History Main / FlyNning

20th Apr '16 7:54:48 PM PaulA
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* The sword fight between Percy and Paul at the end of ''Film/TheScarletPimpernel'' is almost entirely this trope, though it is clear from the beginning that Percy, the clearly superior combatant, is just messing with Paul. Eventually he tires of it and ends the fight.[[GetItOverWith He doesn't strike the killing blow, though.]]
* Averted in ''Film/RobinAndMarian'', which shared the same director and fight choreographer as Film/TheThreeMusketeers1973. The sword fights look slow, rough and bloody. By the end of their climatic DuelToTheDeath, Robin and the Sheriff are so exhausted that they can barely stand.

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* The sword fight between Percy Blakeney and Paul Chauvelin at the end of ''Film/TheScarletPimpernel'' ''Film/{{The Scarlet Pimpernel|1982}}'' is almost entirely this trope, though it is clear from the beginning that Percy, the clearly superior combatant, is just messing with Paul.his opponent. Eventually he tires of it and ends the fight. [[GetItOverWith He doesn't strike the killing blow, though.]]
* Averted in ''Film/RobinAndMarian'', which shared the same director and fight choreographer as Film/TheThreeMusketeers1973.''Film/{{The Three Musketeers|1973}}''. The sword fights look slow, rough and bloody. By the end of their climatic DuelToTheDeath, Robin and the Sheriff are so exhausted that they can barely stand.
14th Apr '16 10:34:11 AM erforce
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* All sword fights in ''Film/NateAndHayes'' is this.

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* All sword fights in ''Film/NateAndHayes'' is during the daring attack on the German gunboat are this.
21st Feb '16 6:56:06 PM TheBigBopper
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** The Disney TV Version of ''Series/{{Zorro}}'' in the 1950s somewhat subverted it as well, as Guy Williams, who played {{Franchise/Zorro}}, was actually a champion fencer. His Zorro used a more accurate fencing style, though still stylized to avoid injury.

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** The Disney TV Version of ''Series/{{Zorro}}'' in the 1950s somewhat subverted Downplayed it as well, as Guy Williams, who played {{Franchise/Zorro}}, was actually a champion fencer. His Zorro used a more accurate fencing style, though still stylized to avoid injury.



* The lightsaber battles from the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogy, dubbed "budget kendo" in some circles. The original idea behind the lightsabers was that they were difficult to handle, which limited their choreography to mostly slashes and parrys. For the prequels' GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning.

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* The lightsaber battles from the original ''Franchise/StarWars'' trilogy, dubbed "budget kendo" in some circles. The original idea behind the lightsabers was that they were difficult to handle, which limited their choreography to mostly slashes and parrys. For the prequels' GeorgeLucas specifically stated that the battles of the original trilogy were fought by "old men, feeble cyborgs and young kids" and he wanted the prequels to highlight a more sophisticated fighting style. They are more technically impressive and faster paced, but still [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J0mUVY9fLlw use common tricks]] associated with flynning.flynning such as time-wasting flourishes, obviously not aiming strikes at their opponents, and keeping at too far a distance to hit each other.



* Somewhat averted in the Star Wars-inspired lightsaber duel in ''Film/RyanVsDorkman 2''. Though there is some flynning, the choreography is especially well-done and the two fighters actually seem to be trying to hit each other instead of just clanging swords. They also put some importance on showing just how dangerous the lightsabers are. One of the best moments is when one character has another's lightsaber pinned against a wall and the 2nd character grabs the other guy's head and tries to push it into the sabers. See the fight [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RATMJ8JH1qo here]].

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* Somewhat averted Downplayed in the Star Wars-inspired lightsaber duel in ''Film/RyanVsDorkman 2''. Though there is some flynning, the choreography is especially well-done and the two fighters actually seem to be trying to hit each other instead of just clanging swords. They also put some importance on showing just how dangerous the lightsabers are. One of the best moments is when one character has another's lightsaber pinned against a wall and the 2nd character grabs the other guy's head and tries to push it into the sabers. See the fight [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RATMJ8JH1qo here]].
21st Feb '16 6:38:48 PM TheBigBopper
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But it's not real swordplay. It's not even a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like competitive fencing. Essentially, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than each other. One of the easiest ways to see what's going on is to ask yourself what would happen if one combatant simply lowered his sword and let the other complete his strike. Often they will be intentionally fighting at a distance where they can cross their swords together but where their strike wouldn't actually be able to reach their opponent's body, whereas two people actually trying to kill each other would close to a range where their blows would connect with their target. With that in mind, parrying a strike that wouldn't hit you if you did nothing is merely a waste of time and energy.

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But it's not real swordplay. It's not even a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like competitive fencing. Essentially, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than each other. One of the easiest ways to see what's going on is to ask yourself what would happen if one combatant simply lowered his sword and let the other complete his strike. Often they will be intentionally fighting at a distance where they can cross their swords together but where their strike wouldn't actually be able to reach their opponent's body, whereas two people actually trying to kill each other would close to a range where their blows would connect with their target. With that in mind, parrying a strike that wouldn't hit you if you did nothing is merely a waste of time and energy.
energy. This disregard for distance is also seen in fights between weapons of unequal length, such as a sword and a dagger. In a movie the dagger man will make no attempt to close in to where he can hit his opponent and they can't bring their weapon to bear, and the swordsman will fight at the dagger man's range rather than take advantage of his own weapon's superior reach.



* Speaking of knifeplay, ''MetalGearSolid4'''s second fight between Raiden and Vamp has the two characters sending sparks through the air as they repeatedly block and parry each other's knives. Of course, actually getting two knives to collide real life even once would be difficult even if it was choreographed, and downright impossible (not to mention stupid and pointless) in a real fight. For all their effort, they may as well have aimed for their target's ''body'' and not their weapon.

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* Speaking of knifeplay, ''MetalGearSolid4'''s second fight between Raiden and Vamp has the two characters sending sparks through the air as they repeatedly block and parry each other's knives. Of course, actually getting two knives to collide real life even once would be difficult even if it was choreographed, and downright impossible (not to mention stupid and pointless) in a real fight. For all their effort, they may as well have aimed for their target's ''body'' and not their weapon.weapon, since in a knife fight the only target you can hit at that distance is your opponent's hand--which is easily defended against by moving one's hand out of the way.
21st Feb '16 6:27:08 PM TheBigBopper
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But it's not real swordplay. It's not even a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like competitive fencing. Essentially, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than each other.

The other primary variety of unrealistic fencing (more popular in the Far East and modern works) is a preposterously overactive offense, typically consisting of spin and flips that would leave the back wide open combined with absurdly overshot slashes and swipes that would invite a quick lethal interruption.

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But it's not real swordplay. It's not even a decent simulation, or even a poor simulation like competitive fencing. Essentially, it works out to the two combatants deliberately trying to hit each others' weapons with an impressive clanging sound, rather than each other.

other. One of the easiest ways to see what's going on is to ask yourself what would happen if one combatant simply lowered his sword and let the other complete his strike. Often they will be intentionally fighting at a distance where they can cross their swords together but where their strike wouldn't actually be able to reach their opponent's body, whereas two people actually trying to kill each other would close to a range where their blows would connect with their target. With that in mind, parrying a strike that wouldn't hit you if you did nothing is merely a waste of time and energy.

The other primary variety of unrealistic fencing (more popular in the Far East and modern works) is a preposterously overactive offense, typically consisting of spin and flips that would leave the back wide open combined with absurdly overshot slashes and swipes that would invite a quick quick, lethal interruption.
21st Feb '16 2:11:27 AM EDP
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* Normally {{Averted}} in ''ComicBook/TexWiller'', as whenever blades are involved they use simple moves aimed at their opponents and punches and kicks may be involved (in fact Tex usually wins his knife fights by punching out his opponent, either because he feels he doesn't deserve to die or [[CruelMercy humiliate him]]. The one time it's played straight [[JustifiedTrope there's a good reason]]: Tex, who was visiting Cuba, was forced in a sword duel in a church against a Spanish ussar, with Tex having no experience with sabres and the ussar playing with him... And then Tex lures his opponent between the benches, [[RealityEnsues where there's no space to properly use a sabre and Tex can use his superior strength to disarm him]].
18th Jan '16 2:15:56 AM IndirectActiveTransport
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* Pro wrestling itself has specific weapon spot known as an Ogelthorpe special that often involves flynning with [[ImprovisedWeapon strange implements]].
8th Jan '16 2:52:00 PM chc232323
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** The project is now defunct. However, it seemed that there is one insurmountable obstacle toward a realistic sword fighting game for the current market; any sport or martial art using a sword has immediate force feedback from pressure against your weapon. Even with a sword-hilt shaped motion controller, there is no reasonably-priced solution that would cause a player's controller to stop moving in the real world in a position analogous to the one where their avatar's sword did if a blow is parried or otherwise stopped. The player would invariably "overswing." Further seemingly insurmountable obstacles include grapples, blades binding, and making sure the television presents things to the player so the apparent height and location of an attack corresponds to where it would be if it were real given the unpredictable size and placement of the television used by each player.
6th Jan '16 9:17:48 PM nombretomado
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* Can be attempted in the ''SoulSeries'', but will usually result in having your weapons break (''Soul Edge'') or being blown back by the force of inertia (the ''Calibur'' games.) Though a particularly long Guard Impact chain can look rather like Flynning.

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* Can be attempted in the ''SoulSeries'', ''VideoGame/SoulSeries'', but will usually result in having your weapons break (''Soul Edge'') or being blown back by the force of inertia (the ''Calibur'' games.) Though a particularly long Guard Impact chain can look rather like Flynning.
27th Dec '15 5:07:13 PM nombretomado
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* Parodied in ''TheSlayers'' OVA "Jeffrey's Knighthood". Jeffrey Mailstar, an inept and unskilled warrior, does ridiculous Flynning every time he tries swordplay (the opponent just stands there with weapon readied and watches Jeffrey repeatedly hitting his sword). Most real swordfights between skilled swordsmen (Gourry, Zangulus, etc) in this anime are either a few stop-shots of parries followed by a SingleStrokeBattle, or a showdown of sword magic abilities.

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* Parodied in ''TheSlayers'' ''{{Anime/Slayers}}'' OVA "Jeffrey's Knighthood". Jeffrey Mailstar, an inept and unskilled warrior, does ridiculous Flynning every time he tries swordplay (the opponent just stands there with weapon readied and watches Jeffrey repeatedly hitting his sword). Most real swordfights between skilled swordsmen (Gourry, Zangulus, etc) in this anime are either a few stop-shots of parries followed by a SingleStrokeBattle, or a showdown of sword magic abilities.
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