History Main / FootballHooligans

24th Mar '17 7:07:44 AM DarkPhoenix94
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An UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball supporter who arguably takes the "support" part more seriously than the football. Portrayals (and RealLife examples) tend to range along a sliding scale of criminal behaviour. Some are fans who've gotten drunk and found themselves in a BarBrawl, while others are organised "firms" -- gangs formed on the basis, not of ethnicity or home turf, but of the members' favoured team. Strongly associated with the UK, but [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Football_hooliganism as pointed out]] on [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]], prevalent all over the world -- even [[http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2005/dec/07/ussport.football within the US]], at least according to ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers The Guardian]]''. Hooliganism was so rife in 1980's England (for example, contributing to disasters like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heysel_Stadium_Disaster Heysel]]) that UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher formed a "war cabinet" to deal with the problem; ironically, measures put in place to stop it resulted in the tragedy at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillsborough_disaster Hillsborough]]. Thankfully, further measures put in place have all but stamped this problem out.

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An UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball supporter who arguably takes the "support" part more seriously than the football. Portrayals (and RealLife examples) tend to range along a sliding scale of criminal behaviour. Some are fans who've gotten drunk and found themselves in a BarBrawl, while others are organised "firms" -- gangs formed on the basis, not of ethnicity or home turf, but of the members' favoured team. Strongly associated with the UK, but [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Football_hooliganism as pointed out]] on [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]], prevalent all over the world -- even [[http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2005/dec/07/ussport.football within the US]], at least according to ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers The Guardian]]''. Hooliganism was so rife in 1980's England (for example, contributing to disasters like [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heysel_Stadium_Disaster Heysel]]) that UsefulNotes/MargaretThatcher formed a "war cabinet" to deal with the problem; ironically, in a bitter irony, measures put in place to stop it resulted in the tragedy at [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillsborough_disaster Hillsborough]]. Hillsborough]], which was blamed on hooligans by the government, the police and ''[[UsefulNotes/BritishNewspapers The Sun]]'', which printed the notorious 'The Truth' headline to smear fans. Thankfully, further measures put in place as a result of the 1990 Taylor Report have all but stamped this problem out.
out and British police are considered to be ''the'' experts worldwide on handling hooliganism.



** Specifically, he's talking about [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillsborough_disaster the Hillsborough Disaster]] where 96 deaths were caused by failures in crowd control leading to a dangerous crush. This was not actually caused by hooliganism, but measures that had been taken to curb hooliganism contributed in large part. Specifically sections of the stadium (called pens) were fenced off from each other to keep fans from clashing. Improper crowd control had officials directing more and more people into a single pen as the game was starting. As there was nowhere to go, people were crushed to death.

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** Specifically, he's talking about [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hillsborough_disaster the Hillsborough Disaster]] where 96 deaths were caused by failures in crowd control leading to a dangerous crush. This was not actually caused by hooliganism, hooliganism (though everyone blamed it on hooligans), but measures that had been taken to curb hooliganism contributed in large part. Specifically sections of the stadium (called pens) were fenced off from each other to keep fans from clashing. Improper crowd control had officials directing more and more people into a single pen as the game was starting. As there was nowhere to go, people were crushed to death.



* The popular table football game ''TabletopGame/{{Subbuteo}}'' incorporated a lot of clever marketing gimmicks which meant if you had enough time and money, you could buy from a formidable catalgue of extras that meant your tabletop footballers could eventually turn out in their own stadium, complete with stands, working footlights, scoreboards, advertising hoardings, TV crews, St John's ambulancemen, cigar-smoking manager and subs in the dugout, policemen, stewards, programme salesmen, pie stall.... some fans of the game turned their Subbuteo playing areas into an art-form not unlike model railway layouts. Whilst the official Subbuteo vendor sold fans in packets of fifty to populate your model terraces, other enterprising and strictly unofficial vendors added topics the licenced dealers frowned on. In the form of Subbuteo soccer hooligans and [[http://www.subbuteoworld.co.uk/media/subbuteoworld/splash8.jpg streakers]] (male and female; photo is SFW) that in an expanded rule set could be randomly deployed to disrupt matches... fully equipped riot policemen soon followed.

to:

* The popular table football game ''TabletopGame/{{Subbuteo}}'' incorporated a lot of clever marketing gimmicks which meant if you had enough time and money, you could buy from a formidable catalgue catalogue of extras that meant your tabletop footballers could eventually turn out in their own stadium, complete with stands, working footlights, scoreboards, advertising hoardings, TV crews, St John's ambulancemen, cigar-smoking manager and subs in the dugout, policemen, stewards, programme salesmen, pie stall.... some fans of the game turned their Subbuteo playing areas into an art-form not unlike model railway layouts. Whilst the official Subbuteo vendor sold fans in packets of fifty to populate your model terraces, other enterprising and strictly unofficial vendors added topics the licenced dealers frowned on. In the form of Subbuteo soccer hooligans and [[http://www.subbuteoworld.co.uk/media/subbuteoworld/splash8.jpg streakers]] (male and female; photo is SFW) that in an expanded rule set could be randomly deployed to disrupt matches... fully equipped riot policemen soon followed.



** In the episode "Marge Gamer," Lisa joins a soccer team (with Homer as a ref) and "flops" her way out of penalties and such. When called out on it, she watches a documentary about about flopping in a game that caused a riot. The riot lasted for ''23 years''. In Brazil, a riot broke out that was so severe, it enough to make a statue of the Virgin Mary come to life and "beat the living snot out of everyone."

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** In the episode "Marge Gamer," Lisa joins a soccer team (with Homer as a ref) and "flops" her way out of penalties and such. When called out on it, she watches a documentary about about flopping in a game that caused a riot. The riot lasted for ''23 years''. In Brazil, a riot broke out that was so severe, it was enough to make a statue of the Virgin Mary come to life and "beat the living snot out of everyone."



* The UrExample to sports hooliganism in Europe may be the chariot races that took place in AncientRome and the later UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire. Racers back then would be divided into teams based on the uniform colors they wore--Red, White, Blue, and Green--and their fans and spectators would likewise align themselves into these different camps. Much like modern football clubs, the fanbases would often be identified not just by which racing team they rooted for but also by cultural and sociopolitical issues beyond just the sport and thus, riots breaking out during games were not uncommon whenever tensions ran high. The most infamous example of these was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nika_riots Nika riots]] in Constantinople. A fight between the fans of the "Green" and "Blue" chariot teams (by then the only ones of significance, the "Reds" and "Whites" having small bases and aligned with the "Greens" and "Blues" respectively) quickly escalated into city-wide riots that killed over 30,000 people, ''burned down the Hagia Sophia'', and nearly toppled the government of Emperor Justinian. Talk about BreadAndCircuses GoneHorriblyWrong.

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* The UrExample to sports hooliganism in Europe may be the chariot races that took place in AncientRome and the later UsefulNotes/ByzantineEmpire. Racers back then would be divided into teams based on the uniform colors they wore--Red, White, Blue, and Green--and their fans and spectators would likewise align themselves into these different camps. Much like modern football clubs, the fanbases would often be identified not just by which racing team they rooted for but also by cultural and sociopolitical issues beyond just the sport and thus, riots breaking out during games were not uncommon whenever tensions ran high. The most infamous example of these was the [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nika_riots Nika riots]] in Constantinople. A fight between the fans of the "Green" and "Blue" chariot teams (by then the only ones of significance, the "Reds" and "Whites" having small bases and aligned with the "Greens" and "Blues" respectively) quickly escalated into city-wide riots that killed over 30,000 people, ''burned down the Hagia Sophia'', and nearly toppled the government of Emperor Justinian.Justinian, only being put down by the intervention of General Belisarius who put them down by killing over ''30,000'' people. Talk about BreadAndCircuses GoneHorriblyWrong.



* English Football became the most iconic example of hooliganism during the 80's. Almost every club had 'firms' who would arrange punch ups with opposing firms from other sides. This would cumulate in the disaster at Heysel, at the time the whole game was a mess, with stadia crumbling and not being up to standards (to the extent that, barely a fortnight before the Heysel disaster, 56 fans had perished in an horrific grandstand fire at Bradford City's Valley Parade stadium) and loose regulations about drinking for example. Measures put into place like catch fencing would lead to Hillsbrough where even more people died. The Taylor Report which arose from those events called for several new rules and regulations like no alcohol allowed inside the stands and all seater stadiums. Despite the occasional riot breaking out the problem has been all but solved.

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* English Football became the most iconic example of hooliganism during the 80's.80's, to the point where it became known as 'La Malaise Anglaise'. Almost every club had 'firms' who would arrange punch ups with opposing firms from other sides. This would cumulate culminate in the disaster at Heysel, at the time the whole game was a mess, with stadia crumbling and not being up to standards (to the extent that, barely a fortnight before the Heysel disaster, 56 fans had perished in an horrific grandstand fire at Bradford City's Valley Parade stadium) and loose regulations about drinking for example. Measures put into place like catch fencing would lead to Hillsbrough where even more people died. The Taylor Report which arose from those events called for several new rules and regulations regulations, like no alcohol allowed inside the stands and all seater stadiums. Despite That, much better policing, travel bans on known hooligans looking to cause trouble abroad and clubs being very quick to ban hooligans from club property for life to protect the occasional riot breaking out new family friendly image, has all contributed to the phoenix like resurrection of English football, resulting in the globally popular financial juggernaut of the UsefulNotes/EnglishPremierLeague. Indeed, the problem has been all but solved.solved, with crowd trouble being a distinct rarity, and British police are known worldwide as ''the'' experts on crowd trouble.


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* Russian fans have an extremely bad reputation as football hooligans, to the point where they're steadily displacing English fans in the popular image of the football hooligan - ironically, their football firms are heavily modelled off English hooligan firms.


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* On a similar note, the Old Firm match-up between Rangers and Celtic is notorious for violence and sectarian chanting, being intimately intertwined with UsefulNotes/TheTroubles - it got to the point where renowned BBC War Correspondent Kate Adie noted that you could tell when riots and protests were going to start and finish by looking at the respective fixture lists.
8th Dec '16 9:32:06 AM LondonKdS
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* The third volume of ''ComicBook/{{Stumptown}}'' features the Timbers Army, the...shall we say ''spirited'' fans of the Portland Timbers. Scenes set at the opening Portland/Seattle game have Timbers chants as a wall of words that take up a fair amount of the background of every scene, advocating the burning down of Seattle in its entirety. And then a Timbers fan gets assaulted after the game...

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* The third volume of ''ComicBook/{{Stumptown}}'' features the Timbers Army, the...shall we say ''spirited'' fans of the Portland Timbers. Scenes set at the opening Portland/Seattle game have Timbers chants as a wall of words that take up a fair amount of the background of every scene, advocating the burning down of Seattle in its entirety. And then a Timbers fan gets assaulted after the game... The league are terrified by this, as they tolerate aggressive chanting but know that any hint of real European- or Latin American-style violent hooliganism will probably destroy the sport again for a generation.
3rd Dec '16 7:50:52 PM WillBGood
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* The popular table football game ''TabletopGame/{{Subbuteo}}'' incorporated a lot of clever marketing gimmicks which meant if you had enough time and money, you could buy from a formidable catalgue of extras that meant your tabletop footballers could eventually turn out in their own stadium, complete with stands, working footlights, scoreboards, advertising hoardings, TV crews, St John's ambulancemen, cigar-smoking manager and subs in the dugout, policemen, stewards, programme salesmen, pie stall.... some fans of the game turned their Subbuteo playing areas into an art-form not unlike model railway layouts. Whilst the official Subbuteo vendor sold fans in packets of fifty to populate your model terraces, other enterprising and strictly unofficial vendors added topics the licenced dealers frowned on. In the form of Subbuteo soccer hooligans and streakers (male and female) that in an expanded rule set could be randomly deployed to disrupt matches... fully equipped riot policemen soon followed.

to:

* The popular table football game ''TabletopGame/{{Subbuteo}}'' incorporated a lot of clever marketing gimmicks which meant if you had enough time and money, you could buy from a formidable catalgue of extras that meant your tabletop footballers could eventually turn out in their own stadium, complete with stands, working footlights, scoreboards, advertising hoardings, TV crews, St John's ambulancemen, cigar-smoking manager and subs in the dugout, policemen, stewards, programme salesmen, pie stall.... some fans of the game turned their Subbuteo playing areas into an art-form not unlike model railway layouts. Whilst the official Subbuteo vendor sold fans in packets of fifty to populate your model terraces, other enterprising and strictly unofficial vendors added topics the licenced dealers frowned on. In the form of Subbuteo soccer hooligans and streakers [[http://www.subbuteoworld.co.uk/media/subbuteoworld/splash8.jpg streakers]] (male and female) female; photo is SFW) that in an expanded rule set could be randomly deployed to disrupt matches... fully equipped riot policemen soon followed.
2nd Dec '16 2:27:08 PM DRCEQ
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** In the episode "Marge Gamer," Lisa joins a soccer team (with Homer as a ref) and "flops" her way out of penalties and such. When called out on it, she watches a documentary about about flopping in a game that caused a riot. The riot lasted for ''23 years''. It was enough to make a statue of the Virgin Mary come to life and "beat the living snot out of everyone."

to:

** In the episode "Marge Gamer," Lisa joins a soccer team (with Homer as a ref) and "flops" her way out of penalties and such. When called out on it, she watches a documentary about about flopping in a game that caused a riot. The riot lasted for ''23 years''. It In Brazil, a riot broke out that was so severe, it enough to make a statue of the Virgin Mary come to life and "beat the living snot out of everyone."
5th Nov '16 8:58:09 PM DRCEQ
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** More rioting soccer fans in the episode "Marge Gamer," where Lisa watches a documentary about them. It's enough to make a statue of the Virgin Mary come to life and "beat the living snot out of everyone."

to:

** More rioting soccer fans in In the episode "Marge Gamer," where Lisa joins a soccer team (with Homer as a ref) and "flops" her way out of penalties and such. When called out on it, she watches a documentary about them. It's about flopping in a game that caused a riot. The riot lasted for ''23 years''. It was enough to make a statue of the Virgin Mary come to life and "beat the living snot out of everyone."


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* One episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheAngryBeavers'' has Daggett and Norbert acting like various European stereotypes. Dagget acts like a hooligan, ranting on about how it doesn't matter how the game itself plays out, because there will always a fight afterward.
22nd Sep '16 10:54:52 PM BattleMaster
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* Mentioned in several ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' sourcebooks, mostly that rioting football crowds are a very convenient way for runners to cover up other crimes.
11th Sep '16 5:27:57 AM themisterfree
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* ''ComicStrip/USAcres'': Some strips had UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball as a theme. [[http://garfield.com/us-acres/1998-08-25 In this one]], Lanolin showed the área where the parking lot would be. She explained that's where that'd hold "the fight after the game". Her face held an expression she was looking forward to that moment.

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* ''ComicStrip/USAcres'': Some strips had UsefulNotes/AssociationFootball as a theme. [[http://garfield.com/us-acres/1998-08-25 [[https://garfield.com/usacres/1987/08/25 In this one]], Lanolin showed the área where the parking lot would be. She explained that's where that'd hold "the fight after the game". Her face held an expression she was looking forward to that moment.
28th Aug '16 7:23:58 AM WillBGood
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* [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] gets out of a sticky situation when a demon had fused four hooligans together to kill him, while retaining their personalities. Unfortunately for the demon's plans, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny two were for Chelsea, the other two for Arsenal]]. They start beating the crap out of themselves, allowing John to escape.

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* [[ComicBook/{{Hellblazer}} John Constantine]] gets out of a sticky situation when a demon had fused four hooligans together to kill him, while retaining their personalities. Unfortunately for the demon's plans, [[CrowningMomentOfFunny two were for Chelsea, the other two for Arsenal]]. They start beating the crap out of themselves, themselves (ultimately ripping themselves apart), allowing John to escape.
5th Aug '16 7:48:52 PM karstovich2
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** Basketball example: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacers%E2%80%93Pistons_brawl the Pacers-Pistons brawl]], aka "The Malice at the Palace", which started as a fight between players before a UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Pistons fan threw a drink at Indiana Pacers player Ron Artest, causing the fight to spill into the stands. Artest and eight other players were suspended without pay for a total of 146 games, five of them were convicted of assault on top of it, and five fans received lifetime bans from Pistons home games.

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** Basketball example: [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacers%E2%80%93Pistons_brawl the Pacers-Pistons brawl]], aka "The Malice at the Palace", which started as a fight between players before a UsefulNotes/{{Detroit}} Pistons fan threw a drink at Indiana Pacers player Ron Artest, causing the fight to spill into the stands. Artest and eight other players were suspended without pay for a total of 146 games, five of them were convicted of assault on top of it, and five fans received lifetime bans from Pistons home games.[[note]]Artest later changed his name to "Metta World Peace." The irony of this change--especially given that besides the Malice, Artest/World Peace had previously been convicted of domestic violence--was lost on no one. That being said, he does seem to have mellowed out since then.[[/note]]
5th Aug '16 7:41:32 PM karstovich2
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However, football was also the ''perfect'' sport for television, with an easy-to-see ball, relatively predictable game length, built-in commercial breaks between downs, and a great deal of action and drama on plays. While baseball was the perfect sport for radio, with its slow pace offering lots of room for commentary, it had a lot of trouble readily adapting to the new medium of television (particularly with the drama and length issues); it wasn't until TheSeventies when sports broadcasters really figured out how to make baseball games on TV exciting. As a result, the football execs started to build new stadiums and try to attract a different audience--the middle-class suburban folks with [=TVs=]. Thompson was understandably dismayed.

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However, football was also the ''perfect'' sport for television, with an easy-to-see ball, relatively predictable game length, built-in commercial breaks between downs, and a great deal of action and drama on plays. While baseball was the perfect sport for radio, with its slow pace offering lots of room for commentary, it had a lot of trouble readily adapting to the new medium of television (particularly with the drama and length issues); it wasn't until TheSeventies when sports broadcasters really figured out how to make baseball games on TV exciting.exciting (by focusing heavily on player movement rather than anything else, e.g. the ball). As a result, the football execs started to build new stadiums and try to attract a different audience--the middle-class suburban folks with [=TVs=]. Thompson was understandably dismayed.
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