJee=] suggests the girls are likely "tutoring" Stefani in Japanese -- "Seeing a withered little pop star trying to order sushi in Japanese and instead telling the waiter about her intense venereal disease would be better than any Christmas bonus I've ever received."
8th Apr '17 9:58:42 AM Xtifr
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** As a result of colonialism, the English developed fads for the cultures of conquered lands, whether in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}}, UsefulNotes/{{Africa}} and UsefulNotes/{{Australia}}. Tropes like MightyWhitey, the GreatWhiteHunter and AdventureArchaeologist date from the fiction of this era, chiefly the works of Creator/RudyardKipling and Creator/HRiderHaggard. Later writers like Creator/JosephConrad and E. M. Forster would deal with the same tropes in a more critical and darker light.

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** As a result of colonialism, the English developed fads for the cultures of conquered lands, whether in UsefulNotes/{{India}}, UsefulNotes/{{Egypt}}, UsefulNotes/{{Africa}} and UsefulNotes/{{Australia}}. Tropes like MightyWhitey, the GreatWhiteHunter and AdventureArchaeologist date from the fiction of this era, chiefly the works of Creator/RudyardKipling and Creator/HRiderHaggard. Later writers like Creator/JosephConrad and E. M. Forster Creator/EMForster would deal with the same tropes in a more critical and darker light.
2nd Apr '17 8:12:37 PM AthenaBlue
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!!Examples:



* In ''Film/AnotherTimeAnotherPlace'', Janie falls in the love with the new and exciting culture that the Italian [=POWs=] bring to her austere village.
* ''Film/DjangoUnchained'' has Candie, who has one for the French. Strangely, it only extends to [[InsistentTerminology being called]] ''[[GratuitousFrench Monsieur]]'' Candie and naming a slave after a character from ''Literature/TheThreeMusketeers'', he can't speak or understand French. When Schultz has to tell him that Creator/AlexandreDumas was black (by the standards back then, having a black grandfather was enough), he doesn't take it well.
* Leroy Green in ''Film/TheLastDragon'' is an African-American man who displays a whole lot more interest in Asian culture than just learning Kung Fu.



* Leroy Green in ''Film/TheLastDragon'' is an African-American man who displays a whole lot more interest in Asian culture than just learning Kung Fu.
* ''Film/DjangoUnchained'' has Candie, who has one for the French. Strangely, it only extends to [[InsistentTerminology being called]] ''[[GratuitousFrench Monsieur]]'' Candie and naming a slave after a character from ''Literature/TheThreeMusketeers'', he can't speak or understand French. When Schultz has to tell him that Creator/AlexandreDumas was black (by the standards back then, having a black grandfather was enough), he doesn't take it well.
* In ''Film/AnotherTimeAnotherPlace'', Janie falls in the love with the new and exciting culture that the Italian [=POWs=] bring to her austere village.






* ''Literature/{{Tinker}}'': Windwolf is fascinated by human cultures, which is one of the reasons why he's the highest-ranking elf who deals with the humans on a regular basis, as Viceroy of the Westernlands.






* Curzon and Jadzia Dax from ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' were both enamored of Klingon culture- Curzon is a legend among Klingons and Jadzia married Worf and joined the House of Martok. Ezri Dax, the next incarnation, was less fond of Klingon culture (she retches at the sight of gagh), and had a much more critical eye if the Empire, pointing out the vast amounts of hypocrisy and corruption among a people that claimed to be "honorable".

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* Curzon ''Series/DoctorWho'':
** The Doctor appears to have a massive ''thing'' about 19[[superscript:th]]/20[[superscript:th]] century British culture, always using a [[AliensOfLondon British accent]] of [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents some kind]] (generally Received Pronunciation but ' he's been Scottish, Cockney, Manc
and Jadzia Dax from ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' were both enamored of Klingon culture- Curzon is a legend among Klingons posh-Scouse in some incarnations) and Jadzia married Worf usually dressing in a combination of 19th/early 20th and joined late 20th fashion (SeventiesHair and knitwear over Creator/OscarWilde Victorian clothes! A 1940s leather jacket over a modern jumper and black jeans! A 1920s-style suit with a {{Hipster}} influence! A Nineties-style suit with a 1930s trenchcoat!). He always seems to hang around this era and place, and praises it a lot. Both the House of Martok. Ezri Dax, Fifth and Eighth Doctor have referred to themselves as either almost-English or honorary-English. Susan displays one too, getting very excited about whatever pop music is in the next incarnation, was less fond charts, and mentioning a lot how being in 20th Century England has been the best time in her life.
** According to Susan, the First Doctor has a massive thing about UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, and says it is his favourite period in history. The Doctor takes great pleasure in this story indulging in a bit
of Klingon {{Cosplay}} and roleplaying as locals rather than [[ChangedMyJumper just being blatantly anachronistic as usual]]. The Tenth Doctor also inhereted this trait, having a bit of a fetish for anything French.
** The English develop a fetish for Dalek
culture (she retches at in the sight audio story "Jubilee". Since Daleks are ANaziByAnyOtherName, this is extremely problematic.
** The Third Doctor seems to particularly like Venusian culture; a master
of gagh), Venusian lullabies, Venusian hopscotch and had a much more critical eye if the Empire, pointing out the vast amounts of hypocrisy and corruption among a people that claimed to be "honorable".Venusian aikido.



* 'Series/DoctorWho'':
** The Doctor appears to have a massive ''thing'' about 19th/20th Century English culture, always using a [[AliensOfLondon British accent]] of [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents some kind]] (generally Received Pronunciation but ' he's been Scottish, Cockney, Manc and posh-Scouse in some incarnations) and usually dressing in a combination of 19th/early 20th and late 20th fashion (SeventiesHair and knitwear over Creator/OscarWilde Victorian clothes! A 1940s leather jacket over a modern jumper and black jeans! A 1920s-style suit with a {{Hipster}} influence! A Nineties-style suit with a 1930s trenchcoat!). He always seems to hang around this era and place, and praises it a lot. Both the Fifth and Eighth Doctor have referred to themselves as either almost-English or honorary-English. Susan displays one too, getting very excited about whatever pop music is in the charts, and mentioning a lot how being in 20th Century England has been the best time in her life.
** According to Susan, the First Doctor has a massive thing about UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, and says it is his favourite period in history. The Doctor takes great pleasure in this story indulging in a bit of {{Cosplay}} and roleplaying as locals rather than [[ChangedMyJumper just being blatantly anachronistic as usual]]. The Tenth Doctor also inhereted this trait, having a bit of a fetish for anything French.
** The English develop a fetish for Dalek culture in the audio story "Jubilee". Since Daleks are ANaziByAnyOtherName, this is extremely problematic.
** The Third Doctor seems to particularly like Venusian culture; a master of Venusian lullabies, Venusian hopscotch and Venusian aikido.

to:

* 'Series/DoctorWho'':
** The Doctor appears to have a massive ''thing'' about 19th/20th Century English culture, always using a [[AliensOfLondon British accent]] of [[UsefulNotes/BritishAccents some kind]] (generally Received Pronunciation but ' he's been Scottish, Cockney, Manc
Curzon and posh-Scouse in some incarnations) Jadzia Dax from ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' were both enamored of Klingon culture- Curzon is a legend among Klingons and usually dressing in a combination of 19th/early 20th Jadzia married Worf and late 20th fashion (SeventiesHair and knitwear over Creator/OscarWilde Victorian clothes! A 1940s leather jacket over a modern jumper and black jeans! A 1920s-style suit with a {{Hipster}} influence! A Nineties-style suit with a 1930s trenchcoat!). He always seems to hang around this era and place, and praises it a lot. Both joined the Fifth and Eighth Doctor have referred to themselves as either almost-English or honorary-English. Susan displays one too, getting very excited about whatever pop music is in House of Martok. Ezri Dax, the charts, and mentioning a lot how being in 20th Century England has been the best time in her life.
** According to Susan, the First Doctor has a massive thing about UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, and says it is his favourite period in history. The Doctor takes great pleasure in this story indulging in a bit
next incarnation, was less fond of {{Cosplay}} and roleplaying as locals rather than [[ChangedMyJumper just being blatantly anachronistic as usual]]. The Tenth Doctor also inhereted this trait, having a bit of a fetish for anything French.
** The English develop a fetish for Dalek
Klingon culture in (she retches at the audio story "Jubilee". Since Daleks are ANaziByAnyOtherName, this is extremely problematic.
** The Third Doctor seems to particularly like Venusian culture; a master
sight of Venusian lullabies, Venusian hopscotch gagh), and Venusian aikido.had a much more critical eye if the Empire, pointing out the vast amounts of hypocrisy and corruption among a people that claimed to be "honorable".



** The Air Acolytes are Non-benders who took up the Air Nomad culture under the leadership of Avatar Aang. A few of them appear to worship the ground that Tenzin and his family walk on. After Harmonic Convergence happened, at least one of them became an actual air-bender. Lets just say that he was extremely enthusiastic about it.

to:

** The Air Acolytes are Non-benders non-benders who took up the Air Nomad culture under the leadership of Avatar Aang. A few of them appear to worship the ground that Tenzin and his family walk on. After Harmonic Convergence happened, at least one of them became an actual air-bender. Lets airbender. Let's just say that he was extremely enthusiastic about it.
29th Mar '17 8:50:12 PM trixus
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* The Gaulic chief Aplusbégalix ([[BoxingEpisode Cassius Ceramix]] in English) from ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' has this for the Roman empire. Even if it makes no sense. "We'll build an aqueduct even if we don't need one, because it's ROMAN!"

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* The Gaulic chief Aplusbégalix ([[BoxingEpisode Cassius Ceramix]] in English) from ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'' has this for the Roman empire. Even if it makes no sense. "We'll build an aqueduct even if we don't need one, because it's ROMAN!"ROMAN!" The Roman BigBad even jokes that if all Gauls were like him it's the Romans who would look Gaulic.
19th Mar '17 9:54:02 PM karstovich2
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* There were a number of Scottish fads in 19th century England. The first was the fad of the 1820s-30s kicked off by Sir Walter Scott (about which see elsewhere on this page); another fad was in the 1870s-80s, possibly triggered by how much time [[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria the Queen]] spent there in her first decade and a half of widowhood.

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* There were a number of Scottish fads in 19th century England. The first was the fad of the 1820s-30s kicked off by Sir Walter Scott (about which see elsewhere on this page); another fad was in the 1870s-80s, possibly triggered by how much time [[UsefulNotes/QueenVictoria the Queen]] spent there in her first decade and a half of widowhood.after Prince Albert died (Balmoral Castle had been Albert's personal project before his passing).
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ForeignCultureFetish