History Main / Flynning

30th Mar '17 8:46:29 AM Bissek
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* Parodied in ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' OVA "Jeffrey's Knighthood". Jeffrey Mailstar, an inept and unskilled warrior, does ridiculous Flynning every time he tries swordplay (the opponent just stands there with weapon readied and watches Jeffrey repeatedly hitting his sword). Most real swordfights between skilled swordsmen (Gourry, Zangulus, etc) in this anime are either a few stop-shots of parries followed by a SingleStrokeBattle, or a showdown of sword magic abilities.

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* Parodied in ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' OVA "Jeffrey's Knighthood". Jeffrey Mailstar, an inept and unskilled warrior, does ridiculous Flynning every time he tries swordplay (the opponent just stands there with weapon readied and watches Jeffrey repeatedly hitting his sword).sword, or sometimes empty air). Most real swordfights between skilled swordsmen (Gourry, Zangulus, etc) in this anime are either a few stop-shots of parries followed by a SingleStrokeBattle, or a showdown of sword magic abilities.
20th Mar '17 8:33:23 PM Doodler
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Added DiffLines:

** The subsequent series, ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' and ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsRebels'', have varying degrees of this, but an especially harsh aversion to the trope happens in the ''Rebels'' episode "Twin Suns" [[spoiler:in Obi-Wan and Maul's finale duel]], which is decided in three strikes. Supplementary material for the episode even notes that real sword fights tend to end quickly, and the speed of the battle was to show that [[spoiler:Obi-Wan]] was a true MasterSwordsman.
18th Mar '17 2:41:40 PM jtierney50
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* The three-way fight between Sparrow, Turner and Norrington in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest''. However other sword fights in this trilogy are portrayed far more realistically.

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* The three-way fight between Sparrow, Turner and Norrington in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest''. However most other sword fights in this trilogy are portrayed far more realistically.realistically, although duels between main characters tend to have decent amounts of Flynning.
** The duel between Jack Sparrow and Will Turner in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanTheCurseOfTheBlackPearl'' in Will's blacksmith shop. Neither is trying to kill the other: Sparrow just wants to escape, having entered the shop so that he could hide from his pursuers, and Turner wants to apprehend Sparrow so that he can actually get some credit for something for once. The result? A lot of fancy swordplay and use of the environment (the fight eventually even goes up into the rafters) with no one really aiming to harm the other. It eventually ends when Sparrow pulls his gun on Turner, who claims that he's cheated by using a gun.
** Later in the film, when Barbossa and Jack fight, it devolves into great amounts of Flynning when it's revealed that [[spoiler:Jack stole a piece of gold and cannot die, meaning that neither can physically kill the other.]]
** The fight between Davy Jones and Jack Sparrow in ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanAtWorldsEnd''. It involves lots of Jack's trademark "if I wasn't crazy, this probably wouldn't work" tactics to escape the immortal and unkillable Jones, including but not limited to swinging from the rigging, using the chest as an impromptu weapon, and Flynning on the crossbar holding up the mainsail, all of which occurs on a ship that is sailing on the side of a massive whirlpool.
10th Mar '17 12:25:19 AM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, in live-action at least, so that non-expert actors can put on an entertaining show without causing RealLife injuries. The first problem is that most actors can't fence, and most fencers can't act. Neither skill is something you can teach someone properly in a short amount of time, so choreographers have try their best to teach actors how to pretend. Generally they learn the sequence of moves in a fight by rote without a good understanding the underlying principles behind it. There is limited time to rehearse fights, and it's not uncommon for a last-minute change to the script to throw any progress up to that point out the window. This leads into the second problem: most stage and screen fights are done without face protection, and the risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. Actors make their living with their bodies, and any injury that forces them to take time off of work or blemishes their appearance can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, to the point where if the party in charge of that sees you doing something dangerous with their actor they'll throw a fit. With this in mind, it's all too understandible that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury.

Even when you factor out the problems of live actors, flynning still has its uses. Real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]], so you end up with fights where swords clash but nobody dies. Another issue is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, and it doesn't have to look flashy if it works. In contrast, a choreographer often has to contrive a way for a fight to be as drawn out and flashy as possible, all while keeping the action comprehensible to the audience. Many highly effective real life techniques are either BoringButPractical, subtle enough that average audience members wouldn't understand what they were seeing, or so effective that the fight scene would end in an {{anticlimax}}. Finally, there is simply the fact that most writers, artists, and animators don't know how to fence, and if they do seek out advice it will often be from the same choreographers and stuntpersons who serve theater, film, and television. Thus, the same flynning moves tend to show up across all kinds of media. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps when trying to enjoy a sword fight based on Flynning; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin any enjoyment of most Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things.

to:

Flynning exists, in live-action at least, so that non-expert actors can put on an entertaining show without causing RealLife injuries. The first problem is that most actors can't fence, and most fencers can't act. Neither skill is something you can teach someone properly in a short amount of time, so choreographers have try their best to teach actors how to pretend. Generally they learn the sequence of moves in a fight by rote without a good understanding of the underlying principles behind it. There is limited time to rehearse fights, and it's not uncommon for a last-minute change to the script to throw any progress up to that point out the window. This leads into the second problem: most stage and screen fights are done without face protection, and the risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. Actors make their living with their bodies, and any injury that forces them to take time off of work or blemishes their appearance can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, to the point where if the party in charge of that sees you doing something dangerous with their actor they'll throw a fit. With this in mind, it's all too understandible that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury.

injury. Awkward prop weapons and costumes can be hard to work with too, and sometimes an important actor has some injury or disability that has to be covered up with flynning.

Even when you factor out the problems of live actors, flynning still has its uses. Real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]], so you end up with fights where swords clash but nobody dies. Another issue is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, and it doesn't have to look flashy if it works. In contrast, a choreographer often has to contrive a way for a fight to be as drawn out and flashy as possible, all while keeping the action comprehensible to the audience. Many highly effective real life techniques are either BoringButPractical, subtle enough that average audience members wouldn't understand what they were seeing, or so effective that the fight scene they would make a dramatic duel end in an {{anticlimax}}. a premature {{anticlimax}}.

Finally, there is simply the fact that most writers, artists, and animators don't know how to fence, and if they do seek out advice it will often be from the same choreographers and stuntpersons who serve theater, film, and television. Thus, the same flynning moves tend to show up across all kinds of media. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps when trying to enjoy a sword fight based on Flynning; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin any enjoyment of most Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things.
10th Mar '17 12:04:49 AM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the '''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]''' page for a detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is a ''lot'' harder than it sounds.

WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps when trying to enjoy a sword fight based on Flynning; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin any enjoyment of most Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves, and not because they weren't seriously trying to wound each other, but it's not easy to recreate those conditions in a fictional performance.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage in live-action at least, to make it look like two people are fighting so that non-expert actors can put on an entertaining show without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and injuries. The first problem is that most actors don't can't fence, and most fencers can't act. Neither skill is something you can teach someone properly in a short amount of time, so choreographers have stunt doubles. In fact, if try their best to teach actors how to pretend. Generally they learn the audience sees sequence of moves in a fight by rote without a good understanding the underlying principles behind it. There is limited time to rehearse fights, and it's not uncommon for a last-minute change to the script to throw any progress up to that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about point out the scene window. This leads into the second problem: most stage and begin to worry genuinely for screen fights are done without face protection, and the ''actors'' and risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. Actors make their safety. It's also done because real living with their bodies, and any injury that forces them to take time off of work or blemishes their appearance can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, to the point where if the party in charge of that sees you doing something dangerous with their actor they'll throw a fit. With this in mind, it's all too understandible that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury.

Even when you factor out the problems of live actors, flynning still has its uses. Real
combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason children]], so you end up with fights where swords clash but nobody dies. Another issue is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but it doesn't have to look flashy if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the it works. In contrast, a choreographer often has to contrive various ways a way for the combatants to a fight continuously without to be as drawn out and flashy as possible, all while keeping the action comprehensible to the audience. Many highly effective real life techniques are either one landing a telling hit until BoringButPractical, subtle enough that average audience members wouldn't understand what they were seeing, or so effective that the script calls for it. See fight scene would end in an {{anticlimax}}. Finally, there is simply the '''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]''' page for a detailed discussion fact that most writers, artists, and animators don't know how to fence, and if they do seek out advice it will often be from the same choreographers and stuntpersons who serve theater, film, and television. Thus, the same flynning moves tend to show up across all kinds of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is a ''lot'' harder than it sounds.

media. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps when trying to enjoy a sword fight based on Flynning; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin any enjoyment of most Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves, and not because they weren't seriously trying to wound each other, but it's not easy to recreate those conditions in a fictional performance.
things.



Compare ATeamFiring, where instead of lots of sword clashing with nobody getting cut you have lots of bullets flying but nobody getting shot. Contrast SingleStrokeBattle, where both fighters are clearly aiming to kill with their first strike and which can be over in an instant. See also AnachronismStew as swords and sword fighting techniques shown on film tend to be hundreds of years ahead of what would have been available in the time setting of a medieval film.[[note]]Might be a case of AcceptableBreaksFromReality, given that most cultures kept only haphazard records of their martial arts. On the flipside, some films use anachronistic techniques when there's a knowledge base concerning the techniques they ''did'' use.[[/note]] For details on how to depict sword fighting more accurately, see our UsefulNotes pages on UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship and UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}.

to:

Compare ATeamFiring, where instead of lots of sword clashing with nobody getting cut you have lots of bullets flying but nobody getting shot. Contrast SingleStrokeBattle, where both fighters are clearly aiming to kill with their first strike and which can be over in an instant. See also AnachronismStew as swords and sword fighting techniques shown on film tend to be hundreds of years ahead of what would have been available in the time setting of a medieval film.[[note]]Might be a case of AcceptableBreaksFromReality, given that most cultures kept only haphazard records of their martial arts. On the flipside, some films use anachronistic techniques when there's a knowledge base concerning the techniques they ''did'' use.[[/note]] For details on how to depict sword fighting more accurately, see our UsefulNotes pages on UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship and UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}.
UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}. See the '''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]''' page for a detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is a ''lot'' harder than it sounds.
9th Mar '17 10:36:14 PM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the '''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]''' page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is much harder than it sounds.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the '''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]''' page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is much a ''lot'' harder than it sounds.
9th Mar '17 10:35:37 PM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the ''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]'' page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is much harder than it sounds.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the ''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]'' '''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]''' page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is much harder than it sounds.
9th Mar '17 10:35:18 PM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the [[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]] page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is harder than it sounds.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. See the [[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]] ''[[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]]'' page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is much harder than it sounds.
9th Mar '17 10:34:45 PM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of frenetic movement and drawn out to several exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it. \n See the [[Analysis/{{Flynning}} Analysis]] page for a much more detailed discussion of why getting realistic fights on stage or film is harder than it sounds.



This trope is named for the swashbuckler film star ErrolFlynn, whose movies were full of this kind of fighting. It is worth noting that, as some of the examples below illustrate, quite a number of his colleagues in early 20th century Hollywood actually ''were'' expert fencers, but rather than go for realistic fights they used their knowledge to produce something that [[RuleOfCool just looked cool]] instead.

to:

This trope is named for the swashbuckler film star ErrolFlynn, Creator/ErrolFlynn, whose movies were full of this kind of fighting. It is worth noting that, as some of the examples below illustrate, quite a number of his colleagues in early 20th century Hollywood actually ''were'' expert fencers, but rather than go for realistic fights they used their knowledge to produce something that [[RuleOfCool just looked cool]] instead.
23rd Feb '17 3:44:49 PM FaxModem1
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Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''Film/ByTheSword'', as they follow the rules of fencing rather closely, and are trying to follow the rules of the sport, not the actual rules of combat. The real duel at the end is an actual swordfight, with both combatants trying to kill each other, and making stabs into each other, until the duel ends.
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