History Main / FootballHooligans

22nd Sep '16 10:54:52 PM BattleMaster
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* Mentioned in several ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' sourcebooks, mostly that rioting football crowds are a very convenient way for runners to cover up other crimes.
11th Sep '16 5:27:57 AM themisterfree
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* ''ComicStrip/USAcres'': Some strips had UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball as a theme. [[http://garfield.com/us-acres/1998-08-25 In this one]], Lanolin showed the área where the parking lot would be. She explained that's where that'd hold "the fight after the game". Her face held an expression she was looking forward to that moment.

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* ''ComicStrip/USAcres'': Some strips had UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball as a theme. [[http://garfield.com/us-acres/1998-08-25 [[https://garfield.com/usacres/1987/08/25 In this one]], Lanolin showed the área where the parking lot would be. She explained that's where that'd hold "the fight after the game". Her face held an expression she was looking forward to that moment.
28th Aug '16 7:23:58 AM WillBGood
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* [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] gets out of a sticky situation when a demon had fused four hooligans together to kill him, while retaining their personalities. Unfortunately for the demon's plans, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny two were for Chelsea, the other two for Arsenal]]. They start beating the crap out of themselves, allowing John to escape.

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* [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] gets out of a sticky situation when a demon had fused four hooligans together to kill him, while retaining their personalities. Unfortunately for the demon's plans, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny two were for Chelsea, the other two for Arsenal]]. They start beating the crap out of themselves, themselves (ultimately ripping themselves apart), allowing John to escape.
5th Aug '16 7:48:52 PM karstovich2
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** Basketball example: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacers%E2%80%93Pistons_brawl the Pacers-Pistons brawl]], aka "The Malice at the Palace", which started as a fight between players before a UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Pistons fan threw a drink at Indiana Pacers player Ron Artest, causing the fight to spill into the stands. Artest and eight other players were suspended without pay for a total of 146 games, five of them were convicted of assault on top of it, and five fans received lifetime bans from Pistons home games.

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** Basketball example: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacers%E2%80%93Pistons_brawl the Pacers-Pistons brawl]], aka "The Malice at the Palace", which started as a fight between players before a UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Pistons fan threw a drink at Indiana Pacers player Ron Artest, causing the fight to spill into the stands. Artest and eight other players were suspended without pay for a total of 146 games, five of them were convicted of assault on top of it, and five fans received lifetime bans from Pistons home games.[[note]]Artest later changed his name to "Metta World Peace." The irony of this change--especially given that besides the Malice, Artest/World Peace had previously been convicted of domestic violence--was lost on no one. That being said, he does seem to have mellowed out since then.[[/note]]
5th Aug '16 7:41:32 PM karstovich2
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However, football was also the ''perfect'' sport for television, with an easy-to-see ball, relatively predictable game length, built-in commercial breaks between downs, and a great deal of action and drama on plays. While baseball was the perfect sport for radio, with its slow pace offering lots of room for commentary, it had a lot of trouble readily adapting to the new medium of television (particularly with the drama and length issues); it wasn't until TheSeventies when sports broadcasters really figured out how to make baseball games on TV exciting. As a result, the football execs started to build new stadiums and try to attract a different audience--the middle-class suburban folks with [=TVs=]. Thompson was understandably dismayed.

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However, football was also the ''perfect'' sport for television, with an easy-to-see ball, relatively predictable game length, built-in commercial breaks between downs, and a great deal of action and drama on plays. While baseball was the perfect sport for radio, with its slow pace offering lots of room for commentary, it had a lot of trouble readily adapting to the new medium of television (particularly with the drama and length issues); it wasn't until TheSeventies when sports broadcasters really figured out how to make baseball games on TV exciting.exciting (by focusing heavily on player movement rather than anything else, e.g. the ball). As a result, the football execs started to build new stadiums and try to attract a different audience--the middle-class suburban folks with [=TVs=]. Thompson was understandably dismayed.
5th Aug '16 7:35:15 PM karstovich2
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* The UrExample to sports hooliganism in Europe may be the chariot races that took place in AncientRome and the later UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire. Racers back then would be divided into teams based on the uniform colors they wore and their fans and spectators would likewise align themselves into these different camps. Much like modern football clubs, the fanbases would often be identified not just by which racing team they rooted for but also by cultural and sociopolitical issues beyond just the sport and thus, riots breaking out during games were not uncommon whenever tensions ran high. The most infamous example of these was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nika_riots Nika riots]] in Constantinople. A fight between the "Green" and "Blue" chariot teams' fans quickly escalated into city-wide riots that killed over 30,000 people, ''burned down the Hagia Sophia'', and nearly toppled the government of Emperor Justinian. Talk about BreadAndCircuses GoneHorriblyWrong.

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* The UrExample to sports hooliganism in Europe may be the chariot races that took place in AncientRome and the later UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire. Racers back then would be divided into teams based on the uniform colors they wore wore--Red, White, Blue, and Green--and their fans and spectators would likewise align themselves into these different camps. Much like modern football clubs, the fanbases would often be identified not just by which racing team they rooted for but also by cultural and sociopolitical issues beyond just the sport and thus, riots breaking out during games were not uncommon whenever tensions ran high. The most infamous example of these was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nika_riots Nika riots]] in Constantinople. A fight between the fans of the "Green" and "Blue" chariot teams' fans teams (by then the only ones of significance, the "Reds" and "Whites" having small bases and aligned with the "Greens" and "Blues" respectively) quickly escalated into city-wide riots that killed over 30,000 people, ''burned down the Hagia Sophia'', and nearly toppled the government of Emperor Justinian. Talk about BreadAndCircuses GoneHorriblyWrong.
19th May '16 7:38:24 AM XFllo
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** The Croatian war of independence also arguably started with [[http://bit.ly/aZxjsX a football riot]]. And in a related conflict, the Bosnian war, a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serb_Volunteer_Guard paramilitary Yugoslav group]] consisted of hooligan supporters of Red Star Belgrade.

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** * The Croatian war of independence also arguably started with [[http://bit.ly/aZxjsX a football riot]]. And in a related conflict, the
* The
Bosnian war, a [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serb_Volunteer_Guard paramilitary Yugoslav group]] consisted of hooligan supporters of Red Star Belgrade.
19th May '16 7:35:59 AM XFllo
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* RealLife semi-example: Winnie Mandela's bodyguards (read: armed thugs) were known as "Mandela United Football Club" and were modelled on one.



* As stated above, English Football became the most iconic example of hooliganism during the 80's. Almost every club had 'firms' who would arrange punch ups with opposing firms from other sides. This would cumulate in the disaster at Heysel, at the time the whole game was a mess, with stadia crumbling and not being up to standards (to the extent that, barely a fortnight before the Heysel disaster, 56 fans had perished in an horrific grandstand fire at Bradford City's Valley Parade stadium) and loose regulations about drinking for example. Measures put into place like catch fencing would lead to Hillsbrough where even more people died. The Taylor Report which arose from those events called for several new rules and regulations like no alcohol allowed inside the stands and all seater stadiums. Despite the occasional riot breaking out the problem has been all but solved.

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* As stated above, English Football became the most iconic example of hooliganism during the 80's. Almost every club had 'firms' who would arrange punch ups with opposing firms from other sides. This would cumulate in the disaster at Heysel, at the time the whole game was a mess, with stadia crumbling and not being up to standards (to the extent that, barely a fortnight before the Heysel disaster, 56 fans had perished in an horrific grandstand fire at Bradford City's Valley Parade stadium) and loose regulations about drinking for example. Measures put into place like catch fencing would lead to Hillsbrough where even more people died. The Taylor Report which arose from those events called for several new rules and regulations like no alcohol allowed inside the stands and all seater stadiums. Despite the occasional riot breaking out the problem has been all but solved.
16th May '16 7:08:21 PM Bissek
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* According to the ''Literature/DresdenFiles'' short story "Last Call", this phenomenon is caused by maenads putting enchantments on craft beers served at sporting events. Dresden had to stop them when they tried to do this with several cases of Mac's beer meant to be served at a Bulls game.
4th May '16 10:53:58 PM Kreyser
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* In Indonesia, many soccer clubs have this, resulting frequently in full-blown riots. Some notorious examples are from Jakarta (The Jak or Jakmania as ''Persija'' (''Persatuan Sepak Bola Jakarta'')fans club), Surabaya (Bonek, the MOST notorious among them all, as fans club of ''Persebaya'' (''Persatuan Sepak Bola Surabaya'')), Bandung (Bobotoh and Viking, both are fans of ''Persib'' alias ''Persatuan Sepak Bola Bandung''), and Malang (Aremania, the fans of ''Arema''). Since Jakarta and Bandung are pretty close to one another as well as Surabaya and Malang pair, any match involving those pair of cities can get pretty violent
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