History Main / ForeignCultureFetish

18th Nov '17 7:25:30 PM wootzits
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* ''Film/{{Barbarella}}'': Dildano is a [[AlwaysChaoticEvil Sogoite]] who believes that MySpeciesDothProtestTooMuch. He thinks of Earth as the "planet revolutions" and is very admiring of its culture (this being set in the far future where Earth has become ultra-pacifistic). His attempt at a revolution in Sogo is inspired by Earth history and he enjoys partaking in other aspects of the culture, while deriding his own as savage.
7th Nov '17 4:28:09 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* The character John Connor spends a good deal of the film ''Film/RisingSun'' pontificating about how noble Japanese culture is.
** Which is rather amusing considering that the rather {{Anvilicious}} WordOfGod (according to the literal AuthorTract at the end of the book) is that Americans should beware Japan's rising power (remember this was written before their economic bubble burst).

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* The character John Connor spends a good deal of the film ''Film/RisingSun'' pontificating about how noble effective and powerful Japanese culture is.
** Which is rather amusing considering that
is. Ironically, the rather {{Anvilicious}} WordOfGod (according to the literal AuthorTract at the end point of the book) is that Americans should beware Japan's rising power (remember this was written before their economic bubble burst).not to compliment Japan but to warn American readers of the threat the nation posed to 1990s America.
5th Nov '17 5:59:15 PM JulianLapostat
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--> '''Caesar''': "Our ancestors, Fathers of the Senate, were never lacking either in wisdom or courage, and yet pride did not keep them from adopting foreign institutions, [[DontShootTheMessenger provided they were honourable]]. They took their offensive and defensive weapons from the Samnites, the badges of their magistrates for the most part from the Etruscans. In fine, whatever they found suitable among allies or foes, they put in practice at home with the greatest enthusiasm, [[SincerestFormOfFlattery preferring to imitate rather than envy the successful]]."

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--> '''Caesar''': "Our ancestors, Fathers of the Senate, were never lacking either in wisdom or courage, and yet pride did not keep them from adopting foreign institutions, [[DontShootTheMessenger provided they were honourable]].honourable. They took their offensive and defensive weapons from the Samnites, the badges of their magistrates for the most part from the Etruscans. In fine, whatever they found suitable among allies or foes, they put in practice at home with the greatest enthusiasm, [[SincerestFormOfFlattery preferring to imitate rather than envy the successful]]."
5th Nov '17 5:58:34 PM JulianLapostat
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** UsefulNotes/TheRomanRepublic and its famous army became strong in part because they borrowed ideas, tactics, and concepts from their enemies, neighbours, or wherever they could. Their famous vendetta against Carthage during the UsefulNotes/PunicWars didn't mean they couldn't appreciate the brilliance of the Carthaginian trireme which they reverse-engineered, made their own additions (the famous Corvus bridge) and then took to the seas. The Latin historian Sallust in his ''The War with Catiline'', quotes UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar giving an oration {{Lampshading}} this:
--> '''Caesar''': "Our ancestors, Fathers of the Senate, were never lacking either in wisdom or courage, and yet pride did not keep them from adopting foreign institutions, [[DontShootTheMessenger provided they were honourable]]. They took their offensive and defensive weapons from the Samnites, the badges of their magistrates for the most part from the Etruscans. In fine, whatever they found suitable among allies or foes, they put in practice at home with the greatest enthusiasm, [[SincerestFormOfFlattery preferring to imitate rather than envy the successful]]."
30th Oct '17 12:44:36 PM KizunaTallis
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** Modern day South Koreans have a thing for the United States, and a lot of them wish to visit the country and enjoy its culture.

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** Modern day South Koreans have a thing for the United States, and a lot of them wish to visit the country and enjoy its culture. British culture also has its fans in the peninsula.



** African-American Communist Paul Robeson, in post WWII US, firmly believed everything was better in the USSR, including the treatment of minorities. Destalinization was a big blow to his reputation and prestige though he remained widely admired by the African-American community who, understandably, were far less partisan on the Cold War debate. Communism was in theory an anti-racist and anti-colonialist ideology, since it argued that class was the true root of all bigotry, and Stalin occassionally exploited this to score propaganda points [[note]]via his invitation to all American Blacks to come to the USSR (though this was as much to shame the United States and show the USSR to be morally superior), and the Chinese Communists' "tractor women", who were women trained in a traditionally male field, using the tractor. It's also why there have been close ties to Communism and both America's Civil Rights Movement and Second Wave Feminism. Robeson was not acting on a cultural fetish so much as ideology and willful blindness. He extended this selective blindness to both Mao in China and Castro in Cuba.[[/note]] On the plus side, he sang many Russian and Soviet songs in English, including [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtU3vUOa2sw the Soviet State Anthem]] among others.
** Ironically by the time of the 50s and 60s, the USSR itself had lost considerable prestige among former allies. The Cubans, namely Che Guevara felt that the Soviet Union was backsliding and becoming too comfortable for its own good. Destalinization alienated Mao Zedong in China, while the Vietnamese always saw their Communism as rooted in local and nationalistic interest rather than the international vision of the Soviets. By the time of TheSixties, Western intellectuals were more interested in UsefulNotes/CheGuevara and Ho Chi Minh than Kruschev and other internal struggles. In France, during May'68, a number of young French leftists became fond of Mao and glorified the Cultural Revolution, much to their later regret.

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** African-American Communist Paul Robeson, in post WWII US, firmly believed everything was better in the USSR, including the treatment of minorities. Destalinization was a big blow to his reputation and prestige though he remained widely admired by the African-American community who, understandably, were far less partisan on the Cold War debate. Communism was in theory an anti-racist and anti-colonialist ideology, since it argued that class was the true root of all bigotry, and Stalin occassionally occasionally exploited this to score propaganda points [[note]]via his invitation to all American Blacks to come to the USSR (though this was as much to shame the United States and show the USSR to be morally superior), and the Chinese Communists' "tractor women", who were women trained in a traditionally male field, using the tractor. It's also why there have been close ties to Communism and both America's Civil Rights Movement and Second Wave Feminism. Robeson was not acting on a cultural fetish so much as ideology and willful blindness. He extended this selective blindness to both Mao in China and Castro in Cuba.[[/note]] On the plus side, he sang many Russian and Soviet songs in English, including [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtU3vUOa2sw the Soviet State Anthem]] among others.
** Ironically by the time of the 50s and 60s, the USSR itself had lost considerable prestige among former allies. The Cubans, namely Che Guevara Guevara, felt that the Soviet Union was backsliding and becoming too comfortable for its own good. Destalinization alienated Mao Zedong in China, while the Vietnamese always saw their Communism as rooted in local and nationalistic interest rather than the international vision of the Soviets. By the time of TheSixties, Western intellectuals were more interested in UsefulNotes/CheGuevara and Ho Chi Minh than Kruschev and other internal struggles. In France, during May'68, a number of young French leftists became fond of Mao and glorified the Cultural Revolution, much to their later regret.



* The United States being a large UsefulNotes/MeltingPot has had a history of interest with all kinds of different European and Asian cultures.
** The USA has its Anglophiles. Generally, they love British accents, UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily, and often focus on the Britain of an earlier time (usually, UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain through to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII or so). ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' is pretty much perfect for them, likewise British "Indie Rock" (more known as "pop-rock" stateside), ''Literature/HarryPotter'' and other fantasy fiction, and {{Steampunk}} are highly popular among millennials. Creator/WaltDisney is said to have been an Anglophile, which possibly explains why so many Disney films made during his lifetime were set in Britain and/or adapted from classic British literature.
** Until [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys the Iraq War and even earlier]], America used to be big Francophiles. One can trace this as far back as Creator/BenjaminFranklin and UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson's time as ambassadors in Paris, but in the early 20th Century, American writers, jazz musicians (white and black) would often go to UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. This led to the Lost Generation glorified by Creator/ErnestHemingway. French stars like Creator/CharlesBoyer, Creator/MauriceChevalier and Creator/YvesMontand were highly popular in America, as was later Brigitte Bardot. Many MGM musicals like ''Film/AnAmericanInParis'' and ''Film/{{Gigi}}'' are set in Paris. Among college intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, Creator/RolandBarthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Creator/AlbertCamus and Michel Foucault were all the rage. Likewise the NewHollywood was described by its film-makers as the TransAtlanticEquivalent of the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. As late as the eighties and nineties, US humanities departments tended to regard French philosophy as Divinely inspired and inerrant.
** The United States has always been fascinated by Asia, especially the Far East of China and Japan. The USA of course played a major role in UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}'s history, via the arrival of Commodore Perry's "black ships" and aspects of Japanese culture and media (particularly their films and manga) have been constantly invoked, either by singing its praises or by [[AccentuateTheNegative emphasizing]] [[ValuesDissonance its]] [[PedoHunt negative]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII aspects]] as well. In the case of UsefulNotes/{{China}}, Americans naturally confuse different eras of China, and China with Taiwan and Hong Kong, but Kung-Fu, Chinese Food (or the local version thereof) and aspects of Chinese fashion and culture remain common reference points for America.

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* The United States States, being a large UsefulNotes/MeltingPot UsefulNotes/MeltingPot, has had a history of interest with all kinds of different European and Asian cultures.
** The USA has its Anglophiles. Generally, they love British accents, UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily, and often focus on the Britain of an earlier time (usually, UsefulNotes/VictorianBritain through to UsefulNotes/WorldWarII or so). ''Series/DowntonAbbey'' is pretty much perfect for them, likewise British TV shows, "Indie Rock" (more known as "pop-rock" stateside), ''Literature/HarryPotter'' and other fantasy fiction, and {{Steampunk}} are highly popular among millennials. Creator/WaltDisney is said to have been an Anglophile, which possibly explains why so many Disney films made during his lifetime were set in Britain and/or adapted from classic British literature.
** Until [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys the Iraq War and even earlier]], America used to be big Francophiles. One can trace this as far back as Creator/BenjaminFranklin and UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson's time as ambassadors in Paris, but in the early 20th Century, American writers, jazz musicians (white and black) would often go to UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. This led to the Lost Generation glorified by Creator/ErnestHemingway. French stars like Creator/CharlesBoyer, Creator/MauriceChevalier and Creator/YvesMontand were highly popular in America, as was later Brigitte Bardot. Many MGM musicals like ''Film/AnAmericanInParis'' and ''Film/{{Gigi}}'' are set in Paris. Among college intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, Creator/RolandBarthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Creator/AlbertCamus and Michel Foucault were all the rage. Likewise the NewHollywood was described by its film-makers as the TransAtlanticEquivalent of the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. As late as the eighties and nineties, US humanities departments tended to regard French philosophy as Divinely divinely inspired and inerrant.
** The United States has always been fascinated by Asia, especially the Far East of China and Japan. The USA of course played a major role in UsefulNotes/{{Japan}}'s history, via the arrival of Commodore Perry's "black ships" and aspects of Japanese culture and media (particularly their films and manga) have been constantly invoked, either by singing its praises or by [[AccentuateTheNegative emphasizing]] [[ValuesDissonance its]] [[PedoHunt negative]] [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII aspects]] as well. In the case of UsefulNotes/{{China}}, Americans naturally confuse different eras of China, and China with Taiwan and Hong Kong, but Kung-Fu, [[MartialArtsMovie martial arts]], Chinese Food (or the local version thereof) and aspects of Chinese fashion and culture remain common reference points for America. As of TheNewTens, South Korea has gotten in on the game, with Korean food, pop music, and K-Dramas finding a stateside audience.



* As of late, [[UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}} Korea]] is getting more spotlight previously dominated by its neighbors, although to a lesser extent.
* Australia has (had) a very strong Anglophile streak, lessening in the 1970s to be replaced by America, though that's more of a conflicted fandom.
* Oh, and way back in the 70s, everything American was sooo hip in Europe.
* UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}} had a hard on for anything that was ''not'' Russian while the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain was up. Then, after 1989 the foreign stuff started pouring in, and throughout TheNineties people were going crazy for literally ''anything'' that came from west of the border. This eventually led to the development of an ultra-nationalistic cultural (and political) movement around the turn of the millennium.

to:

* As of late, [[UsefulNotes/{{South Korea}} Korea]] is getting more spotlight previously dominated by its neighbors, although to a lesser extent.
* Australia has (had) a very strong Anglophile streak, lessening in the 1970s to be replaced by America, though that's more of a conflicted fandom.
* Oh, and way back in
fandom. Australia itself was on the 70s, everything American was sooo hip in Europe.
receiving end of this by Americans through the 80s with movies like ''Film/CrocodileDundee'' popularizing the AwesomeAussie trope.
* UsefulNotes/{{Hungary}} had a hard on hard-on for anything that was ''not'' Russian while the UsefulNotes/IronCurtain was up. Then, after 1989 the foreign stuff started pouring in, and throughout TheNineties people were going crazy for literally ''anything'' that came from west of the border. This eventually led to the development of an ultra-nationalistic cultural (and political) movement around the turn of the millennium.



* A very touchy example was the glorification of all things Africa by black Americans (mostly in the early- to mid-nineties), most of whom are ''not'' seen as "fellow Africans" by people currently living on that continent, but are rather viewed as simply Americans with darker skin color.
** Especially odd was the use of Swahili by such groups, when it is an East African language that none of the West African slaves would have understood or even heard of. They actually spoke a wide variety of tongues -- Fon, Wolof, Yoruba, Ibo, Fula, etc., but virtually none would have spoken Swahili.
* This trope also tends to occur whenever white people dare to turn a popular aspect of black culture into something TotallyRadical. Note the amount of rock acts in the early Aughties that tried to marry their genre with rap, or cringe-worthy commercials where a "hip grandma" or culturally sensitive college kid would say things like "that's da bomb" or "that's tight" with a straight face.

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* A very touchy example was the glorification of all things Africa by black Americans (mostly in the early- early to mid-nineties), which was particularly odd as most of whom are ''not'' seen as "fellow Africans" by people currently living on that continent, but are rather viewed as simply Americans with a darker skin color.
** Especially odd was the use of Swahili by such groups, when as it is an East African language that none of the West African slaves would have understood or even heard of. They actually spoke a wide variety of tongues -- Fon, Wolof, Yoruba, Ibo, Fula, etc., but virtually none would have spoken Swahili.
* This trope also tends to occur whenever [[PrettyFlyForAWhiteGuy white people people]] dare to turn a popular aspect of black culture into something TotallyRadical. Note the amount of rock acts in the early Aughties late 90s/early 2000s that tried to [[RapRock marry their genre with rap, rap]], or cringe-worthy commercials where a "hip grandma" or culturally sensitive college kid would say things like "that's da bomb" or "that's tight" with a straight face.



** The mangled "Eastern" Spirituality can be detected in the differing views on reincarnation: Westerners view it as a way to return to the world and have a better new life, whereas Easterners view it as a negative cycle that must be broken.
*** There's a reason for this, as the reincarnation isn't an "Eastern" concept as such: there ''were'' a culturally Western faiths with a belief in reincarnation: for example a Pythagorean mysticism, which indeed espoused such views.
** Additionally, most Westerners who accept Buddhism do so because it fits their atheism/agnosticism and Scientific Rationalism. They tend to strip all the supernatural and ceremonial elements out of Buddhism and declare it a philosophy, or say it's something other than a religion. They view traditional Eastern practice of Buddhism as a perversion of Buddha's message, and that Asian cultures have been doing it all wrong. Go over to the discussion section of the other Wiki's article on Buddhism, and you will see a 5+ year argument over the definition of Buddhism. Those who favor describing it as a religion tend to come from Asian cultures (they even cite their own language's wiki).

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** The mangled "Eastern" Spirituality can be detected in the differing views on reincarnation: {{reincarnation}}: Westerners view it as a way to return to the world and have a better new life, whereas Easterners view it as a negative cycle that must be broken.
*** There's a reason for this, as the reincarnation isn't an "Eastern" concept as such: there ''were'' a culturally Western faiths with a belief in reincarnation: for example reincarnation (for example, a Pythagorean mysticism, mysticism) which indeed espoused such views.
** Additionally, most Westerners who accept Buddhism UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} do so because it fits their atheism/agnosticism and Scientific Rationalism. They tend to strip all the supernatural and ceremonial elements out of Buddhism and declare it a philosophy, or say it's something other than a religion. They view traditional Eastern practice of Buddhism as a perversion of Buddha's message, and that Asian cultures have been doing it all wrong. Go over to the discussion section of the other The Other Wiki's article on Buddhism, and you will see a 5+ year argument over the definition of Buddhism. Those who favor describing it as a religion tend to come from Asian cultures (they even cite their own language's wiki).



** Christianity itself is a Middle Eastern religion which caught on with the Romans for, come to think of it, pretty much the same reasons today's Westerners buy into eastern spirituality.

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** Christianity itself is a Middle Eastern religion which caught on with the Romans for, come to think of it, pretty much the same reasons today's Westerners buy into eastern spirituality.



** The essentially same happened among the some parts of the Russian far right, who chose to throw away the intense, bitter Antisemitism that was a traditional trait of the movement, and instead come as downright Zionist. This is for somewhat different reason, though, and has mostly to do with a shift of their object of hatred towards Muslims, perception of [[BadassIsraeli Israelis' "raghead bashing" prowess]], & distaste towards Nazism which did a lot of horrifying things to their nation & homeland.
* And on the other side the more nutty sympathizers with Palestinian extremists (or Iran, or Israel's main enemy ''du jour'') wear the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keffiyeh Kufiya]] without knowing much of its background and call for "solidarity" with Hamas and other groups that - to say it politely - may not share all of their viewpoints. A Western Atheist calling for "support" or "solidarity" for Hamas one day and decrying homophobia and religious violence the next day may come off a bit strange, but then again Hamas cares just as little about ''that'' as the above-mentioned right wing Israelis care about the plans Christian Zionists have after the Messiah comes.

to:

** The same thing essentially same happened among the some parts of the Russian far right, who chose to throw away the intense, bitter Antisemitism that was a traditional trait of the movement, and instead come as downright Zionist. This is for somewhat different reason, reasons, though, and has mostly to do with a shift of their object of hatred towards Muslims, perception of [[BadassIsraeli Israelis' "raghead bashing" prowess]], & and a distaste towards Nazism which did a lot of horrifying things to their nation & homeland.
and peoples.
* And on the other side side, the more nutty sympathizers with Palestinian extremists (or Iran, or Israel's main enemy ''du jour'') wear the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keffiyeh Kufiya]] without knowing much of its background and call for "solidarity" with Hamas and other groups that - to say it politely - may not share all of their viewpoints. A Western Atheist calling for "support" or "solidarity" for Hamas one day and decrying homophobia and religious violence the next day may come off a bit strange, but then again Hamas cares just as little about ''that'' as the above-mentioned right wing Israelis care about the plans Christian Zionists have after the Messiah comes.



* Related to both the Monaco and Israeli fandoms is the long-standing fetishization of "Arabia" and the Bedouin culture in American movie making (the adaptation of ''Literature/TheSheik'' (which starred a Mexican-descent actor as the lord of the burning sands,) and the quasi-historic ''Film/{{Lawrence of Arabia}}'' as only two examples.) In more recent years, some political factions in the USA have gained a deep affinity for Arab and Muslim culture. This has taken a particular edge in the progressive support for the Palestinian side in the on-going conflict - a support that glosses over the significant differences between progressive & fundamentalist Palestinian approaches to homosexuality, women's liberation, and to a lesser degree protection of religious minorities and religious freedom[[note]]Long story short: Palestinians are, as you might expect, quite conservative when it comes to sexual mores; though not as conservative as some of their neighbors (*cough* Saudi *cough*), they're still quite prudish when compared to some of their other neighbors, like the Israelis and Lebanese. Palestinians are generally OK with women working, and the Palestinian left is theoretically committed to equality, but Palestinian culture is still pretty heavily patriarchal. Finally, the degree to which minorities are to be accepted is something of a bone of contention among Palestinian groups: Fatah and the "left" tend to be full-throatedly accepting of freedom of religion (a large percentage of Palestinians ''are'' Christians, and many of the left-wing Palestinian groups, e.g. the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine--who are Communists, at least nominally--have historically had heavy Christian membership), while Hamas' position is more divided (generally advocating religious ''toleration'' in the context of an Islamic society), and many of the Islamist groups to the right of Hamas (e.g. Islamic Jihad) being even more suspicious of minorities (typically advocating that they be required to pay a ''jizya''--a special tax symbolic of their recognition of Muslim rule).[[/note]] among other issues. A closer correspondence to the Monaco fanbase is the new but increasing fanbase for Dubai, with its glittering towers and extreme opulence...based on a lot of exploitation of immigrants and truly abysmal human rights record, plus the glittering towers are ConspicuousConsumption writ large at best and at worst surprisingly tacky, and the whole thing is built on an economic model whose sustainability is subject to serious doubt, but ''world's tallest building'', everyone!

to:

* Related to both the Monaco and Israeli fandoms is the long-standing fetishization of "Arabia" and the Bedouin culture in American movie making (the adaptation of ''Literature/TheSheik'' (which ''Literature/TheSheik'', which starred a Mexican-descent actor as the lord of the burning sands,) sands, and the quasi-historic ''Film/{{Lawrence of Arabia}}'' ''Film/LawrenceOfArabia}}'' as only two examples.) examples). In more recent years, some political factions in the USA have gained a deep affinity for Arab and Muslim culture. This has taken a particular edge in the progressive support for the Palestinian side in the on-going conflict - a support that glosses over the significant differences between progressive & and fundamentalist Palestinian approaches to homosexuality, women's liberation, and to a lesser degree protection of religious minorities and religious freedom[[note]]Long story short: Palestinians are, as you might expect, quite conservative when it comes to sexual mores; though not as conservative as some of their neighbors (*cough* Saudi *cough*), they're still quite prudish when compared to some of their other neighbors, like the Israelis and Lebanese. Palestinians are generally OK with women working, and the Palestinian left is theoretically committed to equality, but Palestinian culture is still pretty heavily patriarchal. Finally, the degree to which minorities are to be accepted is something of a bone of contention among Palestinian groups: Fatah and the "left" tend to be full-throatedly accepting of freedom of religion (a large percentage of Palestinians ''are'' Christians, and many of the left-wing Palestinian groups, e.g. the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine--who are Communists, at least nominally--have historically had heavy Christian membership), while Hamas' position is more divided (generally advocating religious ''toleration'' in the context of an Islamic society), and many of the Islamist groups to the right of Hamas (e.g. Islamic Jihad) being even more suspicious of minorities (typically advocating that they be required to pay a ''jizya''--a special tax symbolic of their recognition of Muslim rule).[[/note]] among other issues. A closer correspondence to the Monaco fanbase is the new but increasing fanbase for Dubai, with its glittering towers and extreme opulence... based on a lot of exploitation of immigrants and truly abysmal human rights record, plus the glittering towers are ConspicuousConsumption writ large at best and at worst surprisingly tacky, and the whole thing is built on an economic model whose sustainability is subject to serious doubt, but ''world's tallest building'', everyone!



* The [[OccidentalOtaku Weeaboo]] have new hipster cousins: Koreaboos. Love for K-pop and Korean food today is similar to love for all things Japanese in the 1990s.
* Scandinavia and the Nordic countries get a lot of this. If it's not a general fascination with Vikings and such things, it is most probably admiration of the Nordic welfare system. In the 50s and 60s, Swedish movies, especially those of Creator/{{Ingmar Bergman}}, were highly popular and successful in America and Europe. Music is also important, with some foreign Metalheads in particular, who seem to believe that the famous Black Metal and Death Metal scenes of Norway and Sweden respectively, are totally mainstream and played on pop radio. It isn't so--Remember that although Sweden produced half the forerunners of melodic death metal, it also produced Music/{{ABBA}}. And after ABBA Sweden has never ceased being insanely successful at (and obsessed with) the Series/EurovisionSongContest, which has earned them a lot of admiration and envy.

to:

* The [[OccidentalOtaku Weeaboo]] have new hipster cousins: Koreaboos. Love for K-pop and Korean food today is similar to love for all things Japanese in the 1990s.
* Scandinavia and the Nordic countries get a lot of this. If it's not a general fascination with Vikings and such things, it is most probably admiration of the Nordic welfare system. In the 50s and 60s, Swedish movies, especially those of Creator/{{Ingmar Bergman}}, were highly popular and successful in America and Europe. Music is also important, with some foreign Metalheads in particular, who seem to believe that the famous Black Metal and Death Metal scenes of Norway and Sweden respectively, are totally mainstream and played on pop radio. It isn't so--Remember that although Sweden produced half the forerunners of melodic death metal, it also produced Music/{{ABBA}}. And after ABBA ABBA, Sweden has never ceased being insanely successful at (and obsessed with) the Series/EurovisionSongContest, which has earned them a lot of admiration and envy.



* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedestal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s. And the ''Communist'' Cuban public of all places still prefer classic American cars dating from the 1950s to more recent Soviet(and later Chinese & Korean) ones.

to:

* Latin America used to be in love with everything American for most of the 20th century, to the point of ignoring Hollywood's [[TheCapitalOfBrazilIsBuenosAires peculiar vision of its culture]]. However, by the ColdWar era, the US' interventionism in domestic matters (leading to totalitarian regimes) led to this fascination to die down in favor of "Latin-Americanism". The only part of American culture still hugely popular down south is Hollywood's blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, other aspects of US culture are popular in Peru and Colombia, which don't hold such grudges against Americans.[[note]]The former had a very left-wing dictatorship in the 70s, while left-wing politics in the latter became discredited by the guerrilla.[[/note]] In general the US was seen as wholly positive and something worth emulating (as seen by the AncientGrome style of government buildings from that era inspired by the Grome-tastic US representative architecture) until at least the UsefulNotes/MexicanAmericanWar (which resulted in ''huge'' amounts of BrokenPedestal in leftist circles, especially in Mexico). The US in general is more popular with right wing Latin Americans than with the left wing, but US popular culture and - for lack of a better term - the "[[UsefulNotes/TheAmericanDream American dream]]" are still immensely popular in Latin America and even when UsefulNotes/{{Nicaragua}} became a Soviet satellite in the 1980s, Russian TV and books were not nearly as popular as US cowboy fare. Series/WalkerTexasRanger is ''still'' shown on Nicaraguan TV in the 2010s. And the ''Communist'' Cuban public of all places still prefer classic American cars dating from the 1950s to more recent Soviet(and Soviet (and later Chinese & Japanese and Korean) ones.



* Celtic cultures, and particularly the Irish culture, have their numerous admirers, too - be it for the richness of those cultures, their fascinating histories or their LaResistance ways when dealing with the Brits. Just one very telling example: Russia, of all places, has a ton of bands playing ''celtic''(ish) folk music.

to:

* Celtic cultures, and particularly the Irish culture, have their numerous admirers, too - be it for the richness of those cultures, their fascinating histories or their LaResistance ways when dealing with the Brits. Just one very telling example: Russia, of all places, has a ton of bands playing ''celtic''(ish) ''Celtic''(ish) folk music.



* South Korea has a strong Anglophile streak, and British TV shows get very high ratings there.
15th Oct '17 3:09:17 PM nombretomado
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** American culture was initially more popular in the Continent than within Britain. Even Creator/CharlesDickens who was highly popular in America, got mileage out of making fun of American culture and society in his novel ''Martin Chuzzlewit'' and his ''American Notes''. It was only at the end of the Victorian Age, thanks to the popularity of Creator/WaltWhitman (more liked in England than in America in this time), Creator/MarkTwain, Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, that the English finally admitted that they liked America after all. Even today, British people, even those critical of its politics, love America and couldn't live without the culture. The BritishInvasion was inspired by American rock and roll and Blues Music, and the Comics invasion of the 80s (Creator/AlanMoore and Co.) was also inspired by their love of American comics[[note]]Many rural areas in the UK have large shopping parks or malls, just like in America, except that the country is far smaller, and the British car culture, while not nearly as strong as America's (Britain's public transport network is too good for that) is still one of the strongest (if not ''the'' strongest) in Europe. Particularly relevant because of the CulturalCringe - many Brits feel that they should be able to live in America as a result of the similarities between culture.[[/note]]

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** American culture was initially more popular in the Continent than within Britain. Even Creator/CharlesDickens who was highly popular in America, got mileage out of making fun of American culture and society in his novel ''Martin Chuzzlewit'' and his ''American Notes''. It was only at the end of the Victorian Age, thanks to the popularity of Creator/WaltWhitman (more liked in England than in America in this time), Creator/MarkTwain, Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show, that the English finally admitted that they liked America after all. Even today, British people, even those critical of its politics, love America and couldn't live without the culture. The BritishInvasion UsefulNotes/TheBritishInvasion was inspired by American rock and roll and Blues Music, and the Comics invasion of the 80s (Creator/AlanMoore and Co.) was also inspired by their love of American comics[[note]]Many rural areas in the UK have large shopping parks or malls, just like in America, except that the country is far smaller, and the British car culture, while not nearly as strong as America's (Britain's public transport network is too good for that) is still one of the strongest (if not ''the'' strongest) in Europe. Particularly relevant because of the CulturalCringe - many Brits feel that they should be able to live in America as a result of the similarities between culture.[[/note]]
7th Oct '17 4:42:08 PM jormis29
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** Until [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys the Iraq War and even earlier]], America used to be big Francophiles. One can trace this as far back as Creator/BenjaminFranklin and UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson's time as ambassadors in Paris, but in the early 20th Century, American writers, jazz musicians (white and black) would often go to UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. This led to the Lost Generation glorified by Creator/ErnestHemingway. French stars like Charles Boyer, Maurice Chevalier and Yves Montand were highly popular in America, as was later Brigitte Bardot. Many MGM musicals like ''Film/AnAmericanInParis'' and ''Film/{{Gigi}}'' are set in Paris. Among college intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, Creator/RolandBarthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Creator/AlbertCamus and Michel Foucault were all the rage. Likewise the NewHollywood was described by its film-makers as the TransAtlanticEquivalent of the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. As late as the eighties and nineties, US humanities departments tended to regard French philosophy as Divinely inspired and inerrant.

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** Until [[CheeseEatingSurrenderMonkeys the Iraq War and even earlier]], America used to be big Francophiles. One can trace this as far back as Creator/BenjaminFranklin and UsefulNotes/ThomasJefferson's time as ambassadors in Paris, but in the early 20th Century, American writers, jazz musicians (white and black) would often go to UsefulNotes/{{Paris}}. This led to the Lost Generation glorified by Creator/ErnestHemingway. French stars like Charles Boyer, Maurice Chevalier Creator/CharlesBoyer, Creator/MauriceChevalier and Yves Montand Creator/YvesMontand were highly popular in America, as was later Brigitte Bardot. Many MGM musicals like ''Film/AnAmericanInParis'' and ''Film/{{Gigi}}'' are set in Paris. Among college intellectuals, Jean-Paul Sartre, Creator/RolandBarthes, Simone de Beauvoir, Creator/AlbertCamus and Michel Foucault were all the rage. Likewise the NewHollywood was described by its film-makers as the TransAtlanticEquivalent of the UsefulNotes/FrenchNewWave. As late as the eighties and nineties, US humanities departments tended to regard French philosophy as Divinely inspired and inerrant.
17th Sep '17 11:07:05 AM nombretomado
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* The United States being a large MeltingPot has had a history of interest with all kinds of different European and Asian cultures.

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* The United States being a large MeltingPot UsefulNotes/MeltingPot has had a history of interest with all kinds of different European and Asian cultures.
9th Sep '17 5:20:03 AM Sakubara
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** Love of Japanese culture is oft mocked on the internet as "Weeabooism", from a MemeticMutation borne of ''ComicStrip/ThePerryBibleFellowship'' comics and an Imageboard word filter for "Japanophile." And it doesn't just refer to [[FanDumb particularly obsessive anime fans]] ("OccidentalOtaku"). Not even the ones who own a few too many [[KatanasAreJustBetter katanas]]. "Weeaboo" means a special brand of obsessive, crazy idiot who believes everything Japanese is superior, and wants to move to Japan and become a video game programmer/anime producer/manga artist/ninja/other hilariously improbable career. Enough of them actually accomplish the moving to Japan part, where their dreams are invariably crushed, to the point where the Japanese themselves have developed a stereotype about them...

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** Love of Japanese culture is oft mocked on the internet as "Weeabooism", from a MemeticMutation borne of ''ComicStrip/ThePerryBibleFellowship'' comics and an Imageboard word filter for "Japanophile." And it doesn't just refer to [[FanDumb particularly obsessive anime fans]] ("OccidentalOtaku"). Not even the ones who own a few too many [[KatanasAreJustBetter katanas]]. "Weeaboo" means a special brand of obsessive, crazy idiot who believes everything Japanese is superior, and wants to move to Japan and become a video game programmer/anime producer/manga artist/ninja/other hilariously improbable career. Enough of them actually accomplish the moving to Japan part, where their dreams are invariably crushed, crushed (with some '''''very''''' rare exceptions), to the point where the Japanese themselves have developed a stereotype about them...
8th Sep '17 5:01:04 AM Adept
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* ''Anime/KiniroMosaic'': The two leads, Alice and Shinobu, both have a fetish for each other's cultures, which ties into their friendship. Shinobu did a homestay at Alice's home in Britain because she loves Western culture so much, and Alice then moves to Japan both to be with Shinobu and experience Japanese culture.

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* ''Anime/KiniroMosaic'': ''Manga/KiniroMosaic'': The two leads, Alice and Shinobu, both have a fetish for each other's cultures, which ties into their friendship. Shinobu did a homestay at Alice's home in Britain because she loves Western culture so much, and Alice then moves to Japan both to be with Shinobu and experience Japanese culture.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ForeignCultureFetish