History Main / Flynning

12th Jul '16 11:23:37 AM gravious
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* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur
** Ironically, and hilariously, subverted during Lancelot's otherwise very Flynn-esque attack on Swamp Castle, as he slaughters guards and unarmed wedding guests without encountering the slightest resistance.

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* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the first few seconds of the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur
Arthur, before swiftly moving on to BloodyHilarious territory.
** Ironically, and hilariously, Hilariously subverted during Lancelot's otherwise very Flynn-esque attack on Swamp Castle, as he slaughters guards and unarmed wedding guests without encountering the slightest resistance.
12th Jul '16 3:30:16 AM gravious
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Added DiffLines:

* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur
** Ironically, and hilariously, subverted during Lancelot's otherwise very Flynn-esque attack on Swamp Castle, as he slaughters guards and unarmed wedding guests without encountering the slightest resistance.
--> '''King of Swamp Castle:''' Did you kill all those guards?
--> '''Lancelot:''' Err, yes. Sorry.
--> '''King of Swamp Castle:''' [[SkewedPriorities They cost fifty pounds each!]]
7th Jul '16 8:09:21 PM Rebu
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* ''Film/{{Troy}}'''s Flynning is so obvious one does not even need to have so much as a cursory knowledge of actual swordplay to spot it. When Hector and Achilles fight, both of them avoid obvious killing strikes and holes in their opponent's guard on several occasions.

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* ''Film/{{Troy}}'''s Flynning is so obvious one does not even need to have so much as a cursory knowledge of actual swordplay to spot it. When Hector and Achilles fight, both of them avoid obvious killing strikes and holes in their opponent's guard on several occasions.occasions, though the former is less experienced, and [[CherryTapping the latter is getting fancy in order to utterly humiliate the former]].
3rd Jul '16 3:06:37 PM TheBigBopper
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** A variation happens with the final fight between Snake and Liquid, when their ''fists'' collide.
3rd Jul '16 1:52:22 PM FlakyPorcupine
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* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Nidhogg}}''. For a fencing game, there is hardly any flourish to the fencer's movements unless they try to opt for ConfusionFu. Sword-clashing just results in the screen flashing white, unless you have successfully parried the opponent's sword where you knock it out of their hands.
27th Jun '16 12:01:33 PM TheBigBopper
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But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking back in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.

to:

But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport Olympics rules fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking back in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.
28th May '16 3:59:09 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* In an episode of ''SlingsAndArrows,'' Geoffrey Tenant burst into a party wielding swords demanding a duel with his rival. Both being classically-trained Shakespearean actors, they naturally Flynn.

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* In an episode of ''SlingsAndArrows,'' ''Series/SlingsAndArrows,'' Geoffrey Tenant burst into a party wielding swords demanding a duel with his rival. Both being classically-trained Shakespearean actors, they naturally Flynn.
27th May '16 11:30:31 PM TheBigBopper
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But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.

to:

But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking back in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.
27th May '16 11:28:54 PM TheBigBopper
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But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking in the same motion. In real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other.

to:

But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking in the same motion. In real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.
27th May '16 10:53:57 PM TheBigBopper
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Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot calls for it.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children.]] The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the plot script calls for it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.Flynning