History Main / FlyNning

25th Jul '16 2:26:27 PM StFan
Is there an issue? Send a Message





[[folder:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]]
* ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'''s sword heavy duels Flynned to cut down animation costs, though the participants generally aren't actually trying to kill each other.
** But ''Utena'', ever the {{Deconstruction}}, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] and [[FlawExploitation exploits]] this in the worst possible way.
--> [[spoiler:Akio]]: No, you know nothing besides play duels. But if you don't put up your sword now, you'll find out how terrifying real duels are.
* The beam-sabre fights in the various ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' shows go back and forth between using this trope and utterly averting it. Most are short and brutal, ending with severed limbs & impaled cockpits and/or reactors, but if both combatants are named characters expect a fair amount of Flynning before somebody finally bites it. The worst offender is likely ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing Gundam Wing]]'', although in the case of ''Wing Zero'' and ''Epyon'' this is somewhat justified; their pilots are ''trying'' to kill each other, but since the Gundams' computers are in perfect sync, they're able to parry any attack the other makes. Interestingly, whenever characters clash with real swords outside their HumongousMecha this trope is conspicuously averted. Witness Char and Amuro's memorably bloody rapier duel in the final act of the original ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' show.

to:

[[folder:{{Anime}} and {{Manga}}]]
[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
* ''Anime/RevolutionaryGirlUtena'''s sword heavy duels Flynned Flynns to cut down animation costs, though the participants generally aren't actually trying to kill each other.
**
other. But ''Utena'', ever the {{Deconstruction}}, [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] and [[FlawExploitation exploits]] this in the worst possible way.
--> [[spoiler:Akio]]: -->'''[[spoiler:Akio]]:''' No, you know nothing besides play duels. But if you don't put up your sword now, you'll find out how terrifying real duels are.
* ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'':
**
The beam-sabre fights in the various ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' shows go back and forth between using this trope and utterly averting it. Most are short and brutal, ending with severed limbs & impaled cockpits and/or reactors, but if both combatants are named characters expect a fair amount of Flynning before somebody finally bites it. The worst offender is likely ''[[Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing Gundam Wing]]'', although in the case of ''Wing Zero'' and ''Epyon'' this is somewhat justified; their pilots are ''trying'' to kill each other, but since the Gundams' computers are in perfect sync, they're able to parry any attack the other makes. Interestingly, whenever characters clash with real swords outside their HumongousMecha this trope is conspicuously averted. Witness Char and Amuro's memorably bloody rapier duel in the final act of the original ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam'' show.



* Possibly because the animators are a little [[MartialArtsDoNotWorkThatWay sketchy on the details of Western-style fighting]], most of the fights in ''RecordOfLodossWar'' have severe Flynning; people not only attack each other's weapons but each other's shields, which is even more silly.

to:

* Possibly because the animators are a little [[MartialArtsDoNotWorkThatWay sketchy on the details of Western-style fighting]], most of the fights in ''RecordOfLodossWar'' ''Roleplay/RecordOfLodossWar'' have severe Flynning; people not only attack each other's weapons but each other's shields, which is even more silly.



* Played straight, [[AvertedTrope averted]] and [[JustifiedTrope justified]] in ''La Seine no Hoshi'': French soldiers usually go for the body (and the eponymous heroine got her ass handed to her in her first real fight specifically because the commander of the French Guards had the habit of alternating between lethal attacks at the heart and mobility kills on the leg, catching her flat-footed when he suddenly used the latter), but the Black Tulip alternates between playing it straight to disarm his foe and going for the kill, and the Star of the Seine, [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower being strong enough to wield a heavy sidesword like a rapier]], usually goes for the enemy's sword in the attempt to numb the sword hand, thus making him drop it (most of the times) or even ''breaking it in two'' (the one time she fought a foe strong enough to not have the sword hand go numb but wielded a decorative rapier), and has no problems going for the kill whenever pissed or otherwise motivated (see her final duel with the commander of the French Guards: until then she had gone for trying to disarm, but as soon as she was unmasked she eschewed her usual tactics and tried to stab him until she succeeded).

to:

* Played straight, [[AvertedTrope averted]] and [[JustifiedTrope justified]] in ''La Seine no Hoshi'': French soldiers usually go for the body (and the eponymous heroine got her ass handed to her in her first real fight specifically because the commander of the French Guards had has the habit of alternating between lethal attacks at the heart and mobility kills on the leg, catching her flat-footed when he suddenly used uses the latter), but the latter). The Black Tulip Tulip, however, alternates between playing it straight to disarm his foe and going for the kill, and the kill. The Star of the Seine, [[CharlesAtlasSuperpower being strong enough to wield a heavy sidesword like a rapier]], usually goes for the enemy's sword in the attempt to numb the sword hand, thus making him drop it (most of the times) or even ''breaking it in two'' (the one time she fought a foe strong enough to not have the sword hand go numb but wielded a decorative rapier), and has no problems going for the kill whenever pissed or otherwise motivated (see her final duel with the commander of the French Guards: until then she had gone for trying to disarm, but as soon as she was unmasked she eschewed her usual tactics and tried to stab him until she succeeded).



* Parodied in ''{{Anime/Slayers}}'' OVA "Jeffrey's Knighthood". Jeffrey Mailstar, an inept and unskilled warrior, does ridiculous Flynning every time he tries swordplay (the opponent just stands there with weapon readied and watches Jeffrey repeatedly hitting his sword). Most real swordfights between skilled swordsmen (Gourry, Zangulus, etc) in this anime are either a few stop-shots of parries followed by a SingleStrokeBattle, or a showdown of sword magic abilities.

to:

* Parodied in ''{{Anime/Slayers}}'' ''LightNovel/{{Slayers}}'' OVA "Jeffrey's Knighthood". Jeffrey Mailstar, an inept and unskilled warrior, does ridiculous Flynning every time he tries swordplay (the opponent just stands there with weapon readied and watches Jeffrey repeatedly hitting his sword). Most real swordfights between skilled swordsmen (Gourry, Zangulus, etc) in this anime are either a few stop-shots of parries followed by a SingleStrokeBattle, or a showdown of sword magic abilities.



* Happens in Shadow Snark when Uma, Pinkie Pie, and Shadow try to poke each other with sticks. It eventually becomes a deconstruction when they end up trying cool sword fighting moves and have to ask their opponents to stage it.

to:

* Happens in Shadow Snark ''Shadow Snark'' when Uma, Pinkie Pie, and Shadow try to poke each other with sticks. It eventually becomes a deconstruction when they end up trying cool sword fighting moves and have to ask their opponents to stage it.



* In the ExpandedUniverse ''{{Discworld}}'' of Creator/AAPessimal, the Guild of Assassins makes a virtue of this, formally teaching Flynning alongside less showy but possibly more effective techniques for fighting with bladed weapons. It is described '''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5598298/1/Il-se-passait-au-nuit-du-P%C3%A8re-Porcher here]]''', where we learn the Guild has specialised teaching facilities set aside for this very purpose.

to:

* In the ExpandedUniverse ''{{Discworld}}'' ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' of Creator/AAPessimal, the Guild of Assassins makes a virtue of this, formally teaching Flynning alongside less showy but possibly more effective techniques for fighting with bladed weapons. It is described '''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/5598298/1/Il-se-passait-au-nuit-du-P%C3%A8re-Porcher here]]''', where we learn the Guild has specialised specialized teaching facilities set aside for this very purpose.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
* Justified in ''WesternAnimation/TheRoadToElDorado''. Protagonists Tulio and Miguel deliberately use Flynning to stage a pantomime street-fight (with rapiers; the classic duelling weapon) to divert attention from their con-tricks, in a manner that suggests they've done it before. Once out of trouble, they announce:
--> '''Tulio:''' Ladies and gentlemen, we've decided it's a draw!
--> '''Miguel:''' ''(tosses swords to guard's feet)'' Thank you all for coming! You've been great, see you soon!
--> '''Tulio:''' Adios!

to:

[[folder:Films -- Animated]]
Animation]]
* Justified in ''WesternAnimation/TheRoadToElDorado''. Protagonists Tulio and Miguel deliberately use Flynning to stage a pantomime street-fight (with rapiers; the classic duelling dueling weapon) to divert attention from their con-tricks, in a manner that suggests they've done it before. Once out of trouble, they announce:
--> '''Tulio:''' -->'''Tulio:''' Ladies and gentlemen, we've decided it's a draw!
-->
draw!\\
'''Miguel:''' ''(tosses ''[tosses swords to guard's feet)'' feet]'' Thank you all for coming! You've been great, see you soon!
-->
soon!\\
'''Tulio:''' Adios!Adios!
* In a 2009 animated ''WesternAnimation/WonderWoman'' film, Wonder Woman comes to modern America and sees a group of boys flynning in a park while excluding a nearby girl. The girl tries to make the best of it, saying she doesn't know how to fight anyway. Wonder Woman points out that the boys have no clue how to really fight either, and gives the girl some practical tips. [[TookALevelInBadass The girl promptly wipes the floor with all the boys]].
-->'''Steve:''' That was sweet, teaching her to disembowel her friends like that.



* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the first few seconds of the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur, before swiftly moving on to BloodyHilarious territory.

to:

* ''Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail'':
**
PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the first few seconds of the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur, before swiftly moving on to BloodyHilarious territory.



--> '''King of Swamp Castle:''' Did you kill all those guards?
--> '''Lancelot:''' Err, yes. Sorry.
--> '''King of Swamp Castle:''' [[SkewedPriorities They cost fifty pounds each!]]
* Invoked in the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBTtq2Gzm6w big duel]] in the filmation of ''[[SienkiewiczTrilogy Potop]]'', where an arrogant noble picks a fight with an experienced army colonel. The colonel spends the entire 'duel' meticulously humiliating the nobleman, who is very much trying to kill him, by deflecting every blow and relenting every time he's taken the offensive. Eventually the noble just asks him to GetItOverWith.
* The duel in ''TheGreatRace'' was an even more exaggerated version of this. For those who understand fencing terminology, it was two people endlessly repeating parry-riposte-counter parry-counter riposte-etc. in line 4. For those who do not, it was two people endlessly repeating the first two moves taught to beginning foil fencers. When they switched to sabers, it quickly descended into Pirate Halves.
* For all that it looks spectacular (and the dialogue cites real fencing masters and styles), the great battle between Inigo and Westley in ''Film/ThePrincessBride'' is almost entirely Flynning. [[WordOfGod The screenplay]] even says that the ''characters'' are Flynning; Wesley and Inigo both being masters with nothing personal driving their fight, they want to enjoy it.

to:

--> '''King --->'''King of Swamp Castle:''' Did you kill all those guards?
-->
guards?\\
'''Lancelot:''' Err, yes. Sorry.
-->
Sorry.\\
'''King of Swamp Castle:''' [[SkewedPriorities They cost fifty pounds each!]]
* Invoked in the [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rBTtq2Gzm6w big duel]] in the filmation of ''[[SienkiewiczTrilogy ''[[Literature/SienkiewiczTrilogy Potop]]'', where an arrogant noble picks a fight with an experienced army colonel. The colonel spends the entire 'duel' meticulously humiliating the nobleman, who is very much trying to kill him, by deflecting every blow and relenting every time he's taken the offensive. Eventually the noble just asks him to GetItOverWith.
* The duel in ''TheGreatRace'' ''Film/TheGreatRace'' was an even more exaggerated version of this. For those who understand fencing terminology, it was two people endlessly repeating parry-riposte-counter parry-counter riposte-etc. in line 4. For those who do not, it was two people endlessly repeating the first two moves taught to beginning foil fencers. When they switched to sabers, it quickly descended into Pirate Halves.
* ''Film/ThePrincessBride'':
**
For all that it looks spectacular (and the dialogue cites real fencing masters and styles), the great battle between Inigo and Westley in ''Film/ThePrincessBride'' Westley is almost entirely Flynning. [[WordOfGod The screenplay]] even says that the ''characters'' are Flynning; Wesley and Inigo both being masters with nothing personal driving their fight, they want to enjoy it.



* The lightsaber battles from the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogy, dubbed "budget kendo" in some circles. The original idea behind the lightsabers was that they were difficult to handle, which limited their choreography to mostly slashes and parrys. For the prequels' GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other.
** There were technical limitations involved as well as skill limitations. Every duel in the Original Trilogy involves Darth Vader. The Vader mask left David Prowse with such a restricted field of view that he had trouble even ''seeing'' the person he was dueling with, never mind trying to fight. The props themselves were also fragile, preventing the use of more aggressive and intense strikes.

to:

* * ''Franchise/StarWars'':
**
The lightsaber battles from the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogy, dubbed "budget kendo" in some circles. The original idea behind the lightsabers was that they were difficult to handle, which limited their choreography to mostly slashes and parrys. For the prequels' GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other.
**
parries. There were technical limitations involved as well as skill limitations. Every duel in the Original Trilogy involves Darth Vader. The Vader mask left David Prowse with such a restricted field of view that he had trouble even ''seeing'' the person he was dueling with, never mind trying to fight. The props themselves were also fragile, preventing the use of more aggressive and intense strikes.strikes.
** For the prequels', Creator/GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other.



* In ''BroadwayMelody of 1940'', the dance to "Please Don't Monkey With Broadway" has Fred Astaire and George Murphy flynning with canes.

to:

* In ''BroadwayMelody ''Film/BroadwayMelody of 1940'', the dance to "Please Don't Monkey With Broadway" has Fred Astaire and George Murphy flynning with canes.



* ''Film/{{Hook}}'''s climactic fight between Peter and the captain, which is all Flynning. In his review, Creator/RogerEbert lamented how boring and uninspired the whole sequence was.
** Earlier averted when Hook reacts to Rufio trying to clang swords with him high by [[spoiler:going low and stabbing him to death.]]

to:

* ''Film/{{Hook}}'''s climactic fight between Peter and the captain, which is all Flynning. In his review, Creator/RogerEbert lamented how boring and uninspired the whole sequence was.
**
was. Earlier averted when Hook reacts to Rufio trying to clang swords with him high by [[spoiler:going low and stabbing him to death.]]



-->'''Morgan''': Very pretty, Mr. Shaw.
-->'''William''': Thank you, ma'am. I had the good fortune of studying with a grand master in Vienna!
-->'''Morgan''': Now stop fiddling, and kill the man!
-->'''William''': Kill him? Bless me, we never got to that!
-->''*Morgan grabs William's arm and thrusts it forward, sending William's sword through the chest of the enemy mook.*''
-->'''William''': I see.

to:

-->'''Morgan''': -->'''Morgan:''' Very pretty, Mr. Shaw.
-->'''William''':
Shaw.\\
'''William:'''
Thank you, ma'am. I had the good fortune of studying with a grand master in Vienna!
-->'''Morgan''':
Vienna!\\
'''Morgan:'''
Now stop fiddling, and kill the man!
-->'''William''':
man!\\
'''William:'''
Kill him? Bless me, we never got to that!
-->''*Morgan
that!\\
''[Morgan
grabs William's arm and thrusts it forward, sending William's sword through the chest of the enemy mook.*''
-->'''William''':
mook]''\\
'''William:'''
I see.



* Jose Ferrer's version of ''Film/CyranoDeBergerac'' starts with a vintage demonstration of Flynning. Justified in that Cyrano wanted to humiliate his opponent before taking him down; [[ExcuseMeWhileIMultitask he was composing a sonnet in honor of the duel he was fighting,]] ending each stanza with "Then as I end the refrain, thrust home!"
* [[{{Egregious}} Egregiously]][[note]][[DrinkingGame/TVTropesWiki Drink!]][[/note]] used in ''Film/{{Spartacus}}''.

to:

* Jose Ferrer's version of ''Film/CyranoDeBergerac'' starts with a vintage demonstration of Flynning. Justified in that Cyrano wanted wants to humiliate his opponent before taking him down; [[ExcuseMeWhileIMultitask he was is composing a sonnet in honor of the duel he was is fighting,]] ending each stanza with "Then as I end the refrain, thrust home!"
* %%* [[{{Egregious}} Egregiously]][[note]][[DrinkingGame/TVTropesWiki Drink!]][[/note]] used in ''Film/{{Spartacus}}''.



* Subverted in ''Film/RedSonja'' (1985 film): When the Arnold Schwarzenegger character is fighting mooks, his first strike simply attacks the blade. His second strike muscles the sword back on target while the mook's sword is helplessly to the side.
** Which is known as "battement" and is a very effective fencing technique, especially if you're massively stronger than your opponents without being considerably slower.

to:

* Subverted in ''Film/RedSonja'' (1985 film): When the Arnold Schwarzenegger character is fighting mooks, his first strike simply attacks the blade. His second strike muscles the sword back on target while the mook's sword is helplessly to the side.
**
side. Which is known as "battement" and is a very effective fencing technique, especially if you're massively stronger than your opponents without being considerably slower.



* The villain of the Literature/{{Discworld}} book ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'' complains about the unrealistic swordplay in operas (the book takes place in the Ankh-Morpork opera house). Ironically, [[spoiler: he engages in an overly-clangy sword fight with another character, and dies when his opponent sticks the sword between his arm and his torso. Cue the super-long death speech.]]
** Also lampshaded in ''Discworld/MovingPictures,'' where an inexperienced human has to fight a veteran troll actor, and doesn't fully realize it's fake. The troll explains that all he has to do is parry dramatically.
** Also-also lampshaded in ''Wyrd Sisters'', where Tomjon gets trapped in every live actor's nightmare: ''everyone else in the cast'' has forgotten their lines, gotten distracted, or developed stage fright. The poor guy foresees a fight scene in which he will have to "parry his own wild thrusts and stab himself to death."

to:

* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
**
The villain of the Literature/{{Discworld}} book ''Discworld/{{Maskerade}}'' complains about the unrealistic swordplay in operas (the book takes place in the Ankh-Morpork opera house). Ironically, [[spoiler: he [[spoiler:he engages in an overly-clangy sword fight with another character, and dies when his opponent sticks the sword between his arm and his torso. Cue the super-long death speech.]]
** Also lampshaded in ''Discworld/MovingPictures,'' ''Discworld/MovingPictures'', where an inexperienced human has to fight a veteran troll actor, and doesn't fully realize it's fake. The troll explains that all he has to do is parry dramatically.
** Also-also lampshaded in ''Wyrd Sisters'', ''Discworld/WyrdSisters'', where Tomjon gets trapped in every live actor's nightmare: ''everyone else in the cast'' has forgotten their lines, gotten distracted, or developed stage fright. The poor guy foresees a fight scene in which he will have to "parry his own wild thrusts and stab himself to death."



* An early scene in ''[[HeraldsOfValdemar Exile's Valor]]'' features two of Alberich's students deciding to Flynn during a class practice bout to show off. Since they aren't nearly as good as they think they are, all they do is embarrass themselves (and get stuck with a hideous bill for salle damage).

to:

* An early scene in ''[[HeraldsOfValdemar ''[[Literature/HeraldsOfValdemar Exile's Valor]]'' features two of Alberich's students deciding to Flynn during a class practice bout to show off. Since they aren't nearly as good as they think they are, all they do is embarrass themselves (and get stuck with a hideous bill for salle damage).



--> Those prancing little pants-wetters come here to learn the colorful and gentlemanly art of fencing, with its many sporting ''limitations'' and its proscriptions against ''dishonorable'' engagements.
--> You, on the other hand...''you'' are going to learn how to ''kill men with a sword''.

to:

--> -->'''Don Tomsa Maramzalla:''' Those prancing little pants-wetters come here to learn the colorful and gentlemanly art of fencing, with its many sporting ''limitations'' and its proscriptions against ''dishonorable'' engagements.
-->
engagements.\\
You, on the other hand...hand... ''you'' are going to learn how to ''kill men with a sword''.



* The page quote ironically has C. S. Lewis decry this trope on stage, but in the next few sentences of PrinceCaspian he creates his own system of silly strikes which look no more like historical swordsmanship than this trope. Additionally, there is a difference between styles developed for rapiers and their kin and those for swords from the Middle Ages when used against armored warriors.

to:

* The page quote ironically has C. S. Lewis decry this trope on stage, but in the next few sentences of PrinceCaspian ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'' he creates his own system of silly strikes which look no more like historical swordsmanship than this trope. Additionally, there is a difference between styles developed for rapiers and their kin and those for swords from the Middle Ages when used against armored warriors.




[[folder:Live Action TV]]
* Any ''RobinHood'' series, except the British ''Series/RobinOfSherwood'', from the late 1980s/early 1990s.

to:

\n[[folder:Live Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* Any ''RobinHood'' ''Myth/RobinHood'' series, except the British ''Series/RobinOfSherwood'', from the late 1980s/early 1990s.



* Mal's duel with Atherton in the ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' episode "Shindig." Justified in that Atherton is quite skilled and is playing with Mal, knowing he can kill him at any time, while Mal is clueless, and thinks he's doing surprisingly well for his first ever SwordFight. When Atherton actually goes for blood it takes no more than a stroke or two.

to:

* Mal's duel with Atherton in the ''{{Series/Firefly}}'' ''Series/{{Firefly}}'' episode "Shindig." "Shindig". Justified in that Atherton is quite skilled and is playing with Mal, knowing he can kill him at any time, while Mal is clueless, and thinks he's doing surprisingly well for his first ever SwordFight. When Atherton actually goes for blood it takes no more than a stroke or two.



* Used on several occasions in ''Series/DoctorWho'' during the Pertwee/Baker era. A fencing scene in ''The Sea Devils''; after the Master disarms the Doctor, and has him pinned in a corner ready to deliver the killing blow, the Doctor escapes by ''kicking the Master back''.
** Played with in ''The Androids of Tara''. The Fourth Doctor ends up in a duel with "electro-swords". At first he seems incompetent with the blade, merely parrying blows. However, it quickly becomes clear that this is a ruse, as he unleashes more and more skill until finally besting his opponent with ease.
** ''The King's Demons'' features a very Flynnian swordfight between the Fifth Doctor and the Master. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQwYpezshCE]]
** ''The Christmas Invasion'' contains a particularly bad case of flynning between the Tenth Doctor and the leader of the Sycorax. Most notable is a moment when the Doctor charges the Sycorax leader with an overhead strike. In any realistic fight, the Doctor would've ended up with a sword through one of his hearts.
* [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] in the finale of the Evil Green Ranger series of episodes Green With Evil on ''MightyMorphinPowerRangers''. Jason has to destroy Tommy's sword in order to break Rita's spell and consequently spends much of their duel attacking Tommy's sword. Tommy's Flynning, however, is completely unjustified.

to:

* Used on several occasions in ''Series/DoctorWho'' during the Pertwee/Baker era. era.
**
A fencing scene in ''The "The Sea Devils''; Devils": after the Master disarms the Doctor, and has him pinned in a corner ready to deliver the killing blow, the Doctor escapes by ''kicking the Master back''.
** Played with in ''The "The Androids of Tara''.Tara". The Fourth Doctor ends up in a duel with "electro-swords". At first he seems incompetent with the blade, merely parrying blows. However, it quickly becomes clear that this is a ruse, as he unleashes more and more skill until finally besting his opponent with ease.
** ''The "The King's Demons'' Demons" features a very Flynnian swordfight between the Fifth Doctor and the Master. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQwYpezshCE]]
** ''The "The Christmas Invasion'' Invasion" contains a particularly bad case of flynning between the Tenth Doctor and the leader of the Sycorax. Most notable is a moment when the Doctor charges the Sycorax leader with an overhead strike. In any realistic fight, the Doctor would've ended up with a sword through one of his hearts.
* [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] {{Justified|Trope}} in the finale of the Evil Green Ranger series of episodes Green With Evil on ''MightyMorphinPowerRangers''.''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers''. Jason has to destroy Tommy's sword in order to break Rita's spell and consequently spends much of their duel attacking Tommy's sword. Tommy's Flynning, however, is completely unjustified.



* In ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'', this is done almost every episode. This is partly due to RuleOfCool, and partly because many of the guest stars had never before picked up a sword in their lives, so they had to rely upon Adrian Paul and the stunt coordinator to make the fights look exciting.
** In one commentary bit, it's mentioned that there's an easy way to tell whether the actors in a particular episode are any good with a sword: if the fight scene has a lot of cuts and changes in angle, it's done to disguise the weakness in an actor's form or to switch more capable stunt doubles in. If there are [[TheOner long periods without a cut or change in camera angle]], then it means the actors for that fight were good enough to avoid all that.
** FridgeBrilliance kicks in when you realize that for Immortals swordplay is very different because they can't just stab a vital place to finish it. They need a good, heavy, unimpeded swing which can only be done after you've tired your opponent out or disarmed them. That reasoning only works for really powerful Immortals, the younger ones can be incapacitated by the same blow that would work for a human. However since very few of the Immortals seen in the show are less than a century old most of them ''have'' built up that tolerance for pain.
* Though ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz''- being a ''Kamen Rider'' series- has its share of Flynning, it's notably subverted during a fencing duel between main character Takumi (minimum experience with swordplay) and [[TheRival rival]] Masato (president of the university fencing club). Takumi's offense consists of wildly aggressive Flynning which is expertly parried by Masato, who retaliates with a single, point-winning riposte. This happens three times in a row.

to:

* In ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'', this is done almost every episode. This is partly due to RuleOfCool, and partly because many of the guest stars had never before picked up a sword in their lives, so they had to rely upon Adrian Paul and the stunt coordinator to make the fights look exciting.
**
exciting. In one commentary bit, it's mentioned that there's an easy way to tell whether the actors in a particular episode are any good with a sword: if the fight scene has a lot of cuts and changes in angle, it's done to disguise the weakness in an actor's form or to switch more capable stunt doubles in. If there are [[TheOner long periods without a cut or change in camera angle]], then it means the actors for that fight were good enough to avoid all that.
**
that.\\\
FridgeBrilliance kicks in when you realize that for Immortals swordplay is very different different, because they can't just stab a vital place to finish it. They need a good, heavy, unimpeded swing which can only be done after you've tired your opponent out or disarmed them. That reasoning only works for really powerful Immortals, the younger ones can be incapacitated by the same blow that would work for a human. However since very few of the Immortals seen in the show are less than a century old most of them ''have'' built up that tolerance for pain.
* Though ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz''- ''Series/KamenRiderFaiz'' -- being a ''Kamen Rider'' series- series -- has its share of Flynning, it's notably subverted during a fencing duel between main character Takumi (minimum experience with swordplay) and [[TheRival rival]] Masato (president of the university fencing club). Takumi's offense consists of wildly aggressive Flynning which is expertly parried by Masato, who retaliates with a single, point-winning riposte. This happens three times in a row.



* Oddly averted on ''Series/OnceUponATime'' where the broadsword fights are pretty realistic. The Prince seems to truly be trying to hit his enemy whether using fits, elbows, or simply gutting them like a fish. This being a semi-family friendly show [[GoryDiscretionShot not much is shown when he does the latter]] and in a fight where he seems to be slicing up bad guys [[BloodlessCarnage there's hardly ever any blood]].
** It's pretty obvious that Captain Hook is Flynning on purpose in his fight with Emma in season two. He is, after all, a pirate with over three hundred years experience, and it is only the second time Emma has ever tried to use a sword in a fight. Judging by his taunts and absurdly embellished movements, he never had any intention of killing her--it's even arguable that [[FridgeBrilliance he let her knock him out because he already knew he had another way to make it to Storybrooke and his intended vengeance.]]
* Averted in 'Series/LegendOfTheSeeker'' -- the first time [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUitIsettrY#t=1m Richard fights Darken Rahl]], for instance, it really looks as though each of them is trying his utmost to kill the other.

to:

* ''Series/OnceUponATime'':
**
Oddly averted on ''Series/OnceUponATime'' where averted; the broadsword fights are pretty realistic. The Prince seems to truly be trying to hit his enemy whether using fits, elbows, or simply gutting them like a fish. This being a semi-family friendly show [[GoryDiscretionShot not much is shown when he does the latter]] and in a fight where he seems to be slicing up bad guys [[BloodlessCarnage there's hardly ever any blood]].
** It's pretty obvious that Captain Hook is Flynning on purpose in his fight with Emma in season two. He is, after all, a pirate with over three hundred years experience, and it is only the second time Emma has ever tried to use a sword in a fight. Judging by his taunts and absurdly embellished movements, he never had any intention of killing her--it's her -- it's even arguable that [[FridgeBrilliance he let her knock him out because he already knew he had another way to make it to Storybrooke and his intended vengeance.]]
* Averted in 'Series/LegendOfTheSeeker'' -- the first time [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUitIsettrY#t=1m Richard fights Darken Rahl]], Rahl, for instance, it really looks as though each of them is trying his utmost to kill the other.



* Any documentary that displays mass battles--particularly those made by the History Channel. The two four-episode-each Barbarians series, Rome: Rise and Fall of an Empire and those like it/made by the same studio/group tragically suffer from this heavily. Any and all other historical inaccuracies aside, just watch the big battle scenes. Stuntmen in differing suits of armor dance about each other while visibly, readily just clashing their swords against one another's. What makes this particularly egregious is the fact that in most, if not every shot, an overwhelming majority of the soldiers clashing blades are all HOLDING SHIELDS...and not ONE of them seems to even think of raising it to block an attack. Even more egregious in those episodes of above series' that focus on Ancient Rome and it's legions, who relied heavily on their shields, and only used their swords for stabbing; even in the early days of the Republic, pre-empire period, a Roman soldier would've looked at you as if you had two heads if you suggested using your sword to parry, block, or even do anything but stab and occasionally slash as need be, when he was trained to defend with his shield.
* Mostly averted in ''{{Series/Merlin}}''. Duels sometimes include this, but most often they just go for the kill and sword fights are over quickly. Even the Arthur vs. Mordred swordfight of legend takes all of ten seconds. [[spoiler:Arthur parries, hesitates to catch his breath, and Mordred runs him through.]]
** One behind-the-scenes clip of the choreographed sword fight rehearsals has the director saying "You have to believe you're going for the parts of the body."
** [[Recap/MerlinS03E11TheSorcerersShadow S3E11]] has a subversion: a pseudo-ninja in a tournament begins the "spinning blades" style of combat as he impressively advances towards Arthur...who stretches out a hand and knocks him on his back, winning the round in moments.

to:

* Any documentary that displays mass battles--particularly battles -- particularly those made by the History Channel. The two four-episode-each Barbarians series, Rome: Rise ''Rome: Rise'' and Fall ''Fall of an Empire Empire'' and those like it/made by the same studio/group tragically suffer from this heavily. Any and all other historical inaccuracies aside, just watch the big battle scenes. Stuntmen in differing suits of armor dance about each other while visibly, readily just clashing their swords against one another's. What makes this particularly egregious is the fact that in most, if not every shot, an overwhelming majority of the soldiers clashing blades are all HOLDING SHIELDS... and not ONE of them seems to even think of raising it to block an attack. Even more egregious in those episodes of above series' that focus on Ancient Rome and it's its legions, who relied heavily on their shields, and only used their swords for stabbing; even in the early days of the Republic, pre-empire period, a Roman soldier would've looked at you as if you had two heads if you suggested using your sword to parry, block, or even do anything but stab and occasionally slash as need be, when he was trained to defend with his shield.
* Mostly averted in ''{{Series/Merlin}}''.''{{Series/Merlin|2008}}''. Duels sometimes include this, but most often they just go for the kill and sword fights are over quickly. Even the Arthur vs. Mordred swordfight of legend takes all of ten seconds. [[spoiler:Arthur parries, hesitates to catch his breath, and Mordred runs him through.]]
**
]] One behind-the-scenes clip of the choreographed sword fight rehearsals has the director saying "You have to believe you're going for the parts of the body."
**
" [[Recap/MerlinS03E11TheSorcerersShadow S3E11]] "The Sorcerer's Shadow"]] has a subversion: a pseudo-ninja in a tournament begins the "spinning blades" style of combat as he impressively advances towards Arthur...Arthur... who stretches out a hand and knocks him on his back, winning the round in moments.



[[folder:Pinball]]

to:

[[folder:Pinball]][[folder:Pinballs]]



[[folder:Professional Wrestling]]

to:

[[folder:Professional [[folder:Pro Wrestling]]



[[folder:Theatre]]

to:

[[folder:Theatre]][[folder:Theater]]



* This is actually one of the reasons [[TheScottishTrope a certain play by Shakespeare]] is reputed to be cursed. That play... you know the one... requires an unusual amount of Flynning while wearing full costume on a stage that you ''hope'' the set crew has built strongly enough to take all that hopping, bouncing and slashing. Accidents happen.

to:

* This is actually one of the reasons [[TheScottishTrope a certain play by Shakespeare]] ''Theatre/{{Macbeth}}'' is reputed to be cursed. That play... you know the one... play requires an unusual amount of Flynning while wearing full costume on a stage that you ''hope'' the set crew has built strongly enough to take all that hopping, bouncing and slashing. Accidents happen.



* There is an episode in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', where a fighting scene is played on stage. Since the hero pretends to be an actor, a mini-game is presented where you have to respond with parry high to threaten high et cetera. Your performance is then rated by the audience. No matter how badly you do, you're given a chance to improve your score. Depending on your score, you're given gil, and also an item by Queen Brahne if you talk to her as Steiner later. If you can manage to impress all one hundred nobles and Queen Brahne, then she will grant a Moonstone, one of only four available in the game. This is extremely challenging, however, and not really worth it unless you're the type that has to do absolutely everything, as the Moonstone really isn't needed for much. Furthermore, in order to get a perfect score, you're pretty much required to retry, as it's only in latter tries that the more dazzling moves that are likely to truly impress the audience become available with frequency.

to:

* ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'':
**
There is an episode in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'', where a fighting scene is played on stage. Since the hero pretends to be an actor, a mini-game is presented where you have to respond with parry high to threaten high et cetera. Your performance is then rated by the audience. No matter how badly you do, you're given a chance to improve your score. Depending on your score, you're given gil, and also an item by Queen Brahne if you talk to her as Steiner later. If you can manage to impress all one hundred nobles and Queen Brahne, then she will grant a Moonstone, one of only four available in the game. This is extremely challenging, however, and not really worth it unless you're the type that has to do absolutely everything, as the Moonstone really isn't needed for much. Furthermore, in order to get a perfect score, you're pretty much required to retry, as it's only in latter tries that the more dazzling moves that are likely to truly impress the audience become available with frequency.



* Surprisingly, utilized in the Wii game ''PiratesOfTheCaribbean: Dead Man's Chest'' game. Whereas the previous swordsmanship title (''Twilight Princess'') only required a small wiggle of the Wiimote to make Link fight, ''Pirates'' actually ''requires'' the player to flail like Flynn during the fight sequences.

to:

* Surprisingly, utilized in the Wii game ''PiratesOfTheCaribbean: Dead Man's Chest'' ''Film/PiratesOfTheCaribbeanDeadMansChest'' game. Whereas the previous swordsmanship title (''Twilight Princess'') only required a small wiggle of the Wiimote to make Link fight, ''Pirates'' actually ''requires'' the player to flail like Flynn during the fight sequences.



* Speaking of knifeplay, ''MetalGearSolid4'''s second fight between Raiden and Vamp has the two characters sending sparks through the air as they repeatedly block and parry each other's knives. Of course, actually getting two knives to collide real life even once would be difficult even if it was choreographed, and downright impossible (not to mention stupid and pointless) in a real fight. For all their effort, they may as well have aimed for their target's ''body'' and not their weapon, since in a knife fight the only target you can hit at that distance is your opponent's hand--which is easily defended against by moving one's hand out of the way.
* [[http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/260688528/clang Clang]] is basically Creator/NealStephenson's attempt to develop a game that averts this trope as hard as humanly possible.
** The project is now defunct. However, it seemed that there is one insurmountable obstacle toward a realistic sword fighting game for the current market; any sport or martial art using a sword has immediate force feedback from pressure against your weapon. Even with a sword-hilt shaped motion controller, there is no reasonably-priced solution that would cause a player's controller to stop moving in the real world in a position analogous to the one where their avatar's sword did if a blow is parried or otherwise stopped. The player would invariably "overswing." Further seemingly insurmountable obstacles include grapples, blades binding, and making sure the television presents things to the player so the apparent height and location of an attack corresponds to where it would be if it were real given the unpredictable size and placement of the television used by each player.
* In the modern remake of ''[[VideoGame/SidMeiersPirates Sid Meier's Pirates!]]'', some characters in the background will do this during swordfights. The two main participants will also briefly do this when both characters go for a thrust at the same time.

to:

* Speaking of knifeplay, ''MetalGearSolid4'''s in ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots'' the second fight between Raiden and Vamp has the two characters sending sparks through the air as they repeatedly block and parry each other's knives. Of course, actually getting two knives to collide real life even once would be difficult even if it was choreographed, and downright impossible (not to mention stupid and pointless) in a real fight. For all their effort, they may as well have aimed for their target's ''body'' and not their weapon, since in a knife fight the only target you can hit at that distance is your opponent's hand--which hand -- which is easily defended against by moving one's hand out of the way.
* [[http://www.''[[http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/260688528/clang Clang]] Clang]]'' is basically Creator/NealStephenson's attempt to develop a game that averts this trope as hard as humanly possible.
**
possible. The project is now defunct. However, it seemed that there is one insurmountable obstacle toward a realistic sword fighting game for the current market; any sport or martial art using a sword has immediate force feedback from pressure against your weapon. Even with a sword-hilt shaped motion controller, there is no reasonably-priced solution that would cause a player's controller to stop moving in the real world in a position analogous to the one where their avatar's sword did if a blow is parried or otherwise stopped. The player would invariably "overswing." "overswing". Further seemingly insurmountable obstacles include grapples, blades binding, and making sure the television presents things to the player so the apparent height and location of an attack corresponds to where it would be if it were real given the unpredictable size and placement of the television used by each player.
* In the modern remake of ''[[VideoGame/SidMeiersPirates Sid Meier's Pirates!]]'', ''VideoGame/SidMeiersPirates'', some characters in the background will do this during swordfights. The two main participants will also briefly do this when both characters go for a thrust at the same time.



* TheGuild : a hand-to-hand combat version at the end of season two, Wade and Zaboo get into a fight. Wade spends the entire fight showboating while doing minimal damage, Zaboo takes it like a bitch manages to strike a firm enough friendship with Wade while being pummeled that Wade thinks Codex isn't worth the fight.
* WebVideo/SuburbanKnights: They fight like a bunch of internet reviewers who rarely leave their chairs...oh.
** Luckily for them, the {{Mooks}} are just as bad. [[spoiler:Because they are secretly just D&D nerds.]]

to:

* TheGuild : ''WebVideo/TheGuild'': a hand-to-hand combat version at the end of season two, two. Wade and Zaboo get into a fight. fight; Wade spends the entire fight showboating while doing minimal damage, damage. Zaboo takes it like a bitch and manages to strike a firm enough friendship with Wade while being pummeled that Wade thinks Codex isn't worth the fight.
* WebVideo/SuburbanKnights: ''WebVideo/SuburbanKnights'': They fight like a bunch of internet reviewers who rarely leave their chairs...oh.
**
chairs... oh. Luckily for them, the {{Mooks}} are just as bad. [[spoiler:Because they are secretly just D&D ''D&D'' nerds.]]



* Lampshaded in the DVDCommentary of the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "Sokka's Master", where Sifu Kisu (the show's martial art consultant) noted that "a real sword fight lasts [[SingleStrokeBattle less than 1.7 seconds]]", and that "it's not a pretty thing", as it would come down to [[AttackItsWeakPoint finding a vital point and stabbing it]]. It was justified in that instance though, as it wasn't a real match but a SecretTestOfCharacter. There also aren't that many {{Sword Fight}}s in ''Avatar'' though.

to:

* Lampshaded in the DVDCommentary of the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "Sokka's Master", where Sifu Kisu (the show's martial art consultant) noted that "a real sword fight lasts [[SingleStrokeBattle less than 1.7 seconds]]", and that "it's not a pretty thing", as it would come down to [[AttackItsWeakPoint finding a vital point and stabbing it]]. It was justified in that instance though, as it wasn't a real match but a SecretTestOfCharacter. There also aren't that many {{Sword Fight}}s in ''Avatar'' though.anyway.



* The ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' miniseries is even worse with its Flynning than the ''Franchise/StarWars'' franchise's live-action outings. Anakin and Asajj Ventress spend their entire fight spastically swinging wide in each other's general direction. Even less justified than normal in that it's ''animated'' and no one has to worry about injury.
** Although, averted in some fights. Characters often [[CombatPragmatist use weapons other than their lightsabers]] and actually do look like they're trying to injure each other. However, they still usually inexplicably pause after each attack.
* In a 2009 animated ''WesternAnimation/WonderWoman'' film, Wonder Woman comes to modern America and sees a group of boys flynning in a park while excluding a nearby girl. The girl tries to make the best of it, saying she doesn't know how to fight anyway. Wonder Woman points out that the boys have no clue how to really fight either, and gives the girl some practical tips. [[TookALevelInBadass The girl promptly wipes the floor with all the boys]].
-->'''Steve:''' That was sweet, teaching her to disembowel her friends like that.
* In the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes cartoon, ''WesternAnimation/TheScarletPumpernickel'', WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck plays the Flynn-type swashbuckler. Near the end, he engages in this kind of sword duel with Sylvester the Cat, who plays a Rathbone-type villain.

to:

* The ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsCloneWars'' miniseries is even worse with its Flynning than the ''Franchise/StarWars'' franchise's live-action outings. Anakin and Asajj Ventress spend their entire fight spastically swinging wide in each other's general direction. Even less justified than normal in that it's ''animated'' and no one no-one has to worry about injury.
** Although,
injury. Although averted in some fights. Characters often [[CombatPragmatist use weapons other than their lightsabers]] and actually do look like they're trying to injure each other. However, they still usually inexplicably pause after each attack.
* In a 2009 animated ''WesternAnimation/WonderWoman'' film, Wonder Woman comes to modern America and sees a group of boys flynning in a park while excluding a nearby girl. The girl tries to make the best of it, saying she doesn't know how to fight anyway. Wonder Woman points out that the boys have no clue how to really fight either, and gives the girl some practical tips. [[TookALevelInBadass The girl promptly wipes the floor with all the boys]].
-->'''Steve:''' That was sweet, teaching her to disembowel her friends like that.
* In the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes cartoon, ''WesternAnimation/TheScarletPumpernickel'', ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' cartoon "WesternAnimation/TheScarletPumpernickel", WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck plays the Flynn-type swashbuckler. Near the end, he engages in this kind of sword duel with Sylvester the Cat, who plays a Rathbone-type villain.



* One episode of WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse opened with Steven and the gems watching a sword fighting movie. Pearl criticizes the flynning, going on about how it isn't anything like real sword fighting. However, when she gives Steven a demonstration of "proper" sword fighting, she and her holographic-double sparring partner also aim for each other's swords.

to:

* One episode of WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse opened ''WesternAnimation/StevenUniverse'' opens with Steven and the gems watching a sword fighting sword-fighting movie. Pearl criticizes the flynning, going on about how it isn't anything like real sword fighting. However, when she gives Steven a demonstration of "proper" sword fighting, she and her holographic-double sparring partner also aim for each other's swords.



25th Jul '16 1:01:09 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In ''[[Literature/{{Chalion}} The Curse Of Chalion]]'' Caz reminisces about how he ''thought'' he was a good fencer with a repertoire of fancy moves in his youth until he met another boy who ignored his flashy technique and launched a simple stab that would have killed him had they been using real swords.

to:

* In ''[[Literature/{{Chalion}} The Curse Of Chalion]]'' ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion'' Caz reminisces about how he ''thought'' he was a good fencer with a repertoire of fancy moves in his youth until he met another boy who ignored his flashy technique and launched a simple stab that would have killed him had they been using real swords.
12th Jul '16 11:23:37 AM gravious
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur
** Ironically, and hilariously, subverted during Lancelot's otherwise very Flynn-esque attack on Swamp Castle, as he slaughters guards and unarmed wedding guests without encountering the slightest resistance.

to:

* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the first few seconds of the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur
Arthur, before swiftly moving on to BloodyHilarious territory.
** Ironically, and hilariously, Hilariously subverted during Lancelot's otherwise very Flynn-esque attack on Swamp Castle, as he slaughters guards and unarmed wedding guests without encountering the slightest resistance.
12th Jul '16 3:30:16 AM gravious
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* PlayedForLaughs in Film/MontyPythonAndTheHolyGrail during the fight between the [[YouShallNotPass Black Knight]] and King Arthur
** Ironically, and hilariously, subverted during Lancelot's otherwise very Flynn-esque attack on Swamp Castle, as he slaughters guards and unarmed wedding guests without encountering the slightest resistance.
--> '''King of Swamp Castle:''' Did you kill all those guards?
--> '''Lancelot:''' Err, yes. Sorry.
--> '''King of Swamp Castle:''' [[SkewedPriorities They cost fifty pounds each!]]
7th Jul '16 8:09:21 PM Rebu
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Film/{{Troy}}'''s Flynning is so obvious one does not even need to have so much as a cursory knowledge of actual swordplay to spot it. When Hector and Achilles fight, both of them avoid obvious killing strikes and holes in their opponent's guard on several occasions.

to:

* ''Film/{{Troy}}'''s Flynning is so obvious one does not even need to have so much as a cursory knowledge of actual swordplay to spot it. When Hector and Achilles fight, both of them avoid obvious killing strikes and holes in their opponent's guard on several occasions.occasions, though the former is less experienced, and [[CherryTapping the latter is getting fancy in order to utterly humiliate the former]].
3rd Jul '16 3:06:37 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** A variation happens with the final fight between Snake and Liquid, when their ''fists'' collide.
3rd Jul '16 1:52:22 PM FlakyPorcupine
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''VideoGame/{{Nidhogg}}''. For a fencing game, there is hardly any flourish to the fencer's movements unless they try to opt for ConfusionFu. Sword-clashing just results in the screen flashing white, unless you have successfully parried the opponent's sword where you knock it out of their hands.
27th Jun '16 12:01:33 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking back in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.

to:

But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport Olympics rules fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking back in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.
28th May '16 3:59:09 AM TheOneWhoTropes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In an episode of ''SlingsAndArrows,'' Geoffrey Tenant burst into a party wielding swords demanding a duel with his rival. Both being classically-trained Shakespearean actors, they naturally Flynn.

to:

* In an episode of ''SlingsAndArrows,'' ''Series/SlingsAndArrows,'' Geoffrey Tenant burst into a party wielding swords demanding a duel with his rival. Both being classically-trained Shakespearean actors, they naturally Flynn.
27th May '16 11:30:31 PM TheBigBopper
Is there an issue? Send a Message


But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.

to:

But it's not real swordplay. It's not a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like electronically scored sport fencing. Basically, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than trying to actually hit each other. Each attack will be deliberately aimed too high or off to the side so that it would miss the opponent even if they stood still without defending, and yet the defender will go out of their way to meet it in midair with a static block instead of taking advantage of the attacker's mistake by avoiding and striking back in the same motion. There is no such thing as a single-time defense and counterattack when two people are Flynning, even with weapons such as the rapier where this is a fundamental technique, and the two fighters take turns giving and receiving attacks as if they have an understanding not to hurt each other. Note that in real, deadly, swordplay, pure blocking parries that stop the vigorous movement of the enemy's sword dead are practically unknown. Even if damage to your own blade were impossible, just slightly diverting an attack so it keeps moving but misses you, while your own still-mobile sword goes on to NOT miss your enemy, is plainly far more desirable than bringing both blades to a halt.
This list shows the last 10 events of 188. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.FlyNning