History Main / FlyNning

10th Feb '17 11:42:59 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare ATeamFiring, where instead of lots of sword clashing with nobody getting cut you have lots of bullets flying but nobody getting shot. Contrast SingleStrokeBattle, where both fighters are clearly aiming to kill with their first strike. See also AnachronismStew as swords and sword fighting techniques shown on film tend to be hundreds of years ahead of what would have been available in the time setting of a medieval film.[[note]]Might be a case of AcceptableBreaksFromReality, given that most cultures kept only haphazard records of their martial arts. On the flipside, some films use anachronistic techniques when there's a knowledge base concerning the techniques they ''did'' use.[[/note]] For details on how to depict sword fighting more accurately, see our UsefulNotes pages on UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship and UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}.

to:

Compare ATeamFiring, where instead of lots of sword clashing with nobody getting cut you have lots of bullets flying but nobody getting shot. Contrast SingleStrokeBattle, where both fighters are clearly aiming to kill with their first strike.strike and which can be over in an instant. See also AnachronismStew as swords and sword fighting techniques shown on film tend to be hundreds of years ahead of what would have been available in the time setting of a medieval film.[[note]]Might be a case of AcceptableBreaksFromReality, given that most cultures kept only haphazard records of their martial arts. On the flipside, some films use anachronistic techniques when there's a knowledge base concerning the techniques they ''did'' use.[[/note]] For details on how to depict sword fighting more accurately, see our UsefulNotes pages on UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship and UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}.
10th Feb '17 11:42:20 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare ATeamFiring, which replaces the swords with bullets. Contrast SingleStrokeBattle, which doesn't look elaborate ''enough''. See also AnachronismStew as swords and sword fighting techniques shown on film tend to be hundreds of years ahead of what would have been available in the time setting of a medieval film.[[note]]Might be a case of AcceptableBreaksFromReality, given that most cultures kept only haphazard records of their martial arts. On the flipside, some films use anachronistic techniques when there's a knowledge base concerning the techniques they ''did'' use.[[/note]] For details on how to depict sword fighting more accurately, see our UsefulNotes pages on UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship and UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}.

to:

Compare ATeamFiring, which replaces the swords where instead of lots of sword clashing with bullets. nobody getting cut you have lots of bullets flying but nobody getting shot. Contrast SingleStrokeBattle, which doesn't look elaborate ''enough''.where both fighters are clearly aiming to kill with their first strike. See also AnachronismStew as swords and sword fighting techniques shown on film tend to be hundreds of years ahead of what would have been available in the time setting of a medieval film.[[note]]Might be a case of AcceptableBreaksFromReality, given that most cultures kept only haphazard records of their martial arts. On the flipside, some films use anachronistic techniques when there's a knowledge base concerning the techniques they ''did'' use.[[/note]] For details on how to depict sword fighting more accurately, see our UsefulNotes pages on UsefulNotes/EuropeanSwordsmanship and UsefulNotes/{{Kenjutsu}}.
10th Feb '17 11:38:41 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or TheDragon to be full of action and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other until the script calls for it.

to:

Flynning exists, on stage at least, to make it look like two people are fighting without causing RealLife injuries; in live theater special effects are nigh well impossible and actors don't have stunt doubles. In fact, if the audience sees a fight that looks ''too'' realistic, they often stop caring about the scene and begin to worry genuinely for the ''actors'' and their safety. It's also done because real combat involving swords tended to be gory and violent, usually resulting in nasty bloody wounds and body parts being chopped off. That isn't gonna fly with the {{Media Watchdog}}s and Network Censors, [[ThinkOfTheChildren especially in the case of works geared toward children]]. The final reason is that the goal of practical swordsmanship is to take the shortest possible sequence of moves that leads to your opponent being dead and you being unharmed, so there are many ways in which a serious fight can end as a SingleStrokeBattle. That may be fine for when TheHero is dispatching insignificant {{mooks}}, and in some genres a single stroke battle can be made very suspenseful and thrilling, but if the director wants the big sword fight with TheRival or between TheHero and TheDragon to be full of action frenetic movement and drawn out to several minutes for the sake of drama, exciting minutes, then the choreographer has to contrive various ways for the combatants to fight continuously without hitting each other either one landing a telling hit until the script calls for it.
10th Feb '17 11:35:58 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to knock his opponent off balance, but of course instead of rushing in for the kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and prolong the fight.

to:

Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to knock his opponent off balance, but of course instead of rushing in for the kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and prolong the fight.
keep fighting.
10th Feb '17 11:27:44 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. You might get an occasional push, kick, or headbutt to break the deadlock, but if one party is stunned or loses his balance his enemy will obligingly give him just enough time to recover his guard instead of rushing in for the kill.

to:

Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. You might get an occasional The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to break the deadlock, knock his opponent off balance, but if one party is stunned or loses his balance his enemy will obligingly give him just enough time to recover his guard of course instead of rushing in for the kill.
kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and prolong the fight.
10th Feb '17 11:23:10 AM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. You might get an occasional push, kick, or headbutt to break the deadlock, but there will always be enough time for the staggered party to recover their guard before their enemy attacks again.

to:

Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. You might get an occasional push, kick, or headbutt to break the deadlock, but there if one party is stunned or loses his balance his enemy will always be obligingly give him just enough time for the staggered party to recover their his guard before their enemy attacks again.
instead of rushing in for the kill.
10th Feb '17 7:26:03 AM Tropetastic1995
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** For the prequels', Creator/GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other.

to:

** For the prequels', Creator/GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other. It's a bit more [[DownPlayedTrope downplayed]] compared to most other times this trope comes into play, however, as not only does [[AWizardDidIt the Force]] make all the more acrobatic, inefficient moves more applicable, most of the time the opposing duelists ''are'' aiming at each other, rather than eachother's blade. However, as a single lightsaber strike means certain amputation and/or death in most instances, lightsaber combat is based as much around countering your opponents moves as it is around quickly killing/ disarming the opponent.
30th Dec '16 1:29:08 PM ScrewySqrl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** "Robot of sherwood" dials it up to 11 when The Doctor has a flynning-filled dual with Robin Hood. Robin with a word, the Doctor with a ''spoon!''

to:

** "Robot of sherwood" dials it up to 11 when The Doctor has a flynning-filled dual with Robin Hood. Robin with a word, sword, the Doctor with a ''spoon!''
30th Dec '16 1:08:04 PM ScrewySqrl
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** "Robot of sherwood" dials it up to 11 when The Doctor has a flynning-filled dual with Robin Hood. Robin with a word, the Doctor with a ''spoon!''
9th Dec '16 5:44:19 PM SayaAensland
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Literature/XWingSeries novel ''Starfighters of Adumar'' introduced a culture that practiced semi-ritualistic [[DuelToTheDeath duels to the death]] with so-called "blastwords"[[note]]best described as a cross between a rapier and a diver's bang-stick[[/note]]. This trope was definitely not played straight; a lot of people apparently did tend to fence like this when fighting merely for sport, and fared badly when they came up against someone who was playing for keeps, even if that person has very little idea how to use a blastsword.

to:

** The Literature/XWingSeries novel ''Starfighters of Adumar'' introduced a culture that practiced semi-ritualistic [[DuelToTheDeath duels to the death]] with so-called "blastwords"[[note]]best "blastswords"[[note]]best described as a cross between a rapier and a diver's bang-stick[[/note]]. This trope was definitely not played straight; a lot of people apparently did tend to fence like this when fighting merely for sport, and fared badly when they came up against someone who was playing for keeps, even if that person has very little idea how to use a blastsword.
This list shows the last 10 events of 214. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FlyNning