History Main / FlyNning

19th Nov '17 5:05:40 PM TheBigBopper
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Especially in works with Eastern influence you can expect to see a preposterously reckless offense, typically consisting of [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning 360 degree spins and somersaults]] that would leave the back wide open, combined with absurdly overshot slashes and swipes that would invite a quick, lethal interruption. Despite the benefit to be gained by just sticking out their point at the right moment, the defender allows the attacker to whirl around like a dervish without taking advantage of these openings. Another hallmark of Flynning is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to knock his opponent off balance, but of course instead of rushing in for the kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and keep fighting.

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Especially in works with Eastern influence In the more flashy and energetic varieties of flynning you can expect to see a preposterously reckless offense, typically consisting of [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning 360 degree spins and somersaults]] that would leave the back wide open, combined with absurdly overshot slashes and swipes that would invite a quick, lethal interruption. Despite the benefit to be gained by just sticking out their point at the right moment, the defender allows the attacker to whirl around like a dervish without taking advantage of these openings. Another hallmark of Flynning is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to knock his opponent off balance, but of course instead of rushing in for the kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and keep fighting.
7th Nov '17 10:04:30 AM MasterFuzzy
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** "Robot of sherwood" dials it up to 11 when The Doctor has a flynning-filled dual with Robin Hood. Robin with a sword, the Doctor with a ''spoon!''

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** "Robot of sherwood" Sherwood" dials it up to 11 when The Doctor has a flynning-filled dual with Robin Hood. Robin with a sword, the Doctor with a ''spoon!''''spoon!''
*** In a possible nod to this trope, the Doctor mentions having learned from Cyrano de Bergerac, Richard the Lionheart, and Errol Flynn himself, who "had the most enormous...ego." A certain amount of FridgeBrilliance also sets in when one realizes that unlike most examples of this trope, the Doctor is a TechnicalPacifist who rarely uses swords at all.
6th Nov '17 12:31:43 PM INCspot
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* Deliberately invoked in ''Literature/TheBrotherOfTheBlackFlag'': as the novel was a tribute to the swashbuckler movies of the 1930s and 1940s, the author deliberately wrote the fight scenes to resemble the ones from said movies.

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* Deliberately invoked in ''Literature/TheBrotherOfTheBlackFlag'': ''Literature/TheBrotherhoodOfTheBlackFlag'': as the novel was a tribute to the swashbuckler movies of the 1930s and 1940s, the author deliberately wrote the fight scenes to resemble the ones from said movies.
6th Nov '17 12:31:10 PM INCspot
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to:

* Deliberately invoked in ''Literature/TheBrotherOfTheBlackFlag'': as the novel was a tribute to the swashbuckler movies of the 1930s and 1940s, the author deliberately wrote the fight scenes to resemble the ones from said movies.
4th Nov '17 3:41:21 PM TheBigBopper
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Added DiffLines:

* ''LightNovel/TheAsteriskWar'': The anime features many sword fights in which the fighters zip around at tremendous speed, attacking and dodging. While the intent may be to show the consequences of extreme agility, it often just looks as if they were deliberately missing by several feet, or simply unable to hit the side of a barn with their swords.
3rd Nov '17 10:09:56 PM foxley
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* As with most swashbucklers of the era, this happens in ''Film/AnneOfTheIndies''. It is especially obvious in the fight between Anne and Blackbeard; although this perhaps justified as this friendly sparring between two friends and not intended to be deadly combat.
1st Nov '17 9:49:09 PM TheBigBopper
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Especially in works with Eastern influence you can expect to see a preposterously reckless offense, typically consisting of [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning 360 degree spins and somersaults]] that would leave the back wide open, combined with absurdly overshot slashes and swipes that would invite a quick, lethal interruption. Despite the benefit to be gained by just sticking out their point at the right moment, the defender allows the attacker to whirl around like a dervish without taking advantage of these openings. Another hallmark of this style is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to knock his opponent off balance, but of course instead of rushing in for the kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and keep fighting.

To keep the excitement up, and sometimes to distract from poor blade work, the characters may chase each other through all sorts of locations and environemntal perils as they fight, such as up and down marble staircases, across the tops of tables in a tavern, or along the narrow catwalks of a construction site or factory with NoOSHACompliance. By the end of it one may have the other cornered in a dead end or on the edge of a presipice, which either leads to the killing blow or results in the cornered party performing a major stunt such as a ChandelierSwing to escape. ExoticWeaponSupremacy will be in effect and DualWielding is fetishized as the mark of a superior fighter, often appearing in contexts such as Viking Age Europe where dual wielding was almost never practiced. Exotic weapons and dual wielding did actually exist in certain historical contexts, but even if they are depicted in he right time and place, [[ImprobableUseOfAWeapon don't expect to see them used with correct technique]]. Curiously, the most common example of double-wielding, i.e. the use of the rapier and maine-gauche (essentially a dagger with large hand guard, designed specifically to parry and stab in case of BladeLock) is virtually never portrayed in media, even though it was an obvious choice of arms in a Rennaissance-era duel.

to:

Especially in works with Eastern influence you can expect to see a preposterously reckless offense, typically consisting of [[EverythingsBetterWithSpinning 360 degree spins and somersaults]] that would leave the back wide open, combined with absurdly overshot slashes and swipes that would invite a quick, lethal interruption. Despite the benefit to be gained by just sticking out their point at the right moment, the defender allows the attacker to whirl around like a dervish without taking advantage of these openings. Another hallmark of this style Flynning is poor application of distance or measure; They will probably spend most of the time intentionally fighting at a distance just close enough so that they can clash their swords together at the center or tip of their blades, but not close enough to hit any body part except the other swordsman's hand or forearm. Alternately they might get way too close to each other for the length of weapon they are using, perhaps resulting in a BladeLock where they push against each other while glowering between the blades, and persist in using their long weapons at the point where in a real fight both parties would switch to daggers and grappling. The BladeLock may be broken by one fighter using a push, kick, or headbutt to knock his opponent off balance, but of course instead of rushing in for the kill he will take his time so that the other guy can recover his guard and keep fighting.

To keep the excitement up, and sometimes to distract from poor blade work, the characters may chase each other through all sorts of locations and environemntal perils as they fight, such as up and down marble staircases, across the tops of tables in a tavern, or along the narrow catwalks of a construction site or factory with NoOSHACompliance. By the end of it one may have the other cornered in a dead end or on the edge of a presipice, which either leads to the killing blow or results in the cornered party performing a major stunt such as a ChandelierSwing to escape. ExoticWeaponSupremacy will be in effect and DualWielding is fetishized as the mark of a superior fighter, often appearing in contexts such as Viking Age Europe where dual wielding was almost never practiced. Exotic weapons and dual wielding did actually exist in certain historical contexts, but even if they are depicted in he right time and place, [[ImprobableUseOfAWeapon don't expect to see them used with correct technique]]. Curiously, [[note]]Curiously, the most common example of double-wielding, i.e. double-wielding in European history, the use of the rapier and maine-gauche (essentially a dagger with large hand guard, designed specifically to parry and stab in case of BladeLock) parrying dagger, is virtually never rarely portrayed in media, even though it was an obvious choice of arms in a Rennaissance-era duel.
media.[[/note]]



This leads into the second problem: most stage and screen fights are done without hand or face protection, and the risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. This is a big reason for SliceAndDiceSwordsmanship, since there is greater risk of accidental injury when thrusting is involved in live-action choreography, especially in theatre. Actors make their living with their bodies, and any injury that blemishes their appearance or forces them to take time off to recover can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, and both the insurance companies and the actors' managers will throw a fit if you let them do something they consider too dangerous. There are stunt doubles for productions that can afford it, but with the amount of dialogue and acting that go into these scenes there's only so much an impostor can get away with. With all of these things in mind, it's all too understandable that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury. Awkward prop weapons and costumes can be hard to work with too, and sometimes an important actor has some injury or disability that has to be covered up with Flynning.

to:

This leads into the second problem: most stage and screen fights are done without hand or face protection, and the risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. This is a big reason for SliceAndDiceSwordsmanship, since there is greater risk of accidental injury when thrusting is involved in live-action choreography, especially in theatre. Actors make their living with their bodies, and any kind of disabling or disfiguring injury that blemishes their appearance or forces them to take time off to recover can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, and both the insurance companies and the actors' managers will throw a fit if you let them do something they consider too dangerous. There are stunt doubles for productions that can afford it, but with the amount of dialogue and acting that go into these scenes there's only so much an impostor can get away with. With all of these things in mind, it's all too understandable that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury. Awkward prop weapons and costumes can be hard to work with too, and sometimes an important actor has some injury or disability that has to be covered up with Flynning.
1st Nov '17 6:59:01 AM Wereboar
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To keep the excitement up, and sometimes to distract from poor blade work, the characters may chase each other through all sorts of locations and environemntal perils as they fight, such as up and down marble staircases, across the tops of tables in a tavern, or along the narrow catwalks of a construction site or factory with NoOSHACompliance. By the end of it one may have the other cornered in a dead end or on the edge of a presipice, which either leads to the killing blow or results in the cornered party performing a major stunt such as a ChandelierSwing to escape. ExoticWeaponSupremacy will be in effect and DualWielding is fetishized as the mark of a superior fighter, often appearing in contexts such as Viking Age Europe where dual wielding was almost never practiced. Exotic weapons and dual wielding did actually exist in certain historical contexts, but even if they are depicted in he right time and place, [[ImprobableUseOfAWeapon don't expect to see them used with correct technique]].

to:

To keep the excitement up, and sometimes to distract from poor blade work, the characters may chase each other through all sorts of locations and environemntal perils as they fight, such as up and down marble staircases, across the tops of tables in a tavern, or along the narrow catwalks of a construction site or factory with NoOSHACompliance. By the end of it one may have the other cornered in a dead end or on the edge of a presipice, which either leads to the killing blow or results in the cornered party performing a major stunt such as a ChandelierSwing to escape. ExoticWeaponSupremacy will be in effect and DualWielding is fetishized as the mark of a superior fighter, often appearing in contexts such as Viking Age Europe where dual wielding was almost never practiced. Exotic weapons and dual wielding did actually exist in certain historical contexts, but even if they are depicted in he right time and place, [[ImprobableUseOfAWeapon don't expect to see them used with correct technique]].
technique]]. Curiously, the most common example of double-wielding, i.e. the use of the rapier and maine-gauche (essentially a dagger with large hand guard, designed specifically to parry and stab in case of BladeLock) is virtually never portrayed in media, even though it was an obvious choice of arms in a Rennaissance-era duel.
5th Oct '17 9:40:36 AM hullflyer
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** For all that it looks spectacular (and the dialogue cites real fencing masters and styles), the great battle between Inigo and Westley is almost entirely Flynning. [[WordOfGod The screenplay]] even says that the ''characters'' are Flynning; Wesley and Inigo both being masters with nothing personal driving their fight, they want to enjoy it.

to:

** For all that it looks spectacular (and the dialogue cites real fencing masters and styles), the great battle between Inigo and Westley is almost entirely Flynning. [[WordOfGod The screenplay]] even says that the ''characters'' are Flynning; Wesley and Inigo both being masters with nothing personal driving their fight, they want to enjoy it.it as it is so rare for them to encounter someone else on their level.
1st Oct '17 10:02:35 AM VG_Lover
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This leads into the second problem: most stage and screen fights are done without hand or face protection, and the risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. This is a big reason for SliceAndDiceSwordsmanship, since there is greater risk of accidental injury when thrusting is involved in live-action choreography, especially in theatre. Actors make their living with their bodies, and any injury that blemishes their appearance or forces them to take time off to recover can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, and both the insurance companies and the actors' managers will throw a fit if you let them do something they consider too dangerous. There are stunt doubles for productions that can afford it, but with the amount of dialogue and acting that go into these scenes there's only so much an impostor can get away with. With all of these things in mind, it's all too understandible that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury. Awkward prop weapons and costumes can be hard to work with too, and sometimes an important actor has some injury or disability that has to be covered up with Flynning.

to:

This leads into the second problem: most stage and screen fights are done without hand or face protection, and the risk of accidents is compounded when everyone is an amateur. This is a big reason for SliceAndDiceSwordsmanship, since there is greater risk of accidental injury when thrusting is involved in live-action choreography, especially in theatre. Actors make their living with their bodies, and any injury that blemishes their appearance or forces them to take time off to recover can be ruinous for their career. The more famous a star, the more expensive they are to insure, and both the insurance companies and the actors' managers will throw a fit if you let them do something they consider too dangerous. There are stunt doubles for productions that can afford it, but with the amount of dialogue and acting that go into these scenes there's only so much an impostor can get away with. With all of these things in mind, it's all too understandible understandable that the choreographer would sacrifice realism in order to minimize the risk of injury. Awkward prop weapons and costumes can be hard to work with too, and sometimes an important actor has some injury or disability that has to be covered up with Flynning.
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