2 Hours Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History Main / Flynning

25th May '16 1:30:30 PM TheBigBopper
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It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves, but it's not easy to recreate those conditions in a fictional performance.

to:

It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves, and not because they weren't seriously trying to wound each other, but it's not easy to recreate those conditions in a fictional performance.
25th May '16 1:29:04 PM TheBigBopper
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It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves; the question is how you simulate that convincingly with actors.

to:

It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves; the question is how you simulate that convincingly with actors.
themselves, but it's not easy to recreate those conditions in a fictional performance.
25th May '16 1:23:41 PM TheBigBopper
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It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to end the fight as quickly and efficiently as possible, and there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves; the question is how you simulate that convincingly with actors.

to:

It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to end take the fight as quickly shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and efficiently as possible, and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves; the question is how you simulate that convincingly with actors.
25th May '16 1:15:57 PM TheBigBopper
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It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to end the fight as quickly and efficiently as possible, and there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it.

In theatrics, this is known as "Pirate Halves", so named because you see it so much in pirate movies ("halves", because you're basically making a half-circle with your sword with each parry, meeting at the top and bottom of each arc -- a similar move, "Pirate Fulls", is when you're making a 360° arc with each swing to meet at the bottom of each swing). Often in pirate and swashbuckling movies they wouldn't have the time (or the budget) to give everyone in the film sword fighting lessons, so they'd give some lessons to the lead actors, and tell all the extras in the background, "just do this."

to:

It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to end the fight as quickly and efficiently as possible, and there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it. \n\n Interestingly, [[RealityIsUnrealistic there have actually been a few duels recorded in history]] that lasted an inordinately long time because both participants were very good at defending themselves; the question is how you simulate that convincingly with actors.

In theatrics, the endless parry/riposte exchange often used to achieve this is known as called "Pirate Halves", so named Halves": "pirate" because you see it so much in pirate movies ("halves", movies, and "halves" because you're basically making a half-circle with your sword with each parry, meeting at the top and bottom of each arc -- a (a similar move, "Pirate Fulls", is when you're making a 360° arc with each swing to meet at the bottom of each swing). Often in pirate and swashbuckling movies they wouldn't have the time (or the budget) to give everyone in the film sword fighting lessons, so they'd give some lessons to the lead actors, and tell all the extras in the background, "just do this."
25th May '16 12:53:52 PM TheBigBopper
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It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]]

to:

It is used, on stage at least, to make sure no one actually gets hurt; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief helps; conversely, a working knowledge of any school of swordsmanship can easily ruin all enjoyment of Hollywood sword fights for the 0.0001% of the population who both know and care about such things. (It's also important to note that, on stage, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety.) It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]]
]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to end the fight as quickly and efficiently as possible, and there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it.



Named for swashbuckler film star ErrolFlynn. Worth noting that, as some of the examples below illustrate, quite a number of his colleagues in early 20th century Hollywood actually ''were'' expert fencers, but rather than go for realistic fights they used their knowledge to produce something that [[RuleOfCool just looks cool]] instead.

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Named This trope is named for the swashbuckler film star ErrolFlynn. Worth It is worth noting that, as some of the examples below illustrate, quite a number of his colleagues in early 20th century Hollywood actually ''were'' expert fencers, but rather than go for realistic fights they used their knowledge to produce something that [[RuleOfCool just looks cool]] instead.
25th May '16 8:31:02 AM NativeJovian
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* ''Series/StudioC'' parodies this in "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGv7Cc7zpAE Fencing: Slow-mo Replay]]" where there's a modern fencing match that is over in two seconds, but when you watch the slow-mo replay, it becomes an epic battle in a banquet hall including a DamselInDistress, ExcuseMeWhileIMultitask, [[ImplausibleFencingPowers slicing candles in half]], and [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning spinning]], all of which are lampshaded.

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* ''Series/StudioC'' parodies this in "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xGv7Cc7zpAE Fencing: Slow-mo Replay]]" where there's a modern fencing match that is over in two seconds, but when you watch the slow-mo replay, it becomes an epic battle in a banquet hall including a DamselInDistress, ExcuseMeWhileIMultitask, [[ImplausibleFencingPowers [[CleanCut slicing candles in half]], and [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning spinning]], all of which are lampshaded.
15th May '16 8:26:46 PM PaulA
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Added DiffLines:

* The sword fights near the end of ''Film/{{The Phantom|1996}}''.
20th Apr '16 7:54:48 PM PaulA
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* The sword fight between Percy and Paul at the end of ''Film/TheScarletPimpernel'' is almost entirely this trope, though it is clear from the beginning that Percy, the clearly superior combatant, is just messing with Paul. Eventually he tires of it and ends the fight.[[GetItOverWith He doesn't strike the killing blow, though.]]
* Averted in ''Film/RobinAndMarian'', which shared the same director and fight choreographer as Film/TheThreeMusketeers1973. The sword fights look slow, rough and bloody. By the end of their climatic DuelToTheDeath, Robin and the Sheriff are so exhausted that they can barely stand.

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* The sword fight between Percy Blakeney and Paul Chauvelin at the end of ''Film/TheScarletPimpernel'' ''Film/{{The Scarlet Pimpernel|1982}}'' is almost entirely this trope, though it is clear from the beginning that Percy, the clearly superior combatant, is just messing with Paul.his opponent. Eventually he tires of it and ends the fight. [[GetItOverWith He doesn't strike the killing blow, though.]]
* Averted in ''Film/RobinAndMarian'', which shared the same director and fight choreographer as Film/TheThreeMusketeers1973.''Film/{{The Three Musketeers|1973}}''. The sword fights look slow, rough and bloody. By the end of their climatic DuelToTheDeath, Robin and the Sheriff are so exhausted that they can barely stand.
14th Apr '16 10:34:11 AM erforce
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* All sword fights in ''Film/NateAndHayes'' is this.

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* All sword fights in ''Film/NateAndHayes'' is during the daring attack on the German gunboat are this.
21st Feb '16 6:56:06 PM TheBigBopper
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** The Disney TV Version of ''Series/{{Zorro}}'' in the 1950s somewhat subverted it as well, as Guy Williams, who played {{Franchise/Zorro}}, was actually a champion fencer. His Zorro used a more accurate fencing style, though still stylized to avoid injury.

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** The Disney TV Version of ''Series/{{Zorro}}'' in the 1950s somewhat subverted Downplayed it as well, as Guy Williams, who played {{Franchise/Zorro}}, was actually a champion fencer. His Zorro used a more accurate fencing style, though still stylized to avoid injury.



* The lightsaber battles from the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogy, dubbed "budget kendo" in some circles. The original idea behind the lightsabers was that they were difficult to handle, which limited their choreography to mostly slashes and parrys. For the prequels' GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning.

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* The lightsaber battles from the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogy, dubbed "budget kendo" in some circles. The original idea behind the lightsabers was that they were difficult to handle, which limited their choreography to mostly slashes and parrys. For the prequels' GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning.flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other.



* Somewhat averted in the Star Wars-inspired lightsaber duel in ''Film/RyanVsDorkman 2''. Though there is some flynning, the choreography is especially well-done and the two fighters actually seem to be trying to hit each other instead of just clanging swords. They also put some importance on showing just how dangerous the lightsabers are. One of the best moments is when one character has another's lightsaber pinned against a wall and the 2nd character grabs the other guy's head and tries to push it into the sabers. See the fight [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RATMJ8JH1qo here]].

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* Somewhat averted Downplayed in the Star Wars-inspired lightsaber duel in ''Film/RyanVsDorkman 2''. Though there is some flynning, the choreography is especially well-done and the two fighters actually seem to be trying to hit each other instead of just clanging swords. They also put some importance on showing just how dangerous the lightsabers are. One of the best moments is when one character has another's lightsaber pinned against a wall and the 2nd character grabs the other guy's head and tries to push it into the sabers. See the fight [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RATMJ8JH1qo here]].
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